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GTX 570 Keeps Crashing

Last response: in Overclocking
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September 9, 2012 5:12:12 PM

I need the community's help desperately right now! Ok, so when I bump my EVGA GTX 570's clocks from default to 920 MHz core clock 1840 MHz Shader Clock and 2200 memory with the voltage bumped to the max 1.1, I don't even get into BF3 and my display crashes. Keeping in mind that I have my fan settings at 75% which is really noisy and the card still runs at 80 degrees. This is my first computer I built myself, and not really knowing that much about GPU's and safe temps.

So I'm asking the community to help me out!

Thanks!

More about : gtx 570 crashing

a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2012 5:24:21 PM

Don't try to overclock all variables at once.

First sort out the core clock. (take the other variables back to stock)
Then move on to other variables.
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September 9, 2012 5:59:00 PM

Yeah that worked but I have to keep my fan at 80 percent and thats really loud..
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2012 6:01:26 PM

sharpshooter_992 said:
Yeah that worked but I have to keep my fan at 80 percent and thats really loud..


Lowering the voltage will lower temps, but then you might have to back down your clock speed. (maybe not)

You could also try installing a case fan to force cool air to the card's intake fan.
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September 10, 2012 9:38:41 PM

Z1NONLY said:
Lowering the voltage will lower temps, but then you might have to back down your clock speed. (maybe not)

You could also try installing a case fan to force cool air to the card's intake fan.


Well I have 5 fans already installed in my case. Do you think moving it to a place with higher air-circulation would decrease temps?
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2012 10:37:53 PM

sharpshooter_992 said:
Well I have 5 fans already installed in my case. Do you think moving it to a place with higher air-circulation would decrease temps?


The trick is to drive cool into the card's fan intake. (I'm assuming it brings air in at the fan and forces it out the back of the computer)

The location of the fan on that particular card (at the back) may put it out of the path of many side-mount fans.

I would put a very powerful fan at the bottom of my case because that would put it almost directly under the card's intake.

You have to look at your case layout to determine the best location for fan(s) to help cool your card in your case.

The voltage may just be so high that nothing short of a Peltier plate can keep it cool.

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September 10, 2012 10:58:31 PM

Z1NONLY said:
The trick is to drive cool into the card's fan intake. (I'm assuming it brings air in at the fan and forces it out the back of the computer)

The location of the fan on that particular card (at the back) may put it out of the path of many side-mount fans.

I would put a very powerful fan at the bottom of my case because that would put it almost directly under the card's intake.

You have to look at your case layout to determine the best location for fan(s) to help cool your card in your case.

The voltage may just be so high that nothing short of a Peltier plate can keep it cool.


Looking through the glass in my case right now I see that that GPU is facing downwards, which throws away all the heat to the bottom. The bottom is the only place where I don't have a fan. But it is optional to install a 120mm fan or a 140mm fan, which one will be better? And any suggestions where I can find a cheap fan?
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2012 11:47:57 PM

I would expect it to pull air in from the bottom and throw away heat out the back of the computer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centrifugal_fan

If the fan is blowing hot air into the case and straight down, I would consider using the bottom fan to also exhaust air and help the air on its way out of the case. (It's important to be very sure which way the air is going and help it move in the same direction)

This is one of the best bargains on the market, but they don't have real high air flow and you only need one fan.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have one of these and it moves air pretty well, but it's (was) expensive for a fan: (looks like it's out of stock ATM)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



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September 10, 2012 11:52:52 PM

Z1NONLY said:
I would expect it to pull air in from the bottom and throw away heat out the back of the computer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centrifugal_fan

If the fan is blowing hot air into the case and straight down, I would consider using the bottom fan to also exhaust air and help the air on its way out of the case. (It's important to be very sure which way the air is going and help it move in the same direction)

This is one of the best bargains on the market, but they don't have real high air flow and you only need one fan.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have one of these and it moves air pretty well, but it's (was) expensive for a fan: (looks like it's out of stock ATM)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


If I do put a fan on the bottom, wouldn't it just shoot the air right back on my gpu if it was under it?
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
September 11, 2012 12:36:07 AM

The direction of airflow with a standard case fan is just a matter of which way it is facing.

Are you 100% sure the video card fan is blowing air into the case rather than drawing air in at the fan, and forcing air out the card slot at the back of the computer case?
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a b U Graphics card
September 11, 2012 12:43:48 AM

sharpshooter_992 said:
I need the community's help desperately right now! Ok, so when I bump my EVGA GTX 570's clocks from default to 920 MHz core clock 1840 MHz Shader Clock and 2200 memory with the voltage bumped to the max 1.1, I don't even get into BF3 and my display crashes. Keeping in mind that I have my fan settings at 75% which is really noisy and the card still runs at 80 degrees. This is my first computer I built myself, and not really knowing that much about GPU's and safe temps.

So I'm asking the community to help me out!

Thanks!


I have overclocked a few 570's for some friends and the highest I could get 24/7 stable was 900 core. Try lowering the core a bit even at max voltage not all cards can handle 900+. Also dont OC all at once, make sure the core clock is stable and temps are under control with no artifacts then tackle memory.

But first try a 900 core clock, then work on the memory. Not sure what the default for your particular 570 is but 900 is a good OC. The 20 MHz difference wont translate into real world performance you can measure.
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a b U Graphics card
September 11, 2012 12:53:19 AM

From some of the reviews on newegg this card gets hot, so a good cooling setup is paramount. Try to get as much heat away from graphics card as possible. You might even have to go with an aftermarket gpu cooler. Quit trying to overclock until you get your cooling figured out. That video card does not have a ver good cooling solution to it.
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September 11, 2012 1:20:25 AM

Z1NONLY said:
The direction of airflow with a standard case fan is just a matter of which way it is facing.

Are you 100% sure the video card fan is blowing air into the case rather than drawing air in at the fan, and forcing air out the card slot at the back of the computer case?


Not 100% sure about that... But if its not drawing in air then its shooting it out towards an area in my case that's rather isolated from the rest of the fans. I can show you a picture if you would like. My GPU does take up all my motherboard space, rather long card.

Also I've lowered my clocks to 823 Core Clock. And I'm not messing with the memory because apparently 570's don't do well when you up the memory.

Thanks for all your help so far!
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
September 11, 2012 2:03:01 AM

I don't think I'm being clear. At one end of the card is the fan. At the other end of the card is a plate that you can see from OUTSIDE the computer. It has th connectors for your monitor cable and some vents.

I think air comes into the fan from inside the case. Then it is forced across the heat sink under the plastic cover that runs the length of the card. Then the air exits out that back panel where you plug the monitor cable into.

In this configuration, one end brings air in and the other end exhausts the air to the outside world.

One end (the fan, where I think it pulls air into the card) is inside the computer, the other (the plate where you plug in your monitor cable) is directly exposed to outside air.
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September 11, 2012 1:40:49 PM

Z1NONLY said:
I don't think I'm being clear. At one end of the card is the fan. At the other end of the card is a plate that you can see from OUTSIDE the computer. It has th connectors for your monitor cable and some vents.

I think air comes into the fan from inside the case. Then it is forced across the heat sink under the plastic cover that runs the length of the card. Then the air exits out that back panel where you plug the monitor cable into.

In this configuration, one end brings air in and the other end exhausts the air to the outside world.

One end (the fan, where I think it pulls air into the card) is inside the computer, the other (the plate where you plug in your monitor cable) is directly exposed to outside air.


Apologies, I'm new to this. But yes I put my hand near the rear IO and do feel air coming out. My thoughts were that the heat generated in the GPU area then was led to the fan which was then dispersed by the fan.
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a b K Overclocking
September 11, 2012 3:37:12 PM

Experience has shown me that stock Fermi cards are sometimes unstable out of the box. Both my GTX 580s were.

What you need to do is download MSI Afterburner. Keep your cards at stock clocks, or if overclocked revert to stock. Then increase the voltage to the next "notch"- You'll know what I mean as the voltage goes up by certain amounts, i.e. you can run them at 1113 mV's but if you try 1114, it'll automatically click up to 1118 mV or whatever.

Anyway, start off by incrementally increase the voltage two to three times but no more, test at each incremental increase. Don't decrease clock speed yet. If you're still having issues, come back and let us know.

Set a fan profile such that at around 70 degrees your fans are above 75% throttle, if not higher. Noisy, but that's what the fans are there for- to keep your GPU cool. Suck it up and blast those mothers/that single mother with some air!

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Best solution

a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
September 11, 2012 3:38:59 PM

In that case, a powerful fan at the bottom of your case, pushing air toward your GPU fan intake, will help.
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September 11, 2012 10:18:07 PM

Z1NONLY said:
In that case, a powerful fan at the bottom of your case, pushing air toward your GPU fan intake, will help.


Thanks! You helped me through all this! So I guess i'll be putting a a 6th fan on my case.
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September 11, 2012 10:20:25 PM

Best answer selected by sharpshooter_992.
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