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The PSU Ranked List and Guide

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a b ) Power supply
March 23, 2010 1:37:17 AM

This guide is now replaced by this guide:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/324368-28-computer-po...


There are many factors that must be considered when selecting a PSU, or Power Supply Unit, when building a new PC or replacing a bad PSU. If you are reading this you probably understand that you want a safe PSU, one that won't fail and damage your components in the process. What you may not understand is the difficulty of diagnosing a PSU that has partly failed.
A poor or slightly damaged PSU can cause a system to display a wide range of symptoms which also resemble other issues. It can be almost impossible to diagnose a PSU problem at home without having another PSU to swap into a build. This is a very strong argument for getting a quality PSU... you need to have as much confidence as possible in this part because of the difficulties caused by a bad one.

If you would like to learn about power supplies and what makes a good one, here are some links. Be warned, it's not something you'll pick up in 10 minutes.

Hardwaresecrets.com - Everything You Need to Know About Power Supplies
jonnyguru.com - Power Supply FAQ
TechSupportForum.com - Power supply information and selection


Here are a few links to help you determine how much power you will NEED in your computer:

Atomic MPC forum - Mark84's extensive graph showing power usage of almost any gaming GPU from the last several years.
As the GPU is the largest single load on your PSU, this table can take you a long ways in determining your needs.

Extreme Outervision power estimator This is the most used and best of these tools, but it uses wattage not 12V amps.

Once you figure out how much power you NEED, you still should determine how much you WANT. Opinions vary on this, and it's a good way to start an argument on the boards... but I will say this: Buy a quality PSU that will last you for many years and cover any eventuality you can reasonably predict.

DATABASE KEY ONLY Click on this graphic to learn how the database works! This is not THE database.


Key:
A - Rank - This is the relative quality of the PSU. If a PSU does not have a rank, ASK on the boards. However, it probably means that no good reviews exist of the PSU, just poorly done ones.
*Rank 1 never has more than 5 units in a given power range, and is the best. Almost all units in this rank should be fully modular.
*Rank 2 has PSUs that are almost as good as those in rank 1. Maybe they were bumped out of rank one, or maybe they were placed there because of similarities to former rank 1 units.
*Rank 3 has PSUs that are good, passing all tests, but not remarkable, or with minor flaws.
*Rank 4 has PSUs that don't really meet standards and have minor flaws. Often they can be OK as long as you don't load them up too much. This is here for folks that may not have access to better PSUs.
*Rank 5 is to be avoided at all costs.

B - Model - We try to be specific here. If you find more than one PSU fitting the model number, ASK US.

C - 80Plus - There are 4 levels of efficiency ranging from Standard to Gold. The more efficient a PSU is, the more money it will save on the electricity bill. If no 80Plus grade is given it's probably because it never got certified or is inefficient. There is now also 80Plus Platinum.

Glossary
Here is a glossary of common terms used in this list:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/279124-28-glossary-co...

Below are links to the actual database, broken down into power ranges so you do not have to wade through the entire database.

The 12V amp ranges What do I mean by 12V amp range and how do we figure it out? See the third post in this thread.
These ranges are arbitrary. There is no hard rule saying where the line is for each category... we have simply tried to group them so that you have an easier time picking something. Here is a brief description of what we think each power range is best suited for, followed by a link to that portion of the list. (See note A in the following post)

21 amps and below
This range is not recommended for the average home builder. While you may build a system that uses less than 21 amps, there is no good reason to restrict yourself to something so weak when the next range will have higher quality and longer lasting units.

22-34 amps - Often "400W" PSUs
This is the range of power you need for the modern basic office machine or simple HTPC. Any PC with lower powered graphics, only a few fans and hard drives, etc.
http://rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com/publish/rankedpsulist...

35-42 amps - Often "550W" PSUs
This is the range that many gaming computers will use. Can support most single video cards but not all. Can support 2 lower power video cards although usually the next range is better for those.
http://rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com/publish/rankedpsulist...

43-54 amps - Often "650W" PSUs
This range is a good choice for the gamer with two moderate video cards or one very high power card. Start adding in a lot of hard drives, fans, water-cooling... and you might be more comfortable in the next range, especially with moderate overclocks of the CPU and GPU(s).
http://rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com/publish/rankedpsulist...

55-64 amps - Often "750W" PSUs
This range will be fine for most systems with two larger video cards and the usual assortment of gaming parts. It might also be a good range for those just wanting room to grow into whatever. It cannot handle everything however - there are limits.
http://rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com/publish/rankedpsulist...

65-75 amps - Often "850W" PSUs
This range is enough for just about anything. Two large overclocked video cards, a well overclocked CPU, a large RAID, fans & lighting, this range can handle it.
http://rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com/publish/rankedpsulist...

76 or more amps - Often "1000W" or "1200W" PSUs
This range is large and covers the rest. If you have 3 large video cards you may need this much. FOUR large GPUs, TWO water-cooling loops, 8 fans, 8 hard drives? Or maybe you just want to keep that option open? Then you need something like this.
http://rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com/publish/rankedpsulist...

If you have general questions about this guide and list, or suggestions for it, feel free to make them here. If you want specific help about your build or intended PSU, ask in a new thread please.

More about : psu ranked list guide

a b ) Power supply
March 23, 2010 1:38:12 AM

Note A:
Figures for 12V amps come from labels where possible, or sometimes reviews. While needed for comparison, it should be noted that when placed in a modern computer it may not be possible to meet the stated maximum. This is because some of the total available power is being used by the other rails. For instance, a PSU may only be capable of 600W total but can supposedly supply all 600W, or 50 amps, as 12V power. Since the computer does need some 3.3V and 5V power, the actual possible 12V power available is somewhat lower than 50 amps.
a b ) Power supply
March 23, 2010 1:38:19 AM

What is a "12V amp range"?

A PSU can deliver different kinds of power, but MOST of the power that a modern computer needs is the 12 volt DC kind.

So when you are looking for a power supply for a modern computer, your main interest is how much 12V power it can deliver. The 12V power comes on either a single rail (channel if you like) or multiple rails. Some major PSUs have just one rail and some have many... there is no clear right and wrong there, despite what the various companies may claim.


Let's look at a fake PSU label, so that we can see what it all means:




You'll notice the part we are really interested in is circled in red.

This particular PSU has two rails, apparently. They could be lying but we'll believe them. 12V1 and 12V2.

12V1, according to the chart, can deliver up to 30 amps. If more than that is drawn from this rail, it's supposed to shut down (If it's a good PSU).

12V2, according to the chart, can deliver up to 28 amps. Any more and it's supposed to shut down.

12V1 and 12V2 CANNOT deliver 58 amps combined. Very important. This is ONLY a statement of the maximum each rail can hit BY ITSELF.

We know that amps x voltage = wattage. 58A x 12V = 696W... but this is only a 640W PSU.

Jimbo has told us what these two rails are actually capable of though, and it's 520W.
All we have to do is apply the formula we just learned in reverse:

520W / 12V = 43.33 so we'll just say 43 amps of 12V power

There you have it, that is how we get the ranges for our database and how we know where a PSU fits with others. We ignore the claimed total wattage and focus on how many 12V amps a PSU can actually deliver to you computer... because that's what matters most.

Related resources
a c 77 ) Power supply
March 24, 2010 1:24:05 AM

Reserved, if needed (Give Right to Mod to Delete Post for extra space for Proximon)

Great starting point... sKora, you and the rest of the gang have put a great list together. I wish I've been able to add in more PSU than I did.
a b ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 7:28:02 PM

Some more work has been done.
March 26, 2010 12:47:19 PM

Does this mean that every psu quoted in the ''PSU Ranked List'' is a good psu and ok to use?? :o 
a b ) Power supply
March 26, 2010 12:53:35 PM

Starges said:
Does this mean that every psu quoted in the ''PSU Ranked List'' is a good psu and ok to use?? :o 



If you read the list you will see it will tell you if the power supply failed and how it fails also click to the reveiws will give you even more info on them.


I love that list its a great list of reveiws for PSU.
March 26, 2010 12:53:52 PM

dont think so,

eg:

Ultra X4 1200 Would make a good 65amp 12v unit (950w or so) if priced accordingly


so that unit is not exactly getting good outlooks
March 26, 2010 1:08:23 PM

what does''no APFC'' mean?
March 26, 2010 1:14:58 PM

Starges said:
what does''no APFC'' mean?



"Active Power Correction Factor"
March 26, 2010 1:28:37 PM

So that means it means it has a switch at the back for that?
March 26, 2010 2:39:37 PM

It means that the PSU has circuitry that automatically corrects for efficiency under load.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_factor_correction


Quote:
An "active power factor corrector" (active PFC) is a power electronic system that controls the amount of power drawn by a load in order to obtain a power factor as close as possible to unity. In most applications, the active PFC controls the input current of the load so that the current waveform is proportional to the mains voltage waveform (a sine wave). The purpose of making the power factor as close to unity (1) as possible is to make the load circuitry that is power factor corrected appear purely resistive (apparent power equal to real power).[12] In this case, the voltage and current are in phase and the reactive power consumption is zero. This enables the most efficient delivery of electrical power from the power company to the consumer.[13]


Specifications taken from the packaging of a 610W PC power supply showing Active PFC ratingSome types of active PFC are:

Boost
Buck
Buck-boost
Active power factor correctors can be single-stage or multi-stage.

In the case of a switched-mode power supply, a boost converter is inserted between the bridge rectifier and the main input capacitors. The boost converter attempts to maintain a constant DC bus voltage on its output while drawing a current that is always in phase with and at the same frequency as the line voltage. Another switchmode converter inside the power supply produces the desired output voltage from the DC bus. This approach requires additional semiconductor switches and control electronics, but permits cheaper and smaller passive components. It is frequently used in practice. For example, SMPS with passive PFC can achieve power factor of about 0.7–0.75, SMPS with active PFC, up to 0.99 power factor, while a SMPS without any power factor correction has a power factor of only about 0.55–0.65.[14]

Due to their very wide input voltage range, many power supplies with active PFC can automatically adjust to operate on AC power from about 100 V (Japan) to 230 V (Europe). That feature is particularly welcome in power supplies for laptops.

With the rising cost of energy and concerns over the efficient delivery of power, active PFC has become more common in consumer electronics.[15] Current Energy Star guidelines for computers (ENERGY STAR® Program Requirements for Computers Version 5.0) call for a power factor of ≥ 0.9 at 100% of rated output in the PC's power supply. According to a white paper authored by Intel and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency‎, PCs with internal power supplies will require the use of active power factor correction to meet the ENERGY STAR® 5.0 Program Requirements for Computers.[16]
a c 77 ) Power supply
March 26, 2010 3:18:45 PM

Starges said:
Does this mean that every psu quoted in the ''PSU Ranked List'' is a good psu and ok to use?? :o 

You need to look at the ranking in the "PSU Ranked List" to determine if the PSU is good or not..

Good, Better, Best List... IMO
  • Rank 1 never has more than 5 units in a given power range, and is the best. Best
  • Rank 2 has PSUs that are almost as good as those in rank 1. Maybe they were bumped out of rank one, or maybe they were placed there because of similarities to former rank 1 units. Better
  • Rank 3 has PSUs that are good, passing all tests, but not remarkable. Good

    Not Recommend for most part... IMO
  • Rank 4 has PSUs that don't really meet standards or may have minor flaws. Often they can be OK as long as you don't load them up too much. This is here for folks that may not have access to better PSUs.
  • Rank 5 is to be avoided at all costs.
    a b ) Power supply
    March 27, 2010 6:12:48 AM

    Starges said:
    what does''no APFC'' mean?



    I'm glad you asked that. I see that if I'm going to use technical terms in the list I had better supply a glossary.
    a b ) Power supply
    March 30, 2010 10:42:31 PM

    There we go, some more changes and glossary has been started.
    May 18, 2010 1:26:12 PM

    Thank u very much for ur help.

    i m trying to get all ur info s .

    & i'll obviously like to follow ur words.

    Thanks again
    a b ) Power supply
    May 24, 2010 8:25:29 AM

    This is getting there.
    a b ) Power supply
    May 24, 2010 1:16:47 PM

    huh? where the database of psus?
    a b ) Power supply
    May 25, 2010 12:32:26 AM

    Follow the links
    a b ) Power supply
    May 25, 2010 2:05:17 AM

    I was thinking Proximon maybe combining this into my sticky if you want?
    a b ) Power supply
    May 25, 2010 6:21:20 AM

    You're welcome to link to this guide.
    a b ) Power supply
    May 25, 2010 1:59:23 PM

    Thank you I will.
    a b ) Power supply
    June 2, 2010 3:31:09 AM

    Some updates made.
    a b ) Power supply
    June 17, 2010 1:34:04 AM

    Bump.
    a b ) Power supply
    July 29, 2010 1:17:49 AM

    Note added to explain how we arrive at the 12V amps figures.
    August 8, 2010 2:34:27 AM

    Nice.
    September 3, 2010 6:52:42 AM

    To buy a PSU ,first of all, consider the physical needs, you must meet up your diet in your case. People who give this requirement can sometimes buy a device that is too large or too small for his accommodation. And regarding to dimension, ensure that the width, length and height of the power supply you buy will fit your case to those cases.
    a b ) Power supply
    September 3, 2010 6:55:23 AM

    Thanks nelsonnebraska, I see I need to add a bit about form factor and dimensions.
    a b ) Power supply
    September 3, 2010 9:01:09 PM

    Yep we're slipping lately. Not many reviews for those but I'll try to expand the lists soon.
    a c 77 ) Power supply
    September 3, 2010 10:13:33 PM

    Proximon,

    Don't forget to add in the new Corsair AX models. From what I've seen, they look very promising :) 
    a b ) Power supply
    September 15, 2010 1:15:22 AM

    Updates made.
    a c 248 ) Power supply
    September 15, 2010 1:55:01 AM

    ^ Terrific! I've got a lot of catching up to do.
    a b ) Power supply
    September 15, 2010 1:58:46 AM

    There's still plenty of room for editors :)  It's a lot of work.
    a c 274 ) Power supply
    September 15, 2010 3:44:23 PM

    Nice work Proximon!
    Excellent!:) 
    a b ) Power supply
    September 20, 2010 8:18:52 PM

    A few more added today. The 60A range will just have to have 7 rank 1 units for a bit. I can't decide what to mark down.... I might possibly just move the bar up.
    a c 274 ) Power supply
    September 20, 2010 9:42:07 PM

    Proximon said:
    There's still plenty of room for editors :)  It's a lot of work.

    PM me i'd like to contribute.
    a b ) Power supply
    October 11, 2010 6:29:38 AM

    aford10, I still have no review of that PSU to go off. I understand that the 750W version is good, but that's a very different PSU.

    I think there was a 450W that was OK also, but while it was the same platform I was worried about it being able to handle 550W (as I recall... a bit vaguely).

    If you can find a review with at least an internal shot and a few multimeter readings I'll take a stab at it.

    On another note I have made a few small changes. The graphic with the key was confusing, and once someone spoke up I realized the issue.
    The DB itself of course is updated constantly.
    a b ) Power supply
    October 11, 2010 8:42:53 PM

    Thanks :)  I've started a discussion over at jg, and it looks almost identical to the OCZ MXS models... so it's probably going to be OK.
    a b ) Power supply
    October 11, 2010 8:55:15 PM

    Ya, it's similar. It seems to have a little beefier 12v rails, and a lower price than the MXS models. That's the reason I recommend this particular model.
    October 13, 2010 2:29:17 AM

    Is this a good psu it was not on the guides.

    a b ) Power supply
    October 13, 2010 3:02:09 AM

    I don't have a good review of that one, but it's probably not very good. Not a bad PSU though. Not really a 950W where it counts... 67 amps on the 12V is what you would expect from an 850W unit.

    So the Corsair 850TX would be a better deal if you actually need that much power.

    This is a review of the RX850-S-B and for most purposes this 950W is the same thing.
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...
    October 14, 2010 3:34:34 PM

    just me or is your 65-74AMP range link not working?
    good guide: how long has this been planned for?
    a c 77 ) Power supply
    October 14, 2010 4:07:10 PM

    micky_lund.... I think it is the rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com site that is having issues. I haven't been able to log on to any of them at the moment. I never had an issue before. :) 
    a b ) Power supply
    October 14, 2010 10:30:22 PM

    micky_lund said:
    just me or is your 65-74AMP range link not working?
    good guide: how long has this been planned for?


    I think the database is OK now.

    I started thinking about this about a year ago now. Here is a link to early discussions over at jg
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6189

    I got the beta version up in November
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/270297-28-ranked-list

    Skora did the very large and difficult 76+ range, and I have done the majority of the rest. I've had some other volunteers that have put in some time, but it's a big job and can be a bit overwhelming.

    I do best when I get very organized and start stepping through a newegg list unit by unit...

    I very much wish I had a search engine for all the major PSU review sites in one place.

    For those interested, this is my PSU research bookmark folder:

    PSU

    http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/showthread.php?t=...
    http://www.ocforums.com/showthread.php?t=589708
    http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/template/LISEXT/1FRA...
    http://www.80plus.org/manu/psu/psu_join.aspx
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDArticles&op...
    http://forums.guru3d.com/showthread.php?t=205763
    http://www.techsupportforum.com/hardware-support/ram-po...
    http://rankedpsulist.dabbledb.com/dabble/rankedpsulist?...
    (This would be the portal for editors)
    http://forums.atomicmpc.com.au/index.php?showtopic=264
    http://www.thelab.gr/showthread.php?t=82874
    http://www.overclock.net/power-supplies/738097-psu-revi...
    http://www.newegg.com/
    a b ) Power supply
    November 20, 2010 8:58:38 AM

    Dabble has recently had some outages, but it's accessible to editors again.
    !