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Installing Motherboard?

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August 10, 2010 9:33:56 PM

Is there really any reason some people install cpu, ram, etc before the insert it into the case and vice versa? Or is it just preference?
Which one would be safer for a first time builder?

More about : installing motherboard

a b V Motherboard
August 10, 2010 10:36:23 PM

hmmm. i installed mobo first, then everything else. No i don't think there's any problem.
a b V Motherboard
August 10, 2010 11:59:45 PM

It's not necessary, but it only takes a minute to see if it will actually work before you go to all the trouble of putting it in the case. It's just a good thing to do.
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a b V Motherboard
August 11, 2010 12:01:27 AM

For the infamous intel stock coolers with the push-pins, it is better to install out of the case so you can check and make sure on the underside that the pins are secure. Plus, it takes a scary amount of force for some coolers to get those pins to "click" and out of the case provides better support than sitting on case standoffs.

AMD, on the other hand, does not have those shorfalls. Feel free to install while the motherboard is in the case.
a c 234 V Motherboard
August 11, 2010 12:11:20 AM

I would recommend putting the CPU, RAM and Heat Sink fan on the motherboard outside of the case ( http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274745-31-step-step-g... ).

Reason I recommend installing outside the case... 1) Easy of installation of all components, 2) Most aftermarket heat sinks required a back plate to be installed on the motherboard, which requires to be install outside of the case, 3) RAM installation on the motherboard is easier and better due to the amount of force required to install in the DIMM, 4) for testing of equipment (breadboarding) prior to installation into the case, which helps for troubleshooting of any build issues if required.
a b V Motherboard
August 11, 2010 12:17:38 AM

^ waste of time, breadboarding, Thats for some other usage :/ 

till c2quads there are no so called backplates afaik.

Better? meaning i magically get more gigs and tighter timings.

^ FAIL!
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 1:40:06 PM

Fetal said:
^ waste of time, breadboarding, Thats for some other usage :/ 

till c2quads there are no so called backplates afaik.

Better? meaning i magically get more gigs and tighter timings.

^ FAIL!


Typical response of ignorance.
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 4:04:12 PM

^ typical response form a blabber.
a c 234 V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 4:38:52 PM

Fetal said:
^ waste of time, breadboarding, Thats for some other usage :/ 
I will give you a point on breadboarding, as I myself don't typically do it, but a vast majority of builders do, so it is a good option to keep open.
Fetal said:
till c2quads there are no so called backplates afaik.
I was really talking about aftermarket coolers, which have been in place since they started moving away from push-pins. With that said, heat sinks with push-pins, installing them outside of the case is really the only true way to verify they were install completely and correctly. Even case with motherboard knockouts, it still isn't a good option to install inside of the case... IMO
Fetal said:
Better? meaning i magically get more gigs and tighter timings.
Okay... maybe my wording could've been a little better (no pun intended) but basically what I was trying to say that due to the amount of force to push down on the RAM, it is easier with a motherboard on a flat surface and not on standoffs where the board can bow. This makes the install process better for the user, since they don't have to worry about thinking they are going to break the board.


a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 5:43:34 PM

breadboarding is for people who are actually getting expensive *** and for people who are troubleshooting.

you opinion may be right, but haven't ever broken anything.

nope, again never had problems installing rams inside case. you are wrong here. so you say that whenever you wanna upgrade ram, you should take your build out and install the ram? pretty f'd up for people upgrading on branded desktops eh?
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 6:40:05 PM

^+1 jitpub you blabber.

[:badge]


a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 6:47:38 PM

^tecmo take your philosophical bullcrap elsewhere. Like here>>> [:badge:3]


a c 234 V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 6:48:43 PM

badge said:
^+1 jitpub you blabber.

[:badge]


badge said:
^tecmo take your philosophical bullcrap elsewhere. Like here>>> [:badge:3]


This from the "Forum Jester"

[:badge] [:badge:3]
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 6:56:57 PM

@OP, Install the RAM, HSF, CPU as well as connecting the case wires to the MB Front Panel Control headers before screwing it down makes things easier. If the MB is new or a RMA replacement, add a VC and RAM and connect the PSU and look for POST before doing all the work of mounting it in the case and tearing it back out for nothing. Breadboard only if you have more than two-hundred dollars in your pocket at the time.
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 6:59:10 PM

tecmo34 said:
This from the "Forum Jester"

[:badge] [:badge:3]


pssssssssssst. There is a link under one of those. This has been whispered so no one else heard OK.
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 7:10:35 PM

If the board is in the case, of course it does not make sense to take out it to install RAM.

In the end it's up to you. But this thread was not about upgrading old builds, it was about assembling a new build. I find that if the board is out of the case ALREADY, it is easier to install the CPU, RAM, and heatsink before you mount it. A new board can take a lot of force to insert RAM, so why not install it on a flat surface before you put it in the case? I have built a lot of systems, and after many years of trial and error, I think it's the best way to go. I believe most experienced builders will agree.

You can plug the GPU into it, hook up the power, and do a test boot before you mount it all up in the case. Why not? Many times, a no boot may be caused by a direct short, something not lining up right, there are many reasons why the board may not boot simply due to an error mounting it in the case. If you tested it before you installed it, and it booted fine, that immediately tells you that you have done something wrong during mounting. There are reasons we stand by this procedure.

Do you have to follow the advice of experienced builders? No of course not. It's your money, and your parts, you do what ever you think is right. You can then join the hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of posters over the years who ask this question:
"NEW BUILD WON"T BOOT I put it all together and turned on the switch. The fans come on lights come on and the drives spin up, but nothing shows up on my monitor. Is my monitor or GPU bad?"

Oh yeah, blabber, blabber, blabber blab blab, blabber.
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 9:01:41 PM

^ building for a long time. never encountered any problem.

btw he isn't the forum jester, he is the forum Peepin Tom. :D 
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 9:03:39 PM

And to finally answer the question and end (t)his senseless blabbing :p !

YES! its PREFERENCE!
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 9:18:06 PM

Fetal said:
^ building for a long time. never encountered any problem.

btw he isn't the forum jester, he is the forum Peepin Tom. :D 


:lol:  I'll go along with that, and long time is relevant. A lot of us here consider a "long time" more years than you are old.
So you are free now to start with the old geezer jokes.
a b V Motherboard
August 12, 2010 9:46:36 PM

You know for your age, you sure act like a newly blooming vixen.
!