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Build Log: Project Raven

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  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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September 5, 2012 3:06:26 PM

I've been building this for quite awhile and sharing it on Facebook. Not surprisingly, the comments I received were along the lines of whether it could play Modern Warfare or asking me the difference between my machine and their laptop.

I realized that I've shared it with the wrong crowd of people, and that I should have shared it over here instead. Therefore, most of the pictures are backdated.

I aim to provide answers to things that you guys might want to try, but not sure of the outcome. Hopefully, this will minimize some pain (and cash) of trying it out on your own. Feel free to ask questions. The hardware changes along the way, and I'll be updating the hardware specs as I go on.

I am a fan of Noctua fans (pun intended) so you will notice a lot of Noctua in my log.

Lastly, I do not have a lot of experience in this field, so please forgive me if some of my actions are illogical. I am just trying to learn.

More about : build log project raven

September 5, 2012 3:19:13 PM

Firstly, my case (Silverstone Raven RV03) is joined by rivets. I decided to remove them (by drilling) and replace with screws to facilitate easier modifications in the future.




It does makes things more convenient when I want to remove the back plate, but it won't take repeated screwing/unscrewing. I guess it'll start loosening up after 20++ times. Did not continue replacing the rivets on the rest of the case due to that reason.
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September 5, 2012 3:38:31 PM

Ok, enough of the boring rivets/screw conversion. I just wanted to gain some momentum before proceeding on with the more interesting stuff. Took apart one of my Sapphire Radeon 6970 Dual Fan, and replaced the fans with Noctua NF-F12's to see the difference in temperature/noise.













All I can say, is that it's definitely not worth the time and effort spent. It's only slightly quieter ( unless the Sapphire's original fans spin at 100% ) and the difference in temperature are just slight. (Didn't have accurate temperature measurement equipment at that time). But the most importantly, it's pretty hard to get it fixed, the width's too huge for most cases, and it eats 3 1/2 slots. (80mm fans will probably solve the width issue, but then there'll probably be no gain in temps/acoustics)
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Related resources
September 5, 2012 4:05:26 PM

Went for a 3-fan configuration with the Noctua NH-D14 and 3 Noctua NF-F12 fans. (More is always better heh.) Noise is a factor for me, thus I didn't go for 3 Deltas instead. I don't have the exact temperatures, but there is a pretty decent jump as compared to the original 2-fan configuration. Besides, it looks cooler heh.



And mounted in my case.



Looks great through the window.




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a c 190 K Overclocking
September 5, 2012 4:06:58 PM

If you hadn't tried, we wouldn't have learned man,
**In reference to the Gfx cards, you posted the Hsf as I posted :) **
now if you formed a shroud somehow to focus them, I reckon you'd see temp improvements at lower speeds,
Go, plan, mod :) 
Moto
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September 5, 2012 4:18:46 PM

So I've a bit annoyed with the whirring of the Silverstone Air Penetrator AP-181 at full speed one day, and my hands were getting quite itchy. Had some Noctua NF-F12 fans lying around so I... ...









This was pretty much a waste of money and time.
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September 5, 2012 4:22:17 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
If you hadn't tried, we wouldn't have learned man,
**In reference to the Gfx cards, you posted the Hsf as I posted :) **
now if you formed a shroud somehow to focus them, I reckon you'd see temp improvements at lower speeds,
Go, plan, mod :) 
Moto



Haha thanks for the encouragement. But actually this was done long time ago. I'm chilling my cards with my WC loops now =P And honestly, once I went water, there was no turning back. Just posting all these in hope that some random soul wanting to try the same thing will stumble upon this thread and learn from my mistakes. =D
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September 5, 2012 4:30:16 PM

My build as of this stage is:
Intel i7-2600k
Asus P8z68 Deluxe
G.Skillx 1600MHz 9-9-9-24-2T
2x Radeon 6970

Was doing some overclocking, and this was one of the results. Couldn't get it to stabilize even with the 3-fan Noctua. The voltage it required was crazy!




Ignore the speed test. Back then I thought it was somehow important as well.
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September 5, 2012 4:47:44 PM

Soon after that, the FX-8150 came out. I wanted to run 2 machines side by side, the i7-2600k and the FX-8150 and test it out. (Reviews at that point were sketchy)


I think the chip looks beautiful hehheh.



The i7-2600k and the FX-8150 side by side. I feel the FX-8150 wins hands down based on appearance.





*Insert speech about parallelism here*



Added the Noctua on top just for kicks

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September 5, 2012 5:12:30 PM

Pretty devastated with regards to the 8150's performance even after my overclock...



Left it aside for quite awhile after that, and forgot about my dreams about building 2 machines side by side.

Soon after, news of Andre Yang hitting the world record with the same Motherboard and processor reached me. It made me reach for the FX-8150 again, and attempt a more modest overclock... ...



Sadly, my FX-8150 never made it through the night.
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September 5, 2012 5:23:32 PM

I know I'll sound like a spoilt brat for saying this, but after experiencing overclocking on a ROG board, a normal Asus board just couldn't do the trick anymore.

Luckily, my sister's computer died after 5 years of torture. (hehheh). She soon became the proud owner of my i7-2600k, P8z68 Deluxe, and 16GB 1600MHz DDR3 G.Skillx.

Threw in a nice Asus 7770 for her also.
Looks like her Farmville won't lag anymore.


As for me, after selling my house (just kidding) I bought...



It's damn huge!!!






Crammed full of RAMs



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September 5, 2012 5:39:58 PM

On a side note, here's how I first started water cooling. I know it's weird to be emotional on a forum, but these photos really bring back memories. :) 



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September 5, 2012 5:53:21 PM

2 months later, had my first real watercooling loop set up.



If you look at the top radiator closely, you'll realize that I harvested it from my old Corsair H70.




The most important things I've learnt here are:
1: Never, ever, ever harvest the old Corsair radiators for your new loop. Sure, they perform well when using as a closed-loop cooler out of the box. But not on a custom loop. The barbs welded on are 6mm ID, and just slows your whole loop down. Short of cutting the barb and welding on a 3/8" or 1/2" fitting, there really isn't any way around that.

2: Plan the loop beforehand and be sure to buy 45°, 60° or 90° joints. Without them, looping without getting kinks is not easy.

3: Don't scrimp and save on the tubing. I bought 5m of tubing under $2 at a local store. They kink at the slightest bend, and turn dangerously soft in warm water.
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September 5, 2012 6:05:56 PM

With all the mistakes learnt from above, I set out to rebuild my rig. (Also had to save some money first)



Also, I added GPU blocks and Motherboard blocks.

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September 5, 2012 6:16:45 PM

Added a 120mm EK XTX rad. To call it huge is a major understatement.


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September 5, 2012 6:29:31 PM

Added the fans for the radiators.





Noticed the distinct color of Noctua's fans in the PSU? ;) 
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September 6, 2012 6:00:31 PM

Ordered a 12V, 400W Peltier Plate from Ebay. Can't wait for it to arrive. I guess I'll need a separate 12V PSU just to power it.

Won't be attaching it directly onto the CPU, because I'll have to deal with condensation issues, not to mention heat buildup issues.

Instead, I'll be using it to cool the water in my loop. This way, it doesn't matter even if it's inefficient. In fact, I'm hoping it won't be efficient enough for condensation to start forming.
Will probably be welding my NH-D14 to its hot side, to get rid of the heat.


Also, I'm going to spray the fans red and the Motherboard Waterblock black.
Will have to find some plastic and acrylic-safe paint first.
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a c 190 K Overclocking
September 6, 2012 7:07:40 PM

Check Ryans subambient cooling thread for peltier tricks,
You're on the right track though
Moto
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September 7, 2012 11:02:22 AM

Omg, thanks for pointing me there.

I found answers to a few of my major problems.

YAY!

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a c 177 K Overclocking
September 7, 2012 11:26:38 AM

This kind of setup and level of modification is well out of the realm of what I am familiar with, but you have done a damn fine job. That is possibly one of the best machines I have ever seen.
Despite having so much inside that case, with the (IMO) ugly-as Noctua fans, you have somehow made it look beautiful.
I applaud you good sir!

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September 7, 2012 11:42:29 AM

Hey, thanks a lot for the compliment!! It really means a lot to me, because I'm actually also pretty new to all these too. My first build (came with the stock Intel cooler) arrived on 23 Nov 2011.

Before that, I was comparing laptops to desktops based on the Clock Speed. More GHz = Better.

I owe all my knowledge to the people over here. Not just the guys in the forums, but also the guys who writes articles.
(If you guys are seeing this, a big thank you to you!)

About the Noctua issue, i admit it's an eyesore. So what do you think of this?

It's not yet completed. Started raining when i was halfway through spraying it.


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a c 177 K Overclocking
September 7, 2012 12:02:54 PM

That's about 6 months longer than I'v been at it. I only became interested in computer's since April this year, and only from afar till I could build my current rig (in my sig) in June. It becomes an obsession after a while, constantly researching.

Thankfully before that I knew nothing, I wouldn't have known what Ghz meant in terms of computers. No opportunity to embarrass myself.
My rig before this one wasn't built by me and had a Phenom 995 (just Phenom, not Phenom II), stock cooling, an MSI AM2 motherboard of some sort and a passively cooled Gigabyte 9800GT (which would have been fine, if there were any fans on the rig. A computer repair guy had to point out the burn marks on the PCB before I realized there was a problem).
That was how little I knew and how old I let my PC get.

That looks pretty good, I personally would have had a black frame with just the fan blades red (because of my red/black colour scheme), but that will look pretty good in your rig.
I love the small irony that you have an Intel system and everything is red. Though I suppose I am doing that too.
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September 7, 2012 12:09:13 PM

Got pretty bored earlier on while waiting for the fan's paint coat to dry, so I grabbed some other stuff to spray and kill time.


How does it look? I'm not sure whether I find it ugly, or i'm just not used to my case looking like that. Somehow it just looks... weird.

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a c 177 K Overclocking
September 7, 2012 12:17:36 PM

I think that looks really nice actually. Red accents along the front and top of the case draw the eye along it, rather than getting lost in its dense black. Gives it a nice sense of scale as well, you can see how long it is a lot easier than if it were all black.

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September 7, 2012 12:22:03 PM

Woah seriously? I thought you started much earlier, given your addict rank in this forum.

Hahaha, I see i see. Talking about old times... I didn't believe in thermal paste back then. Thought the paste will seep into the CPU and kill it somehow. And I was wondering why my computer kept thermal throttling. I swear that was a pretty epic moment in my life.

As for the fans, I can only do a single color, because it's not possible to separate a Noctua fan blades from its case without breaking something.
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September 7, 2012 12:29:04 PM

Haha, technically speaking, the case isn't all black. It actually came with gold strips. At that point in time, i really didn't know much about computers, all I knew was that I had to remove those strips immediately. =D

Alright, guess I'll keep it then.

As for the colours of my setup, the red and black scheme was to match my motherboard. (Rampage IV Extreme). But yeah you're right, red and black is also the colours for AMD.
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a c 177 K Overclocking
September 7, 2012 12:43:21 PM

Nup, joined Friday, May 11 2012. As I said above, researching my PC was an obsession. Now that its done (for a while yet anyway), its manifested into researching and helping other peoples computers.

Dont think I have anything to top that.
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September 7, 2012 12:58:44 PM

I see. Well, all the best and have fun!
Helping other people's computers? After I posted pictures of this rig on facebook, my friends started calling me and asking me about computers.

I found it pretty fun going around opening all kinds of cases, and seeing all kind of different hardware inside.

But sadly most issues were usually software related. ( Most people just don't get the hardware/software part ) and I'm a total idiot at software related problems... Which is pretty dumb because I'm a programmer. Urgh.
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a c 177 K Overclocking
September 7, 2012 1:14:58 PM

Same, a friend mentioned that his PC died recently. Brought it over, popped open the case and one explosion of dust later, went back home with an old PSU of mine (his had died), my 9800GT (may have been a 8600GT come to think of it), 2 more GB of DDR2 RAM, a red LED fan and a re-pasted CPU.
In exchange he installed Ubuntu on a spare HDD I have in my rig and ran through the basics of how to use it. Kinda funny how he's all about software and OS', knows nothing really about hardware and I'm the exact opposite. The extent of my programming knowledge is how to ping websites in Command Prompt...
Apparently his machine has run perfectly since then, not as loud and its performance in games is much improved (was running on Pentium integrated graphics, anythings an improvement).
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a c 239 K Overclocking
September 7, 2012 1:57:38 PM

mikolrayne said:
Ordered a 12V, 400W Peltier Plate from Ebay. Can't wait for it to arrive. I guess I'll need a separate 12V PSU just to power it.

Won't be attaching it directly onto the CPU, because I'll have to deal with condensation issues, not to mention heat buildup issues.

Instead, I'll be using it to cool the water in my loop. This way, it doesn't matter even if it's inefficient. In fact, I'm hoping it won't be efficient enough for condensation to start forming.
Will probably be welding my NH-D14 to its hot side, to get rid of the heat.


Also, I'm going to spray the fans red and the Motherboard Waterblock black.
Will have to find some plastic and acrylic-safe paint first.


I like this thread you are not afraid to share with others your learned the hard way experiences, now that you have arrived at peltier world, I have some advice for you, first do some investigating, the power supply is very important in relation to getting all you can from the peltier.

Important is what does your peltier specs require, regarding DC operating voltage, and amperage load, I have addressed your post in my thread, but here I want to share with you power supply options, This power supply meets my peltier needs and is on my future to buy list.

For you acquiring this information from the beginning may save you a learning the hard way experience, that website has just about any power supply on the planet, and you want a switching power supply to save electrical cost.

Obtaining a power supply directly capable of handling your peltier needs is important, traditional computer power supplies even the single hi amp 12v rail power supplies can only deliver 12v no matter how many amps it can handle.

And to share a learned the hard way experience with you, you cannot use the molex lines to power your peltier if you went with a traditional computer power supply.

Molex lines are 18g, and not large enough to handle the load, you would have to get your power from the 8 pin motherboard plug which is 14g wire, I used 2 of the 14g positive and 2 of the negative each set soldered to 10g feed lines, from my power supply to get the power needed without burning out my wiring harness.

You won't have to worry about that if you buy the right power supply from the beginning, but specs are important the power supply has to be capable of beyond your peltier needs regarding amperage, because that peltier draws solid power from the instant it is energized.

If you have any direct questions you can PM me directly, but there's a great advantage to posting your discoveries here so others can learn!

Ryan
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a c 239 K Overclocking
September 7, 2012 2:08:37 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
Check Ryans subambient cooling thread for peltier tricks,
You're on the right track though
Moto


Thanks for the recomendation, Moto!

Ry
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September 8, 2012 6:01:52 AM

4Ryan6 said:
I like this thread you are not afraid to share with others your learned the hard way experiences, now that you have arrived at peltier world, I have some advice for you, first do some investigating, the power supply is very important in relation to getting all you can from the peltier.

Important is what does your peltier specs require, regarding DC operating voltage, and amperage load, I have addressed your post in my thread, but here I want to share with you power supply options, This power supply meets my peltier needs and is on my future to buy list.

For you acquiring this information from the beginning may save you a learning the hard way experience, that website has just about any power supply on the planet, and you want a switching power supply to save electrical cost.

Obtaining a power supply directly capable of handling your peltier needs is important, traditional computer power supplies even the single hi amp 12v rail power supplies can only deliver 12v no matter how many amps it can handle.

And to share a learned the hard way experience with you, you cannot use the molex lines to power your peltier if you went with a traditional computer power supply.

Molex lines are 18g, and not large enough to handle the load, you would have to get your power from the 8 pin motherboard plug which is 14g wire, I used 2 of the 14g positive and 2 of the negative each set soldered to 10g feed lines, from my power supply to get the power needed without burning out my wiring harness.

You won't have to worry about that if you buy the right power supply from the beginning, but specs are important the power supply has to be capable of beyond your peltier needs regarding amperage, because that peltier draws solid power from the instant it is energized.

If you have any direct questions you can PM me directly, but there's a great advantage to posting your discoveries here so others can learn!

Ryan



Haha woahhh information overload!
Technically speaking, I'm not in the Peltier world yet. No idea why it's taking so long for it to get delivered. Didn't use registered mail, and I hope it didn't get delivered to someone else by accident.
I was thinking of using my current Silverstone ST1000-G for the peltier plate, since I'll have to upgrade my rig's PSU to 1200W to add my 3rd 6970 into my rig.
Thinking of taking my PSU apart and rebuilding it, leaving only Power On and 12V output for the peltier. Plenty of guides out there for PSU modding, don't really foresee much issues. I'll just remember to use cables that will be able to support the load.

No problem. Thank you for popping by and guiding me through. Will update my progress once the peltier plate comes!
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September 8, 2012 6:07:49 AM

manofchalk said:
Same, a friend mentioned that his PC died recently. Brought it over, popped open the case and one explosion of dust later, went back home with an old PSU of mine (his had died), my 9800GT (may have been a 8600GT come to think of it), 2 more GB of DDR2 RAM, a red LED fan and a re-pasted CPU.
In exchange he installed Ubuntu on a spare HDD I have in my rig and ran through the basics of how to use it. Kinda funny how he's all about software and OS', knows nothing really about hardware and I'm the exact opposite. The extent of my programming knowledge is how to ping websites in Command Prompt...
Apparently his machine has run perfectly since then, not as loud and its performance in games is much improved (was running on Pentium integrated graphics, anythings an improvement).



Haha!! That's like barter trading on modern technology. And they said barter trading will die out =o
Anyway at the risk of me sounding like a total idiot, I would like to know what're you using Ubuntu for? I have it on Virtual Machine, but all I didn't know what to do with it. Just went in once, explored a bit and closed it .
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a c 177 K Overclocking
September 8, 2012 6:50:59 AM

mikolrayne said:
but all I didn't know what to do with it. Just went in once, explored a bit and closed it .


Thats about the extent of my usage of it. Having Ubuntu was more of an insurance policy if Windows (or the SSD holding it) were to fail. Would still have a machine that could do something, even if I was unfamiliar with it.

And to make useful a HDD I had laying around. Due to various circumstances, I had 4 drives with a total of ~2.25TB of storage that was going to waste. So installing Linux on one of them would at least make it somewhat useful. That leaves me with 2TB of storage left... Still got no clue what to do with it.
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a c 150 K Overclocking
September 8, 2012 7:15:23 AM

Got any spare NF-F12's laying around? :p 
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September 8, 2012 10:05:42 AM

Nope. I'm still short of 2 F12s for the peltier plate setup. =(
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September 8, 2012 10:07:58 AM

manofchalk said:
Thats about the extent of my usage of it. Having Ubuntu was more of an insurance policy if Windows (or the SSD holding it) were to fail. Would still have a machine that could do something, even if I was unfamiliar with it.

And to make useful a HDD I had laying around. Due to various circumstances, I had 4 drives with a total of ~2.25TB of storage that was going to waste. So installing Linux on one of them would at least make it somewhat useful. That leaves me with 2TB of storage left... Still got no clue what to do with it.



Damn, I wished I had spare hard drives laying around. I always wanted to set up a RAID 10 array.
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September 8, 2012 4:14:36 PM

Been facing some issues with spray painting, thus the slow progress. Again, while waiting for the fan to dry, I played around with the strips.

Did some light sanding and gave it a few more layers of Red paint, then a few layers of clear coat on top.

So what's life without pictures?
...
...
Life.



The white thing at the bottom is the reflection of my lamp.



These are the ones that turned out better. I realized that dirt and small particles get stuck on the surface while drying, causing small bumps. Will shelter anything I spray paint from now on with a piece of cardboard or similar.

And here's the completed fan



The fan blades were the most problematic.
First, while spraying the fan casing, the blades always managed to catch a bit of paint, which created a thick layer of mess that couldn't dry. Had to sandpaper and scrub the whole layer of paint away.
Then, I wanted to give the blades a proper coat. This time, the case got in the way. Sandpaper, scrub that part on the case.

Finally managed to get it completed though. Applied a few layers of clear coat on top too.
The fan is still spinning fine, and I'm reading guides on spraying paint. Hopefully my second attempt will turn out better!



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September 8, 2012 4:27:56 PM

Anyway, here's a little guide to show why I personally feel that it's pretty safe to spray it in 1 piece. This is my first attempt at making a guide, so please bear with me.


DISCLAIMER : I am not suggesting that anyone should follow this idea, nor am I saying that this will not spoil fans. All I am trying to do, is to show why I find it safe.

Also, no Noctua fans were harmed in the making of this guide... ... They just got destroyed and decimated.

Lastly, please let me know if you spot any flaws in my thinking, before I proceed on with spraying the rest of my fans.





On the left is my Noctua NF-F12 fan, on the right is also an NF-F12. I've cut the propeller blades and removed the piece of plastic on top of the green PCB for this demonstration. Take note that PCB was originally secured to the casing above.

Because the paint will be in contact with the PCB, so be sure your paint is not conductive. Generally, most Acrylic paints won't face any issue with this.



Top down view. Take note that the gold circle in the middle of the left fan is not part of the sticker, but rather the same gold circle shown on the right . Holes were cut in the sticker so it could be shown. That's the back of Noctua's SSO2 bearing.



Flipped everything around to allow the SSO2 bearing ( extreme right ) to stand, so it's easier to visualize everything.



This is how the fan blades are attached. The only way to remove the blades is to break the plastic piece joined to the SSO2 bearing.



Paint WILL be able to reach the insides through



this gap between the PCB and metal ring if you spray from the sides. But it is shielded pretty well by the fan blades from the bottom, and fan casing from the top. So I suggest minimal spraying of the blades from the sides. However, as shown in the picture below,



the gap between the magnets are quite far apart, therefore it should be alright if some paint do seep in.

Referring to the previous picture again,



another area to keep an eye on is the gap between the PCB and metal ring. It should be alright if you get paint in there, so long your paint do not start pooling and start causing friction or gumming the whole fan up.



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September 8, 2012 4:43:04 PM

Here are just some additional pictures for the SSO2 Bearing. Since it is all sealed up and quite well protected, the chances of paint gumming it up is pretty slim.









That's pretty much all I have so far.

I'll end off with a cliffhanger. Maybe it's possible to remove the blades without breaking anything after all.
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September 16, 2012 4:42:52 PM

Haven't been updating lately. Been pretty busy.

Peltier plate just arrived anyway.
Also, just finished spraying 4 fans. Still has some minor issues with spray painting.
Might have to sand the old paint off and respray.

DSLR has some firmware issues, will update with pictures ASAP.
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September 29, 2012 7:02:57 PM

Overdue photos of my peltier plate.





I'm pretty sure these wires will not be able to support a load of approximately 26 Ohms. Will figure something out soon.



Lacking quite a bit of cash right now, so I have to pause the peltier plate project for the time-being.

As for the fans, I'm still in the midst of completing the spraying. My biggest issue is the paint pooling on the fan blades itself. Still trying to scrape the lumps of hardened paint off the blades. Urgh. Never imagined that spray painting would be so tough.
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a c 190 K Overclocking
September 29, 2012 7:15:41 PM

Hehe, light coats padawan, many light coats :) 
I know the feeling on money, i was onto my chiller project but saw something that is vital for another project I have planned so I may get those instead, it hurts to be creative sometimes :p 
Moto
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a c 150 K Overclocking
September 29, 2012 9:40:43 PM

How's watercooling in this case?

Or at least the fan arrangements for rads....

On their website it says you can fit a 360mm rad, so I assume you have a 240mm rad on the bottom right?
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September 30, 2012 7:09:27 AM

Motopsychojdn said:
Hehe, light coats padawan, many light coats :) 
I know the feeling on money, i was onto my chiller project but saw something that is vital for another project I have planned so I may get those instead, it hurts to be creative sometimes :p 
Moto


Haha, I'm always getting a matt finish when I spray light coats. Need thicker coats to make it glossy and shiny. Am I doing something wrong?
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September 30, 2012 7:40:35 AM

amuffin said:
How's watercooling in this case?

Or at least the fan arrangements for rads....

On their website it says you can fit a 360mm rad, so I assume you have a 240mm rad on the bottom right?


I find this a pretty decent watercooling case, considering that it was designed for air cooling. Everything fits, but it'll require some modding.

Didn't expect to step into watercooling, or I would have went for a Corsair 800D instead.

Fans arrangement wise, the fans on the 240mm rad at the bottom are intake fans, the fans on the 120mm and 360mm are exhaust fans. There are 2 more intake fans at the bay area, and 1 exhaust fan on the other side of the case.

Umm, that information is wrong. The length of the bottom from end to end is 360mm. Meaning a 360mm rad will have to be exactly 360mm to fit the bottom. =( Hence I'm using a 240mm rad instead.
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a c 150 K Overclocking
September 30, 2012 7:46:55 AM

Ah, I see.

Did you have to mod the case to fit the 360mm rad?
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September 30, 2012 8:05:19 AM

Yup.

The back originally looked like this. Had to cut out a rectangle hole and drill mounting holes to fit that radiator.
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September 30, 2012 8:16:33 AM

Managed to overclock my 6970s to 1015MHz Clock and 1450MHz Memory. Primary card running at 47°C and secondary card running at 49°C after half hour of Furmark with my aircon set at 25°C. Made a huge mistake by pairing a reference XFX 6970 with a Sapphire Dual Fan 6970. Had no problem running the Sapphire at 1035MHz Clock, but the XFX was unable to reach that speed. Experimented running both cards at different speeds, but I faced some weird micro-stuttering issues. Thus I had to lower the clocks to 1015MHz.

Here's my scores for 3DMark11.





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September 30, 2012 8:40:31 AM

And here's my results for my CPU Overclocking.



Ran Prime95 from 14:01 to 16:10.

If you're wondering why the maximum temperature reached for every core was between 14:15 to 14:27 instead of somewhere nearer to 16:10, that's because my aircon was accidentally switched off somewhere around the start of the test.

Switched it on after that and temps dropped by a few degrees.
The room temperature over here is around 33°C in the day, and my aircon runs at 25°C.

Regarding my overclocking, I have no idea why my chip will not do anything above 4.5GHz++, no matter how much voltage I throw at it. Even with an increase of 0.1V core voltage, the multiplier still won't bulge. Tried using the 100MHz strap, the maximum I reached was also 100*45 = 4500MHz.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Here's my current settings.
BLCK:127MHz
CPU Strap: 125MHz
CPU Ratio: 36.0
VCore:1.315V
VCCSA:1.10V
CPUPLL: 1.80V
VTTCPU: 1.10V
2nd VTTCPU: 1.059V
PCH 1.1: 1.10V
PCH 1.5: 1.50V

CPU Load-Line Calibration: High
CPU Current Capability: 180%
CPU Voltage Frequency: 1100Khz

VCCSA Load Line Calibration: High
VCCSA Current Capability: 130%
VCCSA Fixed Frequency: 500Khz

CPU Power Phase Control: Extreme
CPU Power Duty Control: Extreme
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