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Windows on SSD, but HDD localdrive C?

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January 9, 2012 8:25:10 PM

As it says i want to have windows on a ssd but make my hdd to my C: drive because it's easier to control installations this way so that i do not get unnecessary stuff on there. Is this possible?

Thank you in advance!
a c 317 G Storage
January 9, 2012 8:58:50 PM

I would suggest that, while possible, installing Windows 7 to a drive other than C: as the SOLE OS would not be a good idea.

Basically, Win 7 installs the SRP, which then labels the OS partition that is created the C: drive by default. You will undoubtedly have significant issues arise, either now or in the future that will make you wish you had not made this choice.

Just use mental discipline when you install programs and direct them to your HDD, D: E: or whatever, it's really not that difficult compared to what you may face later.
January 10, 2012 6:11:32 AM

But already, 4 days after installation my drive is full of things(30g/60+OS) i would not like to have there. And all user content goes there automatically, appdata, temp files. It fills it up pretty quickly!
Related resources
a c 317 G Storage
January 10, 2012 7:57:42 AM

So change the TMP and TEMP file locations like THIS.

You can also change other folder locations like THIS and THIS.

Between those you should be able to move most everything that changes a lot.
January 10, 2012 12:22:22 PM

Thank you! I will try those (and also move my program files) later and then come back to you!
January 10, 2012 1:47:08 PM

I used this How to to setup my SSD as a boot drive with all the Users/Temp/Download folders on my secondary HDD.

Just make sure you read through it thoroughly but I love my setup now.

January 10, 2012 2:08:42 PM

I would recommend redirecting your folders as Realbeast mentioned. I do not do the program files folder as i have a 240gb ssd now, i do redirect the my documents/music/pictures directories as well as store program data on the HDDs thought the programs themselves are installed on the SSD and it works out wonderfully.
January 10, 2012 3:31:30 PM

I'm not enough of a advanced user to use one of the guids Realbeast posted and if i get what i want I might not need the others.

I have no problem in starting from scratch so i need no back ups or anything, if anyone has a guide for this (clean install) i would like it cause that sounds easiest. I want to move everything except a few programs and windows from the ssd to the hdd.
January 11, 2012 12:11:22 PM

I actually want to use junction points (if i have understaood corretly how they work) but I need to understand how to set them up properly.
a c 317 G Storage
January 11, 2012 12:32:02 PM

If you are uncomfortable making the changes needed, there is a freeware PROGRAM that will cause newly created users to have all of their files (downloads, libraries, etc) to be placed on a drive that you choose.

It will not move current users, so you will have to delete and recreate your users to move what you already have.
January 11, 2012 1:52:59 PM

I am comfortable making the changes needed, but I do not have the knowlage to use the guide (this one) that i see as the most fitting.
January 12, 2012 2:49:07 PM

Bumping cause is till need help :( .

What i need:
1)Explanations to the for mentioned guide. Junction points, etc.
2)If possible someone to possible guide me through it personally (over voice chat).
a c 317 G Storage
January 13, 2012 2:11:18 PM

Sorry, this is an advanced topic that requires far too much time to explain in detail. I do not recommend that you use junction points on your system unless you first create a disk image and save it somewhere, as these techniques can cause irreparable system damage that would require a clean re-install and loss of all data.

If you really want to pursue this, you will need to do some extensive reading starting with detailed guides like THIS one.

I would strongly recommend that instead of making manual changes that you use PROFILE RELOCATOR and simply relocate all files of a particular user as they are added if you wish to do this.
January 13, 2012 3:52:24 PM

I found this guide which seems simply enough. Do you think this is as dangerous?

I'm totally ok with doing a clean re-install cause I'm going to do that anyway.
a c 317 G Storage
January 13, 2012 4:08:49 PM

If you make any mistakes it will probably screw up your OS installation, so as long as you back up your data and have the time, it is not "dangerous."
January 13, 2012 7:10:35 PM

Ones again, i have no data to back up :p  this is a brand new computer, got it a week ago. But good! I will try it in a week or so, have some school stuff i need to do.
January 13, 2012 8:04:01 PM

Oh one more question! I've heard that moving programdata might make windows updates fail, is there a way to solve this?
a b G Storage
January 13, 2012 10:29:53 PM

Use the built-in functionality to move the location of system directories where possible. There's no need to overcomplicate things with junction points and symlinks if it can be done cleanly that way. Use the latter only where necessary, and note that it can be difficult with some particularly important directories as Windows may not allow you to move/delete/rename them. You could boot up a Linux Live CD and do it there, but you'll need to consider if the benefits outweigh the required effort.

As for junction points vs "real" symlinks: use the latter if possible, but note that they won't work on XP or older because the NTFS version doesn't support them. Junction points are dangerous because certain delete operations on the junction point can delete the target. Symlinks are also network-transparent, ie. you can symlink to a remote file or directory and it will act as a local filesystem entity (just slower and subject to pointing to an unavailable location).
January 15, 2012 3:00:01 PM

What is this "built-in functionality" you are speaking of?

I use Win7 so i've got the NTFS version needed.
a c 317 G Storage
January 15, 2012 4:26:02 PM

randomizer said:
Use the built-in functionality to move the location of system directories where possible. There's no need to overcomplicate things with junction points and symlinks if it can be done cleanly that way. Use the latter only where necessary, and note that it can be difficult with some particularly important directories as Windows may not allow you to move/delete/rename them. You could boot up a Linux Live CD and do it there, but you'll need to consider if the benefits outweigh the required effort.

As for junction points vs "real" symlinks: use the latter if possible, but note that they won't work on XP or older because the NTFS version doesn't support them. Junction points are dangerous because certain delete operations on the junction point can delete the target. Symlinks are also network-transparent, ie. you can symlink to a remote file or directory and it will act as a local filesystem entity (just slower and subject to pointing to an unavailable location).


^ +1

This is very good advice, and I would again suggest that you just do it simply by installing programs manually to your HDD.
January 15, 2012 6:41:19 PM

My ssd now has 20gb space left when it should have about 40. Stuff i never use, nor needs a ssd are installed on it right now. And I'm also a bit afraid of the re-write limit. I'm going to do this by changing the paths, cause I'm a lazy bastard! I hope you help me with it cause that would be awesome.

Best Regards Doccool
a c 317 G Storage
January 15, 2012 9:48:24 PM

Use CCleaner to get rid of all the temp files and junk. And don't worry about the write limit -- you'll never hit it.
a b G Storage
January 16, 2012 7:21:03 AM

Doccool said:
What is this "built-in functionality" you are speaking of?

I use Win7 so i've got the NTFS version needed.

Basically what Realbeast was saying earlier (minus the junction points): http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/278592-32-windows-loc...

The "special" documents folders for pictures, music, etc are very easily moved, and TEMP isn't too hard either.

Doccool said:
My ssd now has 20gb space left when it should have about 40. Stuff i never use, nor needs a ssd are installed on it right now. And I'm also a bit afraid of the re-write limit. I'm going to do this by changing the paths, cause I'm a lazy bastard! I hope you help me with it cause that would be awesome.

Best Regards Doccool

Shrink your page file and turn off hibernation if you're not using it. The page file can get fairly big by default. The hibernation file will consume as much space on your C: drive as the amount of RAM you have, so if you don't hibernate, you're wasting a lot of space. I have a 30GB SSD that has been running my OS and programs since September 2009, and to keep it under that limit (actually under ~27.5GB as I partitioned it below its capacity) I was forced to disable hibernation and move a few folders and my page file off it. Your drive is larger so you can probably leave your page file on it, just keep its maximum size in check. Don't concern yourself with the write limit. Unless you abuse it the drive will most likely last beyond its usefulness in an enthusiast PC. You never concerned yourself about a HDD dying randomly did you? That's a much more catastrophic situation as well ;) 
January 16, 2012 1:25:08 PM

Hibernation is turned off already!

Hmm, ok thanks! Wasn't sure weather the write limit was really a big concern or not, so I took the safe way. But somehow even though you tell me to do it this way and not the hard way with symlinks and stuff I still feel really tempted to do it.

I do not really understand why you think that the symlink system is bad, could u explain it ones more?
a c 317 G Storage
January 16, 2012 6:59:15 PM

Another big space saver for your ssd is to disable Windows system restore points, just do a drive image periodically and back up data as it accumulates. If you don't want to do that full time, do it for a brief time and see how much space it will give you back.



a b G Storage
January 17, 2012 8:31:03 AM

Doccool said:
Hibernation is turned off already!

Just to make sure, run this from the command line and then restart to see if any space is freed:

powercfg -h off


Doccool said:
I do not really understand why you think that the symlink system is bad, could u explain it ones more?


It's not bad, but it's easier to break by accident because symlinks can be deleted. Also, a symlink does not enforce a valid target, so you can end up with a very messy filesystem full of symlinks that point to nowhere. Even if this doesn't happen (with system files/folders it probably won't, as you'll know if you delete them ;) ) you can still end up with a web of symlinks all over the place.

Also, if a symlink is made that points to itself or two another symlink that points back, you get an infinite loop that is going to kill your IO performance if accessed. Each time the OS follows a symlink it incurs a small performance penalty, so infinite loops are obviously dangerous.

I personally like the symlink system but that's because I use it often in Linux (where symlinks are common). However, I try to limit its use so that I am only relocating what is worth relocating, and doing so with directories rather than files. If you want to use it, by all means go ahead. Just make sure you plan your moves before you do them, especially where system files and folders are involved.
January 17, 2012 2:35:09 PM

Well i wasn't really going to symlink anything else then programfiles,programdata and userfiles! So that web off symlinks shouldn't get to be a problem. Well i'll proboly do it on saturday or sunday and we'll see the result.

Thank you for all you kind help and I'll get back to you with a report on how it went!
January 17, 2012 4:52:09 PM

Oh and these driver images, do you have a good guide on them?
January 21, 2012 8:46:57 PM

Guys! i really need your help! I was able to move the user and program data files, but I powered up my system and forgot the programfiles! Is there a way to copy a file that is in use (cause that is the error i get when copying my program files)
a c 317 G Storage
January 21, 2012 9:00:27 PM

No, you have to shut down the programs and processes directly or in the task manager to move those, otherwise the system would melt down.
January 22, 2012 9:25:57 AM

7 hours, 6 reinstallations...finalyl done! I had to combine 2 guides with each other but now it works smoothly! So awesome ^^

Thank you Realbeast, thank you Randomzier your angles!
!