Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Are these pressure calculations for WC accurate?

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
September 14, 2012 3:25:56 PM

Yes, I've read the sticky, I found a link on there leading to charliehorse55's WC thread on another forum.
Over there he has made a small list like so:

Quote:
Pressure Drop figures for components
Radiators: 0.20 PSI each (the size of the radiator has no real effect)
CPU Block: 1.1 PSI
GPU block: 0.9 PSI
Motherboard block: 2.0 PSI (fullcover)
Fittings: 0.3 PSI for the entire loop
Tubing: 0.5 PSI per meter (3.3 feet)
Reservoir: Negligible


I'm on the final stages of building my PC, compiling a list of WC components and for the pressure I've calculated 11.8 PSI total for my entire loop.
That's 1 Radiator
1 CPU block
3 GPU blocks
1 motherboard block (it's doesn't cover the mobo head-toe like the asus motherboard armour)
2 Metre tubing (probably will only use one metre, still working on this)
16 fittings

I suppose my main question is do the fittings cause any restriction if they're clamped at the base of the input/output for any blocks?

Since I'll be using high quality tubing (ones that curve without closing on its self) I wont be using any fittings to co-ordinate the tubing, so was wondering if I should calculate the fittings PSI, even though they're only keeping the cable attached to the blocks.

I'll be using the fittings like this: http://cdn.overclock.net/4/47/479f63e8_vbattach190468.j...
At the base of the blocks, and not to curve the cable.
a c 330 K Overclocking
September 14, 2012 5:35:38 PM

Yes, his calculations are pretty much as close as you are going to get without a labcoat and lots of equipment.

Anything in the loop is going to introduce flow reduction due to restriction of some sort.
m
0
l
September 14, 2012 5:51:21 PM

Even the fittings used to tighten the cable to input/output?
Would a fitting still have a 0.3 PSI restriction if it's used to connect the tubing to the components?
If so, I'm getting 4.8 PSI from just the basic fittings needed to clamp the tubing to the components.
m
0
l
Related resources
September 14, 2012 5:56:30 PM

Btw I'm just gonna use the fittings as clamps, to clamp the tubing onto the components, would it be better to use clamps instead of fittings?
Would I need to accommodate PSI for them?
m
0
l
September 14, 2012 6:04:49 PM

Oddly enough I can't edit my own messages, but the Laing D5 Strong (8-24V DC Pump) is being rated as pumping 50PSI. Surely this is not correct?
m
0
l
a c 330 K Overclocking
September 14, 2012 6:17:30 PM

This only applies to components that come in contact with the water- a fitting is a fitting. A compression fitting has 2 components but is a single fitting. The threaded 'clamp' portion doesn't have any impact on the flow, but the rest of the fitting does.

Why wouldn't that be correct? It likely is a max value, but sounds about right, but I've seen some that range it from 25psi - 50psi. I wouldn't worry that much about it.
m
0
l
September 14, 2012 6:20:48 PM

On this guide it says
"Now that you have the total pressure drop for your loop, find a pump that can handle at least that much pressure at 1 GPM of flow."

So I don't think that pump will hit 50PSI at 1 GPM of flow.
Is there a way to calculate this?
m
0
l
a c 330 K Overclocking
September 14, 2012 6:27:46 PM

You'd actually have to know exactly how much pressure drop you'll encounter based on hardware you don't currently own with the data estimated about pumps in question.

To be honest, I would run 2 DDC pumps instead of a D5 if I were you. They run a higher rated head pressure even though the flowrate is lower than a D5. However, in restrictive loop, head pressure > flow rate.

Look into a D5 with aftermarket top, MCP35x (with/without top) or even dual MCP355's.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2012 6:32:46 PM

You would have to know if it's a Centrifugal or Reciprocating pump
m
0
l
!