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Can you build your own laptop?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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July 28, 2004 9:28:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hello,

I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the sound
card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have full
control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop like
Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.

I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully assembled?

Thanks.

More about : build laptop

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 28, 2004 10:13:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>Hello,
>
>I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
>case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the sound
>card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have full
>control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop like
>Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
>I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
>laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
>together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully assembled?
>
>Thanks.

In a way, yes. You get everything ready for the; HDD, CPU, OS, and
RAM. Many can be found at pricewatch.com under "barebones notebooks".
In almost every case these will be large 2 or 3 spindle desktop
replacements.
Thin and sexy? No, not very likely.
July 28, 2004 11:34:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

AndrewJ wrote:
> In a way, yes. You get everything ready for the; HDD, CPU, OS, and
> RAM. Many can be found at pricewatch.com under "barebones notebooks".
> In almost every case these will be large 2 or 3 spindle desktop
> replacements.
> Thin and sexy? No, not very likely.

I can't find any such thing in Pricewatch. Not under Barebones and not
under Notebooks. Can you be more specific?
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 28, 2004 11:52:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>AndrewJ wrote:
>> In a way, yes. You get everything ready for the; HDD, CPU, OS, and
>> RAM. Many can be found at pricewatch.com under "barebones notebooks".
>> In almost every case these will be large 2 or 3 spindle desktop
>> replacements.
>> Thin and sexy? No, not very likely.
>
>I can't find any such thing in Pricewatch. Not under Barebones and not
>under Notebooks. Can you be more specific?

Sorry, they list at pricewatch under "no OS". When you get to each
site most have them in a section called barebones. Warning- be very
careful what you get and don't get. On some you don't get a charger or
even a battery. After adding up all the extras, I thought all were
very expensive besides being very bulky.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 12:54:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

<PCU> wrote in message news:nv5gg01ckqvobt382euhh7nlb7ja7rhild@4ax.com...
| Hello,
|
| I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
| case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the
sound
| card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have
full
| control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop
like
| Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
|
| I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
| laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
| together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully
assembled?
|
| Thanks.

Somewhat yes. You can buy barebones notebooks and buy all your components
(CPU, memory, HD, wireleess, etc) to go in it. Once you buy allyour
components, you are better off (a lot cheaper +warranty) buying one exactly
how you want it from a manufacturer.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 2:04:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 17:28:47 -0400, PCU wrote:

>Hello,
>
>I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
>case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the sound
>card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have full
>control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop like
>Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
>I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
>laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
>together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully assembled?

The problem you'd quickly run into is laptops aren't "componentized"
like standard PCs are. Many things on laptops are integrated into the
motherboard, which is why those boards are so expensive if they need
to be replaced. It can easily cost you half as much as the PC costs to
have one repaired or replaced.

Bottom line is if want to be able to tinker, stick with desktops. If
you want mobility, if your space is at a premium, then go with a
laptop. If you go with a laptop, buy the extended warranty. It's
pretty much the only item I'd ever advise that for, but believe me, it
can easily be worth it.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 2:17:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You can only buy fully assembled.

--
DaveW



<PCU> wrote in message news:nv5gg01ckqvobt382euhh7nlb7ja7rhild@4ax.com...
> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
> case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the
sound
> card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have
full
> control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop
like
> Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
> laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
> together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully
assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 2:17:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote in message
news:%BVNc.204879$Oq2.61484@attbi_s52...
| You can only buy fully assembled.
|

Not true
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 2:58:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 17:28:47 -0400, <PCU> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
> case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the
> sound
> card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have
> full
> control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop
> like
> Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
> laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put
> it
> together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully
> assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>


I'm not saying it CAN'T be done, but it will be a damn sight more
difficult, assuming its possible.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 4:40:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

PCU wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
> case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the sound
> card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have full
> control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop like
> Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
> laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
> together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>
The trouble with laptops is that all the major "bits" are proprietary in
nature, meaning that most parts will only go with a particular laptop model.

About the only things that ARE interchangeable between different laptops
are the hard drive, PCMCIA cards (obviously), and in some cases, RAM
modules and optical drives.

As you already know, this is not at all the case with desktops, where
pretty much everything is interchangeable (within certain hardware limits).
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 6:57:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

PCU wrote in news:nv5gg01ckqvobt382euhh7nlb7ja7rhild@4ax.com:

> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately
> (the case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video
> card, the sound card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love
> being able to have full control over the brand of the components,
> instead of buying from a shop like Dell and either not having much
> choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying
> a laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and
> put it together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop
> fully assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>

The quick answer is no.

The slow, tedious answer is maybe, if you're willing to fabricate
the case and live with a laptop that is slow, physically large,
and clunky.

So, you want to try it anyway, Here's the overview. First, go to
www.mini-itx.com. They offer motherboards of the mini-itx size,
and possibly smaller. Mini-itx motherboards are about seven inches
square and come with most of the ports you will need, including
(on some models) pcmcia card slots. They also (I think) have
mini-power supplies.

With this in mind, design a case. My suggestion is to first look
at aluminum briefcases. The case will need to hold the motherboard,
hard disk, floppy and/or optical drive, power supply, plus the
screen. You will have to cut lots of holes in it. Don't ignore
cooling.

Find a screen that will fit in your case. Figure out how to mount
it.

Finally, consider a battery. I don't know where to go for this,
but some power suplies will take 12V DC.

Voila, a laptop that, if you are really good at this, is only
about twice the volume and weight of a regular one, but at
least it's yours, and it's upgradable.

By the way, if your case design is good, market it.

Just an idea.

..wk.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 9:12:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Phil wrote:
>> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately
>> (the case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video
>> card, the sound card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love
>> being able to have full control over the brand of the components,
>> instead of buying from a shop like Dell and either not having much
>> choice or having no choice at all.
>>
>> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering
>> buying a laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components
>> separately and put it together yourself? Or is it only possible to
>> buy a laptop fully assembled?

Notebooks are not as modular as full systems, but there are exceptions. Asus
makes what they call a "barebone notebook" that you can configure yourself.

http://store.topmic.com/computers--notebooks.html
--

Mike Russell
www.geigy.2y.net
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 5:20:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 17:28:47 -0400, PCU wrote:

>I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
>laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
>together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully assembled?

It would be as possible, and as intelligent, as building your own
SUV.
Emanuel
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 5:47:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

<PCU> wrote in message news:nv5gg01ckqvobt382euhh7nlb7ja7rhild@4ax.com...
> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
> case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the
sound
> card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have
full
> control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop
like
> Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
> laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
> together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully
assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>

There have been some informative posts and some ignorant posts here. But it
truely depends on what you are starting with.

Some laptops you can buy a whitebox system and buy your own componets and
put them to together. As someone else sugest the asus m6ne you can do this.
I am looking into getting a compal CL56 and doing this also. But everything
is smaller and more breakable so YMMV.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 5:47:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Root wrote:

> There have been some informative posts and some ignorant posts here. But it
> truely depends on what you are starting with.
>
> Some laptops you can buy a whitebox system and buy your own componets and
> put them to together. As someone else sugest the asus m6ne you can do this.
> I am looking into getting a compal CL56 and doing this also. But everything
> is smaller and more breakable so YMMV.

I don't suppose it's actually going to save any money, is it?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 5:47:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

ToolPackinMama wrote:

> Root wrote:
>
>
>>There have been some informative posts and some ignorant posts here. But it
>>truely depends on what you are starting with.
>>
>>Some laptops you can buy a whitebox system and buy your own componets and
>>put them to together. As someone else sugest the asus m6ne you can do this.
>>I am looking into getting a compal CL56 and doing this also. But everything
>>is smaller and more breakable so YMMV.
>
>
> I don't suppose it's actually going to save any money, is it?

Kind of depends on what you compare it against.

The thing about laptops/notebooks, and why the 'whole thing' isn't
standardized with 'interchangeable' parts, is that the basic goal is to
cram as much stuff as possible into the smallest form factor, and that
means being 'creative' with the packaging. Even so, some things are
interchangeable: hard drive, CDs, memory. But having 'plug in' cards with
spare slots just eats up space so the 'motherboard' is going to be a custom
fit, all in one, proposition. And, since that's where the main
'flexibility' to a desktop resides, you just lost 90% of the 'custom
configuration' advantage right there: 80% due to the fixed board
configuration (which is going to include the LCD drivers) and 10% because
there aren't any 'spare holes' to mount things in.

Next worst problem is a socketed processor with a conventional heatsink:
BIG. So you (typically) have soldered in processors, often in a smaller
form factor package, with more exotic heatpipe cooling mechanisms so they
fit in the smallest space possible. You CAN, actually, find 'bare bones'
laptops that allow you to 'plug-in' the processor of choice but you can see
you've traded off at least some of the space advantage of the true mobiles
for the luxury of doing it.

And then building in 'spare' watts in the PSU for 'add-ons', or a gaggle of
different mobo guts versions, or 'which ever processor' you pick, doesn't
optimize size either.

The point is, besides explaining why it's done the way it's done, is to
again ask, compared to what? A larger, 'bare bones', self configured laptop
to a smaller, lighter, more compact one? If you don't care about size then
you might consider it 'cheaper' but if size is the purpose then it isn't,
really.

Frankly, I doubt it would be cheaper simply from being 'self built' anyway
because there just aren't enough places where you have a choice with which
to save money. If it were cheaper I'd say it's more due to the same kinds
of reasons why brand Y is cheaper than brand A to begin with, or because
you don't really end up with the same thing, but not because 'you built it'.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 5:47:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

ToolPackinMama <laura@lauragoodwin.org> wrote in message news:<41090168.2289E16C@lauragoodwin.org>...
> Root wrote:
>
> > There have been some informative posts and some ignorant posts here. But it
> > truely depends on what you are starting with.
> >
> > Some laptops you can buy a whitebox system and buy your own componets and
> > put them to together. As someone else sugest the asus m6ne you can do this.
> > I am looking into getting a compal CL56 and doing this also. But everything
> > is smaller and more breakable so YMMV.
>
> I don't suppose it's actually going to save any money, is it?

Nope, at least not much. The company that is buying 200,000 hard
drives a year, every year, from a manufacturer is getting a slightly
better deal than the guy who calls up and says, "Hey, I need _one_
hard drive for a laptop I'm building"

In the desktop arena, there are lots of manufacturers and lots of DIY
upgraders, so you can build a desktop cheaper _and_ better yourself.
Everything is pretty standard, and you can fit lots of stuff in a
typical case - even fully loaded; they are mostly filled with air.

On a laptop, there are few standard items - memory and HD are usually
exchangeable and standardized like their desktop counterparts, and I
think that's about it (though LCD panels are exchangeable to a small
extent, and possibly mini-PCI cards).
July 29, 2004 6:56:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 02:57:19 GMT, William Korvine <korvine@hotmail.com> wrote:
>The slow, tedious answer is maybe, if you're willing to fabricate
>the case and live with a laptop that is slow, physically large,
>and clunky.
>
>So, you want to try it anyway, Here's the overview. First, go to
>www.mini-itx.com. They offer motherboards of the mini-itx size,
>and possibly smaller. Mini-itx motherboards are about seven inches
>square and come with most of the ports you will need, including
>(on some models) pcmcia card slots. They also (I think) have
>mini-power supplies.
>
>With this in mind, design a case. My suggestion is to first look
>at aluminum briefcases. The case will need to hold the motherboard,
>hard disk, floppy and/or optical drive, power supply, plus the
>screen. You will have to cut lots of holes in it. Don't ignore
>cooling.
>
>Find a screen that will fit in your case. Figure out how to mount
>it.
>
>Finally, consider a battery. I don't know where to go for this,
>but some power suplies will take 12V DC.
>
>Voila, a laptop that, if you are really good at this, is only
>about twice the volume and weight of a regular one, but at
>least it's yours, and it's upgradable.

I'd like to see someone try to get this past airport security!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 7:33:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> | You can only buy fully assembled.
> |
>
> Not true
>
>

Essentially true, if you are talking about laptops. You can buy shells to
add a processor, hard drive and memory to. But you will end up with a
laptop with some assembly required, it won't really be a homebuilt. -Dave
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 7:35:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

PCU writes:

>I've always built my own PCs

When faced with a similar desire when I was unemployed & needing a
portable system, I looked at several options including used laptops.
Unfortunately all used laptops I found either couldn't be upgraded to
my ram requirements or were priced very near to new laptop cost.

I ended up buying a Shuttle XPC, a used processor, used 512Mb ram, &
used 80Gb harddrive. I added a mouse, zip, & cdrom, which I already
owned & purchased a HappyHacker keyboard. For a outlay of about $500,
I had a quite powerful system the size of a toaster I could lug
around.

It worked for me since the only places I used it had monitors
available for me to use. It's not an ideal general solution, but it
was 1/3 the cost of a comparable laptop.

--
<> Robert Geer & Donna Tomky | |||| We sure |||| <>
<> bgeer@xmission.com | == == find it == == <>
<> dtomky@xmission.com | == == enchanting == == <>
<> Albuquerque, NM USA | |||| here! |||| <>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 7:37:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> I ended up buying a Shuttle XPC, a used processor, used 512Mb ram, &
> used 80Gb harddrive. I added a mouse, zip, & cdrom, which I already
> owned & purchased a HappyHacker keyboard. For a outlay of about $500,
> I had a quite powerful system the size of a toaster I could lug
> around.
>
> It worked for me since the only places I used it had monitors
> available for me to use. It's not an ideal general solution, but it
> was 1/3 the cost of a comparable laptop.
>

Add a NEC LCD1565 **** PORTABLE **** LCD monitor, and you've got a portable
system that's still half the cost of a comparable laptop. Oh, and you don't
need to borrow anybody's monitor. -Dave
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 7:41:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

<PCU> wrote in message news:nv5gg01ckqvobt382euhh7nlb7ja7rhild@4ax.com...
> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
> case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the
sound
> card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have
full
> control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop
like
> Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
> laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
> together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully
assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>

There's another option you should consider. Build an SFF (small form
factor) system and add a NEC LCD1565 (PORTABLE!!!) LCD 15" monitor to it.
That's what I did recently. It's not quite as portable as a laptop, but
show me a laptop with a 3DMark 2001 score of 13,666 for less than a thousand
bucks. (evil grin) And my solution can be carried onto any airplane, it
two bags. If you go with the Antec Aria case like I did, you even have your
choice of ANY micro-ATX mainboard. So it is truly a HOMEBUILT portable
system. -Dave
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 10:11:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"ToolPackinMama" <laura@lauragoodwin.org> wrote in message
news:41090168.2289E16C@lauragoodwin.org...
| Root wrote:
|
| > There have been some informative posts and some ignorant posts here. But
it
| > truely depends on what you are starting with.
| >
| > Some laptops you can buy a whitebox system and buy your own componets
and
| > put them to together. As someone else sugest the asus m6ne you can do
this.
| > I am looking into getting a compal CL56 and doing this also. But
everything
| > is smaller and more breakable so YMMV.
|
| I don't suppose it's actually going to save any money, is it?

Not a dime.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 29, 2004 11:39:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The closest that you can come -- and this isn't easy to find or common
-- is a "barebones" laptop, with no cpu, memory or hard drive.

PCU wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
> case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the sound
> card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have full
> control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop like
> Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
> laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
> together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 30, 2004 2:05:12 AM
July 30, 2004 5:09:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Not really practical for laptops. Like trying to build a modern automobile
by purchasing the individual parts, the overall cost would soar through the
roof. Even building desktops from scratch is becoming more difficult from a
cost-savings point of view, but I still do it because I like to select the
components myself.

<PCU> wrote in message news:nv5gg01ckqvobt382euhh7nlb7ja7rhild@4ax.com...
> Hello,
>
> I've always built my own PCs by buying all the components separately (the
> case, the motherboard/CPU, the hard drive, the RAM, the video card, the
sound
> card, the network card, the CD drives, etc). I love being able to have
full
> control over the brand of the components, instead of buying from a shop
like
> Dell and either not having much choice or having no choice at all.
>
> I have absolutely no experience with laptops. I am considering buying a
> laptop now. Is it possible to buy laptop components separately and put it
> together yourself? Or is it only possible to buy a laptop fully
assembled?
>
> Thanks.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
August 15, 2004 3:03:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Dave,

I like your solution. I am also trying to put together a portable
desktop system using standard, upgradeable components. (Bought a Dell
Latitude but am regretting for its short useful life and the
dead-ended upgrading path.)

Just want to clarify:

Antec Aria is cube sized. If I put such a box in a wheeled suitcase,
it is quite bulky, and I might be stopped due to exceeding luggage
size limits... right? I looked at Antec website and Aria's shortest
dimension is 7.9". And the luggage limit is 9 x 14 x 22. If I put
that into a suitcase and count the padding and tube space for pull-out
handle etc, it might go over the 9" limit. I am just guessing here.

I know it is not that strict after all. But I did see from time to
time people were stopped and asked to put their suitcase into that
small measuring cage.

What is your experience? Or you just carry it by hand...

Thanks!


Simon


"Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote in message news:<2mt271Fqq2n3U1@uni-berlin.de>...

> There's another option you should consider. Build an SFF (small form
> factor) system and add a NEC LCD1565 (PORTABLE!!!) LCD 15" monitor to it.
> That's what I did recently. It's not quite as portable as a laptop, but
> show me a laptop with a 3DMark 2001 score of 13,666 for less than a thousand
> bucks. (evil grin) And my solution can be carried onto any airplane, it
> two bags. If you go with the Antec Aria case like I did, you even have your
> choice of ANY micro-ATX mainboard. So it is truly a HOMEBUILT portable
> system. -Dave
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
August 15, 2004 6:52:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Simon Leung wrote:

> Dave,
>
> I like your solution. I am also trying to put together a portable
> desktop system using standard, upgradeable components. (Bought a Dell
> Latitude but am regretting for its short useful life and the
> dead-ended upgrading path.)
>
> Just want to clarify:
>
> Antec Aria is cube sized. If I put such a box in a wheeled suitcase,
> it is quite bulky, and I might be stopped due to exceeding luggage
> size limits... right? I looked at Antec website and Aria's shortest
> dimension is 7.9". And the luggage limit is 9 x 14 x 22. If I put
> that into a suitcase and count the padding and tube space for pull-out
> handle etc, it might go over the 9" limit. I am just guessing here.
>
> I know it is not that strict after all. But I did see from time to
> time people were stopped and asked to put their suitcase into that
> small measuring cage.
>
> What is your experience? Or you just carry it by hand...
>
> Thanks!

Bad plan to hope they'll ignore it's dimensions.

And I wouldn't put a PC built with conventional parts through luggage handling.

Carry on.

>
>
> Simon
>
>
> "Dave C." <mdupre@sff.net> wrote in message news:<2mt271Fqq2n3U1@uni-berlin.de>...
>
>
>>There's another option you should consider. Build an SFF (small form
>>factor) system and add a NEC LCD1565 (PORTABLE!!!) LCD 15" monitor to it.
>>That's what I did recently. It's not quite as portable as a laptop, but
>>show me a laptop with a 3DMark 2001 score of 13,666 for less than a thousand
>>bucks. (evil grin) And my solution can be carried onto any airplane, it
>>two bags. If you go with the Antec Aria case like I did, you even have your
>>choice of ANY micro-ATX mainboard. So it is truly a HOMEBUILT portable
>>system. -Dave
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
August 15, 2004 7:13:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Simon Leung wrote:
>
> Dave,
>
> I like your solution. I am also trying to put together a portable
> desktop system using standard, upgradeable components. (Bought a Dell
> Latitude but am regretting for its short useful life and the
> dead-ended upgrading path.)

"Short useful life?" "Dead-ended upgrading path?"

Care to elaborate?

Notan
!