Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question

Tell me whether my config is ok :(

Tags:
  • Power Supplies
  • Configuration
  • Components
Last response: in Components
March 19, 2010 1:40:21 PM

Hi All,
I'm coming up with the following config for my pc and m trying to get an okay UPS for it. The following is what m buying.

a core2duo 2.8 wolfsdale cpu
foxconn mars lga775 motherboard
kingston 2 GB ddr2 800 mhz
xfx radeon 5830 HD
antec 650W continuous at 45C
haf 932 casing

Guys/Ladies my problem is to buy a UPS that could support this system. I'm planning on buying a prolink 12kV UPS but m not sure how good it'll be with the config I've shown above. I don't intend to play games at high resolutions. probable res would 1024*768.
Please tell me if this UPS would be enough to take on the load :)  tnx..If there are any pros or cons on the UPS please let me know.

More about : config

March 19, 2010 3:17:25 PM

12kV? That would fry your system alive. Or did you mean 12kW? That's still pretty high, though. Even a 450W UPS would be enough for that system, if only to protect it from power interruptions. You won't be reaching 400W with that setup, more like 300-ish.

Also, if you will only game at 1024x768, then get a 5670 or something like that. The 5830 is good for resolutions like 1920x1200, or 1680x1050. Anything lower, and that card is overkill. It does leave room for improving your monitor, though.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
March 19, 2010 3:48:18 PM

The only problem I see in your whole setup there is that your GPU is WAY better than your CPU. You should either drop the GPU to a 5670, or move up to a better CPU like a core i3-i5 or even move to an AMD AthlonII x3 or x4 or PhenomII. You can get a better CPU that will better match that 5830 for not that much money, especially with an AMD.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 144 ) Power supply
March 19, 2010 3:56:35 PM

gracefully, he may have meant 12 kVA.

twick, what is your intended reason for the UPS? I ask that because there are generally two reason for a USP. Primary reason is to keep the system running long enough after a power outage to close everything down in an orderly fashion to prevent loss of data. For that all you need is enough capacity to keep the system running maybe 5 minutes.

The second reason is to provide power during momentary power outages.
m
0
l
March 19, 2010 5:58:54 PM

twickramasooriya said:
Hi All,
I'm coming up with the following config for my pc and m trying to get an okay UPS for it. The following is what m buying.

a core2duo 2.8 wolfsdale cpu
foxconn mars lga775 motherboard
kingston 2 GB ddr2 800 mhz
xfx radeon 5830 HD
antec 650W continuous at 45C
haf 932 casing

Guys/Ladies my problem is to buy a UPS that could support this system. I'm planning on buying a prolink 12kV UPS but m not sure how good it'll be with the config I've shown above. I don't intend to play games at high resolutions. probable res would 1024*768.
Please tell me if this UPS would be enough to take on the load :)  tnx..If there are any pros or cons on the UPS please let me know.

Hi
what is your monitor size. please state that. as far as i know for the rest of the system a 700va would work perfectly. not if u want to have a back-up of like 1hr + then u should connect car batteries to the ups. it will increase the back-up time. but the main question stands that what is the size of your monitor. and there is no need to get a 12kva ups. its way too big for your system. and it will cost u fortunes as well. but on the other hand as the above poster said that your pc will get fried, that is not the case. there will be no harm as long as the ups is made for pcs. there are two types of ups, one for household purposes and one for computer. get the computer ones but they are expensive as compared to the other type because they have high efficiency. Hope i helped
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
March 20, 2010 12:13:15 AM

Don't bother with Core 2 Duo - it's dead.

For the same money you can get a Core i5 or top-end Phenom II X4 system.
m
0
l
a c 252 ) Power supply
March 20, 2010 12:27:50 AM

Note....hi end PSU's often want a pure sine wave output .... very few UPS can deliver that

http://www.dougv.com/blog/2010/03/01/active-pfc-enabled...

It turns out that most PC power supply units with active power factor correction (PFC) do not work well with lower-cost uninterrupted power supplies (UPS), e.g. battery back-ups. This I learned the hard way, as my Antec EarthWatts EA 500 PSU, which I adore, will go dead the second the battery on my APC Back-UPS BX1300LCD kicks in.

That’s because APC’s Back-UPS units output power, when on battery, as a modified sine wave, rather than a true sine wave.

In short, if you send a high-end PSU the current created by a lower-end UPS, the PSU’s built-in power factor correction hates it, and cuts power to the PC immediately. As in, the exact thing you bought the UPS to prevent in the first place is exactly what happens.



http://vr-zone.com/articles/ocz-debuts-300-ups-for-enth...
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8914/psu-414/PC_Power...
m
0
l
March 20, 2010 8:18:39 AM

jsc said:
gracefully, he may have meant 12 kVA.

twick, what is your intended reason for the UPS? I ask that because there are generally two reason for a USP. Primary reason is to keep the system running long enough after a power outage to close everything down in an orderly fashion to prevent loss of data. For that all you need is enough capacity to keep the system running maybe 5 minutes.

The second reason is to provide power during momentary power outages.


Ah right, UPS units are usually labeled with VA instead of W. It gives the illusion of high capacity, whereas the real output is much lower.

JackNaylorPE said:
Note....hi end PSU's often want a pure sine wave output .... very few UPS can deliver that

http://www.dougv.com/blog/2010/03/01/active-pfc-enabled...

It turns out that most PC power supply units with active power factor correction (PFC) do not work well with lower-cost uninterrupted power supplies (UPS), e.g. battery back-ups. This I learned the hard way, as my Antec EarthWatts EA 500 PSU, which I adore, will go dead the second the battery on my APC Back-UPS BX1300LCD kicks in.

That’s because APC’s Back-UPS units output power, when on battery, as a modified sine wave, rather than a true sine wave.

In short, if you send a high-end PSU the current created by a lower-end UPS, the PSU’s built-in power factor correction hates it, and cuts power to the PC immediately. As in, the exact thing you bought the UPS to prevent in the first place is exactly what happens.



http://vr-zone.com/articles/ocz-debuts-300-ups-for-enth...
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8914/psu-414/PC_Power...


Nice article. I'll put that in my reference list the next time I get a UPS or a new PSU.
m
0
l
March 22, 2010 4:41:33 PM

LePhuronn said:
Don't bother with Core 2 Duo - it's dead.

For the same money you can get a Core i5 or top-end Phenom II X4 system.


THANK YOU for someone finally saying it, why would you get a duo anymore, especially if u want to game. The pc world standard is now a quad core, and a quad core would better compliment the stronger gpu
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
March 22, 2010 6:49:55 PM

lol. You don't NEED a quad yet, but a better dual is a much better choice, or a quad if you can afford it. AthlonII x3 or x4 is solid for the price and its nicely upgradeable. A Phenom II x3 or x4 is even better and still pretty inexpensive. the i3 and i5 duals are overpriced for their performance. the i5 750 is a pretty sweet spot in price/performance, etc.
m
0
l