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How easy is it to change out a PSU Fan?

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  • Power Supplies
  • OCZ
  • Fan
  • Components
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Last response: in Components
March 25, 2010 12:59:18 AM

What skill level does it require to replace a FAN in a PSU unit?

I have an OCZ 700Watt PSU and I am wondering how hard it is to change out a fan? Is this easy to do? or is it something to recommend against?

I looked at the screws on it and wonder how feasible it would be to open it up.

More about : easy change psu fan

a c 246 ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 1:09:55 AM

It is fairly easy to do. However, opening the psu case will void the warranty.
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March 25, 2010 2:01:39 AM

First off the warranty has expired so I don't care about voiding it.

Is it kinda a hard thing to mess up?

There is a sticker on the PSU that says 'internal parts are not serviceable.' However I think that is just to scare people off. If I could slide it out I don't think it would be too hard to replace the fan.

However I am afraid if I mess up then I will have cost myself $100 or so dollars in having to buy a new one.
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March 25, 2010 7:45:30 AM

So how do you do it? :o 
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a b ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 7:58:06 AM

Some PSU actully solder the fans wire right onto the PCB.
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a c 137 ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 8:20:08 AM

If there is no warranty, go ahead and open it up. If you have any mechanical skill it should be obvious what to do. Some are soldered, others use a 2 or 3 prong clip. You might need to leave the original fan connection in place and splice your wires in. Should use standard sizes and parts, though finding a 135mm fan is probably more difficult then the standard 120mm.
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a b ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 8:52:53 AM

Sounds like a fun project! Why not just mount a second fan externally though?
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a c 137 ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 9:04:10 AM

Air flow won't be as good for one. Won't learn as much or see whats inside the PSU is another. The PSU doesn't work already, so as long as you don't apply to much force to anything you can't really make it worse.
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Best solution

March 25, 2010 9:05:08 AM

You may follow these steps (at your own risk):
1. disconnect the computer from the power outlet (<-very important obviously)
2. press the computer's power on/off button a few times to discharge the PSU's caps (<-very important)
3. disconnect the PSU from the other system components and remove it from the computer case
4. remove the appropriate screws from the PSU casing and open the cover

Here you should see how the fan is connected to the PSU board. Typically, it's a simple 2-pin or 3-pin(less common) power connector(soldered wires are pretty rare these days) and all you have to do is disconnect it (it'll have small tabs holding it in so a little force is required) and replace the fan. If your setup is different or if you need more detailed instructions, then post some pics of the PSU's interior so we can tell you how to proceed.

If you're trying to replace the original fan with a different model that may complicate things.

Edit: I found some interior pics of your PSU. I didn't notice you had it listed in your sig.

http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews/cases/OCZ_Ga...

It does indeed use a 2-pin power connector (can be seen in the first pic below the red coil at the bottom right edge of the main heatsink).
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March 25, 2010 9:21:24 AM

rwayne said:
What skill level does it require to replace a FAN in a PSU unit?

I have an OCZ 700Watt PSU and I am wondering how hard it is to change out a fan? Is this easy to do? or is it something to recommend against?

I looked at the screws on it and wonder how feasible it would be to open it up.




Just out of interest, as nobody else has asked.....why would you want to?
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a c 144 ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 9:27:25 AM

Bombhead said:
why would you want to?

Simple. If you have an otherwise working PSU, why discard it if you have a chance to repair it. It's not as if it's a junk POS,

4745454b said:
Should use standard sizes and parts, though finding a 135mm fan is probably more difficult then the standard 120mm.

Standard sizing indicates that the fan is most likely a 140 mm unit. Here, newegg is your friend:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...
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a b ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 7:17:27 PM

Logan the Huge pointed out what's important to not electrocute yourself. As long as you do that, and are careful not to damage the PSU, you should be fine. While you can just splice the wires for the fan, make sure you crimp the wires properly and leave no wire exposed. I'd also cover them in electrical tape and make sure they are put away neatly so as not to melt and expose the wire by being in contact with a heat sink or something. If you're good with a soldering iron, then of course just solder it.

When you're done, you may want to use a PSU tester to make sure it still works as expected rather than testing it out on your rig. Just a suggestion.
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a c 137 ) Power supply
March 25, 2010 11:37:36 PM

The nice thing about this is you don't have to remove the PCB. The risk of frying yourself is pretty low.
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March 27, 2010 4:11:58 AM

Best answer selected by Rwayne.
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