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Samsung SSD magician over provisioning

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January 6, 2012 9:02:32 PM

The Samsung Magician software includes a portion for over provisioning. It has a recommended setting which appears to be about 10%. My question is that it shows OP available as 0. I thought part of the SSD was already setup with a portion allocated for OP. So I am wondering if following its suggestion and letting it set up that recommended amount would actually improve performance or just basically shrink my drives volume. It is the Samsung 830 256 GB version.

Thanks in advance !

More about : samsung ssd magician provisioning

January 6, 2012 9:08:33 PM

"The Samsung Magician software includes a portion for over provisioning." do you mean partition?
What i would say is reinstall the OS onto it and wipe everything, any software than comes on anything is usualy useless as you can find much better versions of what they have open source. It does sound like its just wasting space, as Windows creates whats called WinRE (Windows Recovery Environment) so you can reinstall/fix windows with out loosing data (like documents or music or save games).
To help what is over provisioning? look it up it probably wont speed your SSD up.
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January 6, 2012 9:32:10 PM

SpazldNinjaDude said:
To help what is over provisioning? look it up it probably wont speed your SSD up.


I can't tell if you are actually asking this question or are using that old instructor technique of asking a question to get me to research myself.
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 311 G Storage
January 6, 2012 10:41:57 PM

The overprovisioning feature of the Samsung SSD Magician allows a user to shrink or expand the logical volumes created on a Samsung SSD. In other words you can change the default overprovisioning if you want to. I recommend leaving it alone.

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January 6, 2012 10:42:16 PM

No Samsung 830 magicians out there ? Anyone have opinions on OP size and its affects on performance ?
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January 6, 2012 10:50:02 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
The overprovisioning feature of the Samsung SSD Magician allows a user to shrink or expand the logical volumes created on a Samsung SSD. In other words you can change the default overprovisioning if you want to. I recommend leaving it alone.


Exactly as i was thinking. 'Why mess with this, the drive will bet set up with the optimum volume'. But when I actually just looked at that function it displayed that my OP volume was 0. And had a recommended setting equal to 10%. That got me wondering it the OP came factory set, or updating (or whatever) changed it to 0 (or it was not factory set like I thought). Google was no help in this matter. So I turned to here.
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 311 G Storage
January 6, 2012 10:55:51 PM

Overprovisioning will not increase read performance. It doesn't do much of anything for write performance either.
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January 6, 2012 11:24:51 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
Overprovisioning will not increase read performance. It doesn't do much of anything for write performance either.


Hmmm. I guess leaving it at 0 is a legit option. Thanks, I have something to research and think on.
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 311 G Storage
January 7, 2012 12:11:05 AM

I've got the Samsung 470 SATA 2 3Gb/s 256GB ssd in my personal rig. Although the capacity is advertised as 256GB, the actual capacity is 238GB due to overprovisioning. Your 830 should also have a lower actual capacity but not necessarily the same as mine. The capacity used for overprovisioning varies for different brands and different models.
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February 25, 2012 1:30:45 PM

The instructions for the Samsung 830 says that they recommend that you set aside a OP equal to 7 to 10% of the SSD. It says reliability and read/write management is improved by this feature. Seems funny for Samsung to recommend it if it is already built into the system. I know my 256GB had 238GB usable which is about 7% once I got it set up from scratch. I know my old HHD would also take up some space once it was installed - so that for HHD and SSD I never got 100% of it to use.

In fact, here is what Samsung says in the documentation for their Samsung Magician SSD software:

The Over Provisioning menu provides options for resizing partitions on the disk. The SSD will perform better and last longer if it has free space available to use as swap space, and this utility will help you set aside such space by resizing the partitions on your drive. Swap space is used to perform routine SSD maintenance (TRIM and Garbage Collection) in the background during idle time, allowing the SSD Controller to prepare free blocks for the OS to use in the future. Because the SSD performs best when writing to free blocks, the result is a better user experience through reduced wait time. END

Their software said I had 0 set aside for OP when I ran it as well. A google search for SSD over provisioning clearly explains the benefits of this feature. Samsung says it contributes to a longer life SSD.

Since I have the space available, I just shrunk my C drive using Windows Disk Manager (under services) to create unallocated space, which is what OP uses. If the time comes when I need the space back, I will reclaim it. Since I am not interested in calling Samsung to find out - I am happy with this approach.
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February 25, 2012 5:27:25 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
Although the capacity is advertised as 256GB, the actual capacity is 238GB due to overprovisioning.

Actually that difference between 256GB and 238GB has nothing to do with overprovisioning, it is due to the way drive makers advertise size and how Windows reports size.

To a drive maker, 1GB = 1,000,000,000 (1,000^3)

To Windows 1GiB= 1,073,741,824 (1,024^3)

You can use a ratio of 93% to convert: 93% of 256GB = 238GiB

So, if Windows is reporting "238GB" (technically 238GiB), then you have no overprovisioning.


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February 25, 2012 6:17:43 PM

That is what I thought. Doing more google searches, it seems Samsung has left it up to the user to do any over provisioning, whereas some other makers account for this in other ways. So bottom line, it appears that the user, if he/she has the space using a Samsung 830, should set aside 7-10% for OP.
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March 12, 2012 2:28:04 AM

Wow there are a ton of people piping in on this who have no idea what they are talking about. It is a very good idea to over provision. Yes all drives come with some factory over provision but it is the minimum amount. The more you have the better it is. You can always go back in later and allocate some of the space you left unallocated if you need more room. It is much more difficult to unallocate space once you have been using it. Everything the Samsung site software said is true. It gives a larger pool for garbage collection to work with while idle. It also gives more free blocks to shift around for even wear leveling. It also helps speed up your drive...well keep your drive at maximum speed anyway. If you are only using the drive to transfer a few gigs worth of data a day then you dont need much op as you wouldn't have used up your pool but lets say you leave a pool of 30Gb unallocated but end up transferring 40Gb within a short period of time (a few hours) then you will be waiting on your hard drive to clean up and prepare 10Gb for you to use because it wasn't in your pool ready to go. This slows down the drive and causes it to reuse the blocks it just got. The usually op recomended amount is about 15-20% for a normal user and 20-30% for a power user or if you are using it as a gaming drive. I recommend giving it 30% to begin with and see how much you use in an average day over a month or so time. You can scale back according to your results.
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March 12, 2012 2:29:03 AM

I have always set op amount while installing windows so I don't know how well the Samsung software works for setting op once windows has already been installed.
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March 26, 2012 1:24:07 PM

My Samsung 830 512GB is partitioned with 0.1 GB IFS, 95.29 GB (C:) , and 381.55 GB (D:) .

I just used the Over Provisioning tool in the Magician software to set the recommend OP amount of 47.60 GB. This created 47.60 GB of "Unallocated" space at the end of the drive (after the D:)  partition.

My question is, does having a partitioned SSD make a difference where the OP Unallocated space is kept? In other words, is creating the OP Unallocated space after the D: partition any different to creating it after the C: partition, and will it still benefit the C: partition even though it's after the D: partition?

Many thanks.
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April 16, 2012 5:35:23 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
I've got the Samsung 470 SATA 2 3Gb/s 256GB ssd in my personal rig. Although the capacity is advertised as 256GB, the actual capacity is 238GB due to overprovisioning. Your 830 should also have a lower actual capacity but not necessarily the same as mine. The capacity used for overprovisioning varies for different brands and different models.



ARGH: This was NOT due to overprovisioning!!!

The difference between what the manufacturer reported, in your case 256GB and what the OS reports 238GB is ONLY due to the difference between how a manufacturer reports the size using 10^9 as a GB versus how the OS reports a GB using binary 2^30.

SO the manufacturer states 256GB which is 256 * 10^9 or 256 * 1,000,000,000 = 256,000,000,000 Bytes
Since the OS is using 2^30 or 1,073,741,824 the size the OS reports will be 256,000,000,000 / 1,073,741,824 = 238.42GB

This will be the same on ANY hard drive SSD or not and will be the same ratio on ACT hard drive regardless of size.
This has been true since hard-drives have been put in to computers!!!

If the SSD magician HAD created space on the drive you would have less than the 238GB as reported by the OS and you would see it as unallocated space in the Windows Disk Management Window.
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 311 G Storage
April 16, 2012 9:42:28 PM

According to Samsung their solid state drives are shipped with 7% reserved, the same as the GB to GiB conversion. The Samsung Magician allows you to configure the spare area reserved for background functions.

Pretty well documented in several published articles and technical reviews.

I'll have more info in a couple of hours.

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a b Ô Samsung
a c 311 G Storage
April 18, 2012 9:18:07 PM

I apologize for the delay in responding. I got side tracked quite a bit. Had to do a lot of research too and get confirmation for the following information.

I have confirmed that Samsung does in fact ship their ssd's with 7% capacity reserved for overprovisioning which is hidden from view, even in the Samsung SSD Magician.

When the Samsung SSD Magician shows 0% provisioning that actually means the standard factory 7% overprovisioning has not been expanded or contracted by the user. It is simply in the 7% default mode.

At the same time we also have a fairly new concept called 0% provisioning which first appeared in published articles about this time last year. Like the Samsung Magician 0% overprovisioning, the new concept should not be taken literally or at face value. These are situations where 0 does not mean 0.

The concept of 0% provisioning turned out to be very confusing for a lot of individuals. If I understood the information correctly the SSD manufacturers are using the standard unformatted to formatted ratio from hard disk drives to come up with a difference of 7.37%. That 7.37% is used for overprovisioning and a few other ssd features. As near as I can tell this is what Samsung, Intel, OCZ and other ssd companies are probably doing with their newest ssd's.



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April 20, 2012 9:44:23 AM

Hi All,

Can someone, please, reply to BuildBuildBuild's question above, I have the same situation and no idea whether it matters that I first partitioned my drives and then done the OP.

While, I'm here, anyone experienced anything like this before:
1: performance optimization doesn't run for me at all - which is very scary. First it can hardly find my Samsung 256gb 830 SSD then when it finds it, it doesn't want to run, saying it couldn't make connection to it, the only way I can do it is to hit the "Check All" button, then start but then straight away get an error message saying it couldn't run. Anyone had an issue like this before? Any idea why this could be? I'm running Win 7 by the way. I tried google but couldn't find anyone with the same problem, which is again very scary :S.

2: does it matter if my partition of C: is in 4k format but my second partition I formatted in 64k clusters? Does this matter or shall I re-install win7 and do 64k for C: as well?

Many Thanks,
SamsungOwner
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April 20, 2012 9:44:47 AM

Hi All,

Can someone, please, reply to BuildBuildBuild's question above, I have the same situation and no idea whether it matters that I first partitioned my drives and then done the OP.

While, I'm here, anyone experienced anything like this before:
1: performance optimization doesn't run for me at all - which is very scary. First it can hardly find my Samsung 256gb 830 SSD then when it finds it, it doesn't want to run, saying it couldn't make connection to it, the only way I can do it is to hit the "Check All" button, then start but then straight away get an error message saying it couldn't run. Anyone had an issue like this before? Any idea why this could be? I'm running Win 7 by the way. I tried google but couldn't find anyone with the same problem, which is again very scary :S.

2: does it matter if my partition of C: is in 4k format but my second partition I formatted in 64k clusters? Does this matter or shall I re-install win7 and do 64k for C: as well?

Many Thanks,
SamsungOwner
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 311 G Storage
April 20, 2012 2:42:22 PM

SamsungOwner

Straight from page 18 of the Magician User Manual:

Caution: Magician supports NTFS and raw (unformatted, unallocated) partitions only.

Last Friday Tom's Hardware published an article recommending sticking with Microsoft Windows NFTS if you are using your ssd as an internal drive and using Microsoft Windows as the operating system. A Samsung 830 series ssd is one of the ssd's that was used for the analysis. Here is a link to the article:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-file-system-ntf...

I'll do a little research about BuildBuildBuild's question.
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 311 G Storage
April 20, 2012 5:53:48 PM

BuildBuildBuild & SamsungOwner -

I have an answer. Over Provisioning is for the entire solid state drive. It is not for individual partitions. If you already partitioned the ssd, then the Samsung Magician will give you a choice of which partition to expand or contract. For example if you have a C: and a D: partition you get to choose which partion to shrink so that more space can be used for Over Provisioning the entire ssd.

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April 21, 2012 1:11:29 AM

It sounds like there is provisioning and over-provisioning.

Re the provisioning, is it a real xs area of the ssd, or is it virtual? I would imagine it is virtual.

Similarly, are the partitions separate areas of the SSD hardware or is it all virtual? Viz., if you had C: and D: partitions and you did a massive amount of writing to D: only, would would there still be wear leveling throughout the drive or would the D: partition just fail one day while the C: partition still functioned?

Not meaning to derail, just to understand.
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June 16, 2012 8:12:07 PM

SamsungOwner said:
Hi All,

Can someone, please, reply to BuildBuildBuild's question above, I have the same situation and no idea whether it matters that I first partitioned my drives and then done the OP.

While, I'm here, anyone experienced anything like this before:
1: performance optimization doesn't run for me at all - which is very scary. First it can hardly find my Samsung 256gb 830 SSD then when it finds it, it doesn't want to run, saying it couldn't make connection to it, the only way I can do it is to hit the "Check All" button, then start but then straight away get an error message saying it couldn't run. Anyone had an issue like this before? Any idea why this could be? I'm running Win 7 by the way. I tried google but couldn't find anyone with the same problem, which is again very scary :S.

2: does it matter if my partition of C: is in 4k format but my second partition I formatted in 64k clusters? Does this matter or shall I re-install win7 and do 64k for C: as well?

Many Thanks,
SamsungOwner


I am also experiencing these problems when try to optimize through SSD magician. Although I have no real issues with this SSD it scared me a bit too. But the explanation by JohnyLucky did give me some trust back and having 7% OP above the default 7% seems enough to me.

Another Samsong Owner. (SSD 830)
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October 10, 2012 5:44:42 AM

my 120GB Samsung 830 was freezing my pc every time i played borderlands 2 (awesome game) and i had to do a hard reset many times until i used the OP feature in magician software. hasn't frozen since. praise Jesus
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November 13, 2013 2:37:19 AM

I am also a Samsung Evo 250Gb SSD owner and have a question (Sorry for high jacking). If I do this OP to 10% and I already have this drive as my master and already cloned and in use, Will it wipe all my data and will I have to do a fresh install of my os + apps or will it just allocate more space for the SSD and not change anything but make it a smaller SSD? Sorry for the noob question- kinda confused lol...
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November 13, 2013 8:21:53 AM

xXJakeXx said:
I am also a Samsung Evo 250Gb SSD owner and have a question (Sorry for high jacking). If I do this OP to 10% and I already have this drive as my master and already cloned and in use, Will it wipe all my data and will I have to do a fresh install of my os + apps or will it just allocate more space for the SSD and not change anything but make it a smaller SSD? Sorry for the noob question- kinda confused lol...


When I increased my OP on my 830 128, there was no problem. I believe this is because the SSD is constantly moving things around anyway, so it just takes the XS from what is not being used. Of course, YMMV.
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January 2, 2014 2:23:15 PM

I have the 840 EVO 120GB and my read/write went from 207/201 Mbps to 620/458 Mbps after enabling: high performance, RAPID Mode, OS Optimization and Over Provisioning. The biggest increase was after enabling OP (283/253 Mbps -> 620/458). All of this was done after enabling AHCI Mode in Win 7 and in the BIOS.
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January 31, 2014 6:13:36 PM

SpazldNinjaDude said:
"The Samsung Magician software includes a portion for over provisioning." do you mean partition?
What i would say is reinstall the OS onto it and wipe everything, any software than comes on anything is usualy useless as you can find much better versions of what they have open source. It does sound like its just wasting space, as Windows creates whats called WinRE (Windows Recovery Environment) so you can reinstall/fix windows with out loosing data (like documents or music or save games).
To help what is over provisioning? look it up it probably wont speed your SSD up.


the set Op is about 10% that works out very well. do not try to get any crap online or you will corrupt the drive. Try setting it at 12% and you might get about 300 to 2000 ops on your random read/write speed but Samsung knows what they are doing with the drive. Go to the "Overprovisioning"settings and click on the custom then put it at what you want, then check your benchmarks. DO NOT CHANGE IT MUCH
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February 17, 2014 5:14:23 AM

If the Size is advertised as, lets say 128gb like mine, the real size is about 119gb. It the exakt same thing as with mechanical drives. Gigabit and gigabyte or whatever. Not because of OP. This is just as it always has been. Take the Advertised size, 128/1.074=119.2gb. So, if one wants to set up OP and the drive has no room set a side, does one need to shrink 10gb of the drive?
I am more interested in lifespan than speed in this case. My little poor SSD har written over 11TB of data and has lost something like 35-40% write speed. Want to keep it alive as long as possible. It still reads over 500mb/s witch is the important part for me.
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February 17, 2014 9:39:29 AM

I would use an exterior drive. Do you still have the drive that you replaced? Hopefully you hung onto it. Get an external housing for it and start saving all of your files, pics, music, and especially videos on it. This will free up the ssd and improve the read and write speeds. The other added benefit will be having a backup of all the files because most ssd's will start to crash or corrupt data when they are too slammed. If you don't have the drive look into getting a housing and a 7200rpm drive to put into it. For me this way has proven to be more convenient and also allows more functions to be completed in less time.
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 252 G Storage
February 17, 2014 12:27:51 PM

Quote:
So, if one wants to set up OP and the drive has no room set a side, does one need to shrink 10gb of the drive?


Yes. Delete/uninstall data until you have at least 10% free space and then set that as OP. I have 25 GB of "Unallocated Space" on my 128 GB Samsung 840 Pro.

Yogi
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February 19, 2014 4:35:14 PM

Ok. Thank you. =)
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February 19, 2014 6:01:54 PM

New issue. I have like 50gb free on my SSD since removing some of my games and such. But the storage manager will only let me shrink like 2.5gb of it. Does not make any sense to me?
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 252 G Storage
February 20, 2014 6:19:16 AM

What is "Storage Mgr."? Never heard of it.

Have you tried Windows "Disk Management"?

Yogi
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February 25, 2014 7:44:01 AM

Y0GI said:
What is "Storage Mgr."? Never heard of it.

Have you tried Windows "Disk Management"?

Yogi


Yeah. That is the same thing. Win 8 in swedish.
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 252 G Storage
February 25, 2014 1:21:07 PM

Enable "Show hidden files and folders"
Disable Hibernation
Shrink your Pagefile, and try again.

Yogi
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February 26, 2014 4:49:25 PM

Pagefile is only 1.6gb (12gb of ram) and Hiberfile.sys is one of the first things I remove. =) Weird thing is that I had 55gb free but could only shrink 2gb so I did not do it. Want to free up 10gb. Putting the drive in a fresh APU build, dad´s 50th birthday tomorrow. Want to maximize the lifespan since it already have written A LOT of data. Still works really well and will kick the current mechanical disks ass. =)
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a b Ô Samsung
a c 252 G Storage
February 27, 2014 9:22:04 AM

Do you have pagefile set to min. and max. at 1.6 GB or is it set to administer by system? What about hidden files and folders? Restore points?

Yogi
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July 15, 2014 7:10:29 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
I have confirmed that Samsung does in fact ship their ssd's with 7% capacity reserved for overprovisioning which is hidden from view, even in the Samsung SSD Magician.

When the Samsung SSD Magician shows 0% provisioning that actually means the standard factory 7% overprovisioning has not been expanded or contracted by the user. It is simply in the 7% default mode.


This does not make sense. My 128GB Samsung 840 Pro shows 119.24GB usable in my OS. This is the 93% "1024" byte conversion that all drives are subject to. If what you say is true, then I should only have ~110.28GB of usable space. Where did you get this source of Samsung already "factory" over-provisioning SSD's?
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July 17, 2014 10:43:18 PM

brian_boy said:
JohnnyLucky said:
I have confirmed that Samsung does in fact ship their ssd's with 7% capacity reserved for overprovisioning which is hidden from view, even in the Samsung SSD Magician.

When the Samsung SSD Magician shows 0% provisioning that actually means the standard factory 7% overprovisioning has not been expanded or contracted by the user. It is simply in the 7% default mode.


This does not make sense. My 128GB Samsung 840 Pro shows 119.24GB usable in my OS. This is the 93% "1024" byte conversion that all drives are subject to. If what you say is true, then I should only have ~110.28GB of usable space. Where did you get this source of Samsung already "factory" over-provisioning SSD's?


Hi Brian, I am going to break down the mathematics for you. The previous user is correct in that Samsung already uses 7% of space for Overprovisioning. Here is how it works, but you have to understand the difference between GB and GiB, which I explain below.

Your drive STARTS with 128GiBs of space at the factory (this is 128GiB of memory based on powers of two, so 1024 Bytes = 1 KiB, 1024KiB = 1 MiByte, 1024MiB = 1GiB, and so on ). 7% off of that for the provisioning that is done in the factory. After that, you have:

128 * .93 (this is 7% off the total capacity that is done at the factory) = 119.04MiB

Which is roughly what you are seeing in your OS and is very close to the 119.24GiB that you mentioned. Note there is slight error in calculation, because every drive has a slightly different size (Even though the OS shows 119.24GB, it actually means 119.24GiB)

If you scale this number up to what you see on the box (128GB), you have to turn your GiB into B, and then into GB. Here is the calculation.

119.24GiB * 1024 ^3 (turns GiB into B (Bytes) = 128,032,975,093.76 B (bytes)

Now we will turn it into GB (powers of 1000, not 1024 as in GiB)

128,032,975,093.76 / 1000^3 = 128.03GB = Approx 128GB

The 128GB is what you see on the BOX when you buy it. So you can see that the unit still has 128GB, and still has the 7% over-provisioning still built into the drive.

the Samsung Magician software just allows you to add even more space to Over Provision than what was already setup at the factory.

Hope this helps.

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July 18, 2014 1:21:49 AM

UncleBiscuits79 said:

The 128GB is what you see on the BOX when you buy it. So you can see that the unit still has 128GB, and still has the 7% over-provisioning still built into the drive.


I'm aware of the GiB to GB conversion. All drives are subject to the conversion, not just Samsung SSD's. I did a small amount of research and here's what the horse's mouth has to say about the situation:

Samsung said:
the 840 PRO will not feature mandatory OP


Let's look at other drives, like my 1TB Hitache "deathstar" that's still running like a pro since 2008. My OS sees 931GiB of usable space. Quoting howtogeek,
Quote:
To a hard disk manufacturer, one KB is 1000 bytes
Using the same 1024 conversion factor as above, we get:

1,000,000,000,000/(1024^3) = 931.32GiB.

From your post let's apply what you're saying to this HDD. Are you saying there's some part of 68.68GB that the OS is using on this HDD as "unallocated swap space" or some other over-provisioning "work bench" that the OS can use for garbage collection and trim support? Or, are these "extra/lost" GB simply due to the 1024 conversion process and this explains the discrepancy between what's advertised on the box and what the OS is seeing -- and these GB never existed as "unallocated swap space" in the first place?

When I over-provision the Samsung SSD to the recommended setting of 10%, am I actually over-provisioning it to 17%? 17% of what -- 128,000,000,000 bytes?

OR...a third option I just thought of and think you might have eluded to...did Samsung secretly put in ~9GB of extra nand cells strictly hard-coded for 7% over-provisioning -- and didn't advertise this extra space on the box? That would definitely explain this "factory" over-provisioning.

Does anyone else have input on this?
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July 18, 2014 2:01:49 AM

You know I'm starting to think this was my fault for bumping old threads with potentially out-of-date information. I tend to do this a lot and should force myself to not bump threads anymore.

AlbusDlx (earlier in this thread) noticed the same thing as me and his post was also recent from February. I bumped something JohnnyLucky said in 2012 and probably is true for drives previous to the 840 Pro. Apparently even the 840 "standard" drives are subject to mandatory OP so I would assume a lower reported total space would show up for those earlier drives. It looks to me like Samsung was confident enough to not force mandatory OP on the 840 Pro's because of the drive's ecc 3-bit nand cells and better overall quality (also hence a 5-year warranty.) I can only assume as well they were getting a lot of support tickets during that time asking about, "where's my drive space?!", especially on...say a 64 or 128GB drive where space is already limited and Magician not showing anything.

I'm sorry.
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August 1, 2014 10:24:16 AM

brian_boy said:

AlbusDlx (earlier in this thread) noticed the same thing as me and his post was also recent from February. I bumped something JohnnyLucky said in 2012 and probably is true for drives previous to the 840 Pro.



Researching OP on a 250GB Samsung 840 EVO SSD. After reading the posts by JohnnyLucky I've concluded that I'm going to doubt anything he has said until verified by my own research. He sites a lot of "checking", but provides no references to support his claims that go against conventional knowledge of how SSD's are provisioned.

rbs
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August 1, 2014 12:37:39 PM

ryanbseattle said:

After reading the posts by JohnnyLucky I've concluded that I'm going to doubt anything he has said until verified by my own research.


@ryanbseattle,
When browsing the internet for software and hardware-related problems, there tends to be an overflow of guesswork, beliefs, subjective information, non-sourced information, and non-thorough information especially from users with high post counts and also from many users who've been awarded "expert" and "pro" badges. I've noticed a lot of mods who do this as well -- it seems to be an all-too-common knee-jerk reaction to simply post for the sake of posting, instead of actually providing information. Ironically, the "best answers" usually come from users with very low post counts -- someone who you can tell was so annoyed at the situation that he decided to take the effort of making a new account and talk about a specific problem at length and never visit the forum again once the problem is resolved. I'm not accusing Tom's Hardware of anything, I know and appreciate a lot of users are here, but the forum still is vulnerable to aggregate "groupthink" that makes resolving an issue difficult without a significant amount of time spent reading through noise. Take a look at my profile when I bumped a thread about Prime95 some time ago to see what exactly I'm talking about (this is when I first made my account here.) A lot of the time I wish companies like Samsung would hire English-major consultants who would make user manuals that describe many things with crystal-clear detail and explanations, but I know that's just a dream I occasionally laugh at.

Anandtech says the 840 EVO has default OP while CNET says it doesn't. Out of curiosity, what does the OP section in your Magician say? 250GB "manufacturer" should be 232.83GiB "OS" and then theoretically 7% of "invisible default OP" taken off that should be 216.53GiB reportable total space available to the OS. I would say that if you see 232.83GiB in multiple places then go ahead and do the recommended amount of OP in the OP section of Magician.

I went on youtube and found a British kid install his 120GB EVO, with his reportable space on the drive (don't ask me how long I finally found something specific like this) and heard that it was 111GiB (versus a calculated 103.94GiB if default OP was in effect) so my "educated guess" is that Samsung has decided against default OP on this drive as well. The British have never failed me at their skill of being thorough, now I know why MI6 rivals anything else the world has to offer :) 

10/10, would analyze again.
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August 19, 2014 10:50:37 AM

All SSDs have factory reserved space. This factory reserved space is NOT available to the user and can NOT be changed. It does NOT show in Samsung Magician. This reserved space is needed for wear leveling and such.

Over-provisioning is used to increase the spare area and is in addition to the factory reserved space. Over-provisioning can increase the life expectancy of a drive (and sometimes performance also), but really is not needed unless you do a LOT of writing to the drive.

With most consumer SSDs the factory reserved space is about 7%.

Like RAM chips, most flash chips are made with capacities that are a power of 2 (although some new chips coming out may get away from this). So the actual total size of the drive (including the factory reserved space that is hidden from the user) will usually be a power of 1024 bytes. For example a 256GB SSD will actually have 256x1024x1024x1024 total bytes. But the user only has access to around 256x1000x1000x1000. The difference is used for factory reserved space.

Sandforce based drives are somewhat different. Sandforce based drives store the data on the drive compressed. Because of this they not only have factory reserved space for wear leveling, but additional factory reserved space for checksums. So a Sandforce 240GB drive will still have 256x1024x1024x1024 total bytes, but like 16x1024x1024x1024 bytes will be reserved for checksums, and then about 7% for wear leveling. This leaves around 240x1000x1000x1000 for the user.

In windows the size of a 256GB SSD will be reported as 256x(1000x1000x1000)/(1024x1024x1024) or around 238GiB.
240GB SSD will be 240x(1000x1000x100)/(1024x1024x1024) or around 223GiB.
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August 19, 2014 12:06:15 PM

Indeed there is a LOT of miss-information on over-provisioning. For example, ALL SSDs have factory reserved 'spare area' reserved for wear leveling and such. This factory reserved area is not available to the user and should NOT be referred to as over-provisioning. Yet is often is.

The factory reserved spare area has already been provisioned, over-provisioning is increasing the spare area beyond what has already been provisioned. That is why it has the 'over' in front.

I have a PC build guide magazine from MAXIMUMPC. In in it says that a 256GB SSD has no over-provisioning and a 240GB SSD has 16GB over-provisioning. This is just NOT accurate at all. Both have about 7% factory reserved spare area, but most 240GB drives have Sandforce controllers which have additional factory reserved area for checksums.

256GB will have like 274.88GB total (256x1024^3/1000^3), around 18.88GB system reserved and 256GB available to the user (windows will report this as around 238GB, but it is really 256GB or 238GiB).

240GB (Sandforce controller) will also have like 274.88GB total. Like 17-18GB system reserved for checksums and another 17-18GB system reserved for spare area. Leaving 240GB Available to the user (windows will report this as around 223.5GB, but it is really 240GB or 223.5GiB).

Windows has always used 1KB=1024 bytes, 1MB=1024KB or 1048576 bytes, and 1GB=1024MB or 1073741824 bytes.
This is not correct, as 1KB=1000 bytes, 1MB=1000KB, and 1GB=1000MB.
But the terms KiB, MiB, and GiB were not around when Microsoft started writing operating systems. So when windows reports KB, MB, or GB it really means KiB, MiB, and GiB.
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