Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Litlle help required for oveclocking phenom ii 560 be

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
August 31, 2012 3:33:23 PM

i have core unlocked phenom ii 560 be,which is running quite stable even at full load.but i am wondering that if i do overclock it do i have to raise the the cpu voltage which is set to auto in bios
August 31, 2012 3:56:29 PM

omgzombie said:
i have core unlocked phenom ii 560 be,which is running quite stable even at full load.but i am wondering that if i do overclock it do i have to raise the the cpu voltage which is set to auto in bios

Yes it is always better to set the voltage manually when overclocking.
m
0
l
August 31, 2012 4:53:11 PM

sheepsnowadays said:
Yes it is always better to set the voltage manually when overclocking.


but what exact voltage should i set it to?
m
0
l
Related resources
August 31, 2012 5:25:26 PM

omgzombie said:
but what exact voltage should i set it to?

You have a lot of reading on overclocking to do but i will try to help. You didn't even mention what clock speed your aiming for as a higher clock speed needs more voltage. Also every chip is binned differently so your chip will overclock different than someone else with the same chip. Here as about as simple as I can make it with reference to my 1090t settings.

3.6GHz = 1.36V
3.7GHz = 1.37V
3.8GHz = 1.38V
3.8Ghz+ = 1.4V+

Do not go over 1.5V

If you have LLC (load line calibration) leave it on auto.

Also you should OC your CPU/NB to at least 2.6GHz as this will improve performance quite a bit. You should be able to reach 2.6GHz at 1.25V but don't go over 1.4V on the CPU/NB

Monitor your temps when your doing this, don't go over 62C, you will probably need an after market cooler if you wish to go over 3.6Ghz
Test for stability when you reach a clock speed that your satisfied at.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 31, 2012 6:26:57 PM

The first thing you want to do is try to unlock the disabled cores.This is done by activating Advanced Clock Calibration (ACC).Leave it on auto.

If you unlocked them and your CPU is stable proceed to overcloking.The easiest way to do this is by increasing the CPU Multiplier.
m
0
l
August 31, 2012 11:23:27 PM

This is very complicated, and it will take a lot of reading if you want a good overclock.

You first need a CPU monitoring program to check your voltage and clock speeds. I use CPU Z, you can find it through a quick google search. Also, download HWMonitor from them. That program shows your temperatures and a better reading of your voltage. Then, you will need a program to stress your CPU to test for stability at higher OC's. I use Prime95.

In the BIOS, you may need to do some things to make sure your CPU is giving the right reading. I had to turn off C1E, K8 Cool N Quiet, and set LLC to Regular, in order to have full control over my voltage and clock speed.

As Kamen wrote, you will want to use the multiplier to OC at first. The other setting you can use is called the FSB, or Front Side Bus. When you multiply the FSB number, which in your case is probably 200 or so, by the multiplier, you get your total clock speed.

For example, on my BE my clock speed was 3.4Ghz. I boot my PC, and press delete when the screen comes up that asks me if I want to go to BIOS. In my BIOS, under M.I.T. Intelligent Tweaker, my CPU was set to 200 on the FSB and 17 in the multiplier, for a total of 3,400, or 3.4 Gigahertz. I can raise the multiplier to 19, and then I will have a total of 3,800, or 3.8 Ghz. This is now overclocked.

When I go into my Operating System, I will load HWMonitor, CPU-z, and Prime95. I want to close all other programs. I want to make sure my CPU is running at a decent temp. Mine idles at 33C. I have 1.375V on the CPU, which is normal. You can change this in the BIOS if you want to.

I then let Prime95 run a "Blend" torture test on my CPU. It runs for 2 hours with 0 errors. Throughout the test, I check my temps to make sure that they don't go above about 55C (this is subjective, you could be comfortable with higher temps, but mine is rated up to 61C), which they don't. Also, I check my Voltage to make sure it stays the same, 1.375V or so.

This OC is now "stable", by my standards.

If you fail Prime95 or get blue screens, you can go into the BIOS again and up the voltage to 1.4V, and try again. This WILL increase heat, so watch your temps! The higher to V, the better stability you will get on OC's, but you have to deal with heat.

There exists much more complicated concepts. For instance, if you change your FSB instead of your reference clock multiplier, you will change the speed of all of your other components (RAM, Northbridge, HTT, HTLink). You would need to change your reference clock multipliers in the BIOS for each of these to get them back to normal. This requires balancing the FSB and multiplier of many components at once, which is tricky. Probably, stick with just the multiplier.

These are the very basics, and they have gotten many BE users very far.

Good luck!
m
0
l
September 1, 2012 6:40:23 AM

sheepsnowadays said:
You have a lot of reading on overclocking to do but i will try to help. You didn't even mention what clock speed your aiming for as a higher clock speed needs more voltage. Also every chip is binned differently so your chip will overclock different than someone else with the same chip. Here as about as simple as I can make it with reference to my 1090t settings.

3.6GHz = 1.36V
3.7GHz = 1.37V
3.8GHz = 1.38V
3.8Ghz+ = 1.4V+

Do not go over 1.5V

If you have LLC (load line calibration) leave it on auto.

Also you should OC your CPU/NB to at least 2.6GHz as this will improve performance quite a bit. You should be able to reach 2.6GHz at 1.25V but don't go over 1.4V on the CPU/NB

Monitor your temps when your doing this, don't go over 62C, you will probably need an after market cooler if you wish to go over 3.6Ghz
Test for stability when you reach a clock speed that your satisfied at.


how to know that if i have LLC?
m
0
l
September 1, 2012 6:43:50 AM

Kamen_BG said:
The first thing you want to do is try to unlock the disabled cores.This is done by activating Advanced Clock Calibration (ACC).Leave it on auto.

If you unlocked them and your CPU is stable proceed to overcloking.The easiest way to do this is by increasing the CPU Multiplier.


yea i have unlocked the cores.
m
0
l
September 1, 2012 6:56:19 AM

Borochadwicsays said:
This is very complicated, and it will take a lot of reading if you want a good overclock.

You first need a CPU monitoring program to check your voltage and clock speeds. I use CPU Z, you can find it through a quick google search. Also, download HWMonitor from them. That program shows your temperatures and a better reading of your voltage. Then, you will need a program to stress your CPU to test for stability at higher OC's. I use Prime95.

In the BIOS, you may need to do some things to make sure your CPU is giving the right reading. I had to turn off C1E, K8 Cool N Quiet, and set LLC to Regular, in order to have full control over my voltage and clock speed.

As Kamen wrote, you will want to use the multiplier to OC at first. The other setting you can use is called the FSB, or Front Side Bus. When you multiply the FSB number, which in your case is probably 200 or so, by the multiplier, you get your total clock speed.

For example, on my BE my clock speed was 3.4Ghz. I boot my PC, and press delete when the screen comes up that asks me if I want to go to BIOS. In my BIOS, under M.I.T. Intelligent Tweaker, my CPU was set to 200 on the FSB and 17 in the multiplier, for a total of 3,400, or 3.4 Gigahertz. I can raise the multiplier to 19, and then I will have a total of 3,800, or 3.8 Ghz. This is now overclocked.

When I go into my Operating System, I will load HWMonitor, CPU-z, and Prime95. I want to close all other programs. I want to make sure my CPU is running at a decent temp. Mine idles at 33C. I have 1.375V on the CPU, which is normal. You can change this in the BIOS if you want to.

i did prime95 test for 7 minutes.the temp rose to 77c,but there was no stability issue

alright i did a prime95 blend test and my temp reached upto 77c.but yea did not get any blue screens
I then let Prime95 run a "Blend" torture test on my CPU. It runs for 2 hours with 0 errors. Throughout the test, I check my temps to make sure that they don't go above about 55C (this is subjective, you could be comfortable with higher temps, but mine is rated up to 61C), which they don't. Also, I check my Voltage to make sure it stays the same, 1.375V or so.

This OC is now "stable", by my standards.

If you fail Prime95 or get blue screens, you can go into the BIOS again and up the voltage to 1.4V, and try again. This WILL increase heat, so watch your temps! The higher to V, the better stability you will get on OC's, but you have to deal with heat.

There exists much more complicated concepts. For instance, if you change your FSB instead of your reference clock multiplier, you will change the speed of all of your other components (RAM, Northbridge, HTT, HTLink). You would need to change your reference clock multipliers in the BIOS for each of these to get them back to normal. This requires balancing the FSB and multiplier of many components at once, which is tricky. Probably, stick with just the multiplier.

These are the very basics, and they have gotten many BE users very far.

Good luck!
m
0
l
September 1, 2012 7:10:11 AM

i used prime 95 blend test for 7 minutes. it reached 77c.the safe temp for my 560 be is 70c,so i guess i need an aftermarket cooler but there was no stability issue.
m
0
l
!