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Outdoor wifi

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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March 24, 2010 9:04:58 PM

I have just moved into a brick house and the wifi does not reach through the whole house, or outside. I currently have a linksys wrt54g router in the office (front of house). I would like to be able to work outside (back of house) but am not sure if a repeater, additional WAP, or a new router is the best idea. Can anyone help??

More about : outdoor wifi

Anonymous
March 25, 2010 11:48:36 AM

Is it possible to put the wireless router by a window at the back ? Signal thru glass is better than thru brick.

I know this doesn't solve the issues indoors, so you should experiment with different channels -- some will work better or worse depending on environmental factors.
March 25, 2010 12:03:35 PM

mlt1981 said:
I currently have a linksys wrt54g router


Your router is perfect to h4xx0r with DD-WRT firmware, then you can boost the signal strength and you'll be happily surfing in your backyard! This method is totally free and easy to do, simply g00gle your router and DD-WRT and you'll find a gazillion discussions.

Or, if your not technical and want to spend some money, buy some big high gain replacement antennas. Example: http://www.amazon.com/Linksys-High-Antenna-Connectors-H...


Good luck!


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March 25, 2010 1:17:17 PM

The router has to be in the front because that's where my office is, where I work most of the time. I am not very tech-savvy, so experimentation is probably not the best idea.
Anonymous
March 25, 2010 1:23:29 PM

Experimenting with channels is really no harder than logging in to the router user setup screens via your browser. If you need a refresher on that, see literature which came with router or -- download router manual from maker's website.

It's quite possible to add a second wireless router as an access point though certain adjustments have to be made -- I say router rather than dedicated access point because routers often turn up cheap secondhand (or in the garbage) as users swap ISP. Generally you have to link the routers via a cable -- though if yours and the new one both support WDS you may be able to link them by wireless.
March 25, 2010 1:46:05 PM

Thanks for the advice. Are there any problems/risks with using that type of 3rd party firmware?
Anonymous
March 25, 2010 5:04:34 PM

This shows you roughly what to do:

http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/965


The 3rd party firmware (by which I guess you mean customised ISP supplied ASDL routers) mostly affects how the router connects to the ISP -- this doesn't affect the wireless side.
March 25, 2010 5:35:33 PM

I was actually referring to the DD-WRT firmware that yzfr1guy suggested.
March 25, 2010 7:49:05 PM

Anything you do could potentially brick your router, but honestly it's very simple and worth trying if the device isn't giving you what you need to begin with. But, since you say your not too technical then I'd suggest getting some new high gain antennas as they'll do wonders and it's a simple screw off and on step. I've seen replacement antennas double to range of a wireless device.

Good luck and best wishes!
April 1, 2010 2:57:24 PM

I tried experimenting with different channels, but it didn't have much improvement. I'm going to try the high-gain antennas next.
!