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Asrock Z77-M/ 2500K

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  • Intel
  • Overclocking
  • Product
Last response: in Overclocking
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September 16, 2012 8:04:24 PM

Hello Everyone,

I've run into some issues and high temperatures while attempting to OC my 2500k on the Z77 micro. First the computer specs:

CPU: I5-2500K
GPU: EVGA GTX 560ti
PSU: Antec 480watts
MOBO: Asrock z77 micro atx
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 8gb (2x4gb)
SDD: OCZ Agility 3 60gb
Coolmaster Hyper 212 plus w/ Artic Silver 5 Thermal Compound (1 pea sized dot directly in the middle of the CPU)
5 x 120mm fans in push/pull configuration

I did the automatic overclock feature provided in UEFI and set it to a 4.2 overclock, ran prime95 temps went up to 90+ C then computer shut down, idle temps are 35-37 C (Using Real Temp) At first I thought the heatsink wasn't seated properly, so I reseated to the very best of my abilities, and the same issues continued. I know im cutting it close with the 480 watt PSU, could that explain the high temperatures? What else could be the cause of the high temperatures, because I know a 4.2ghz overclock on the 2500k is a great overclock and isn't asking for too much.

More about : asrock z77 2500k

a b å Intel
a c 150 K Overclocking
September 16, 2012 8:16:01 PM

Hi.
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a c 130 å Intel
a c 139 K Overclocking
September 16, 2012 8:21:53 PM

Will you be overclocking your i5-2500k? It looks like a good day for it.
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September 16, 2012 8:23:03 PM

Haha Sorry guys. Hit enter on my original post "prematurely"
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September 16, 2012 8:30:59 PM

The auto overclock may be adding too much voltage in the mix. Try setting the CPU voltage to the stock clock reading and work slowly up from there.
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a b å Intel
a c 140 K Overclocking
September 16, 2012 8:31:03 PM

Antec is a good brand, if it has two 6 pin connectors, you should be ok.

Because your idle temps are ok, I think your cooler is attached properly.

I think it is better to oc using the bios and not the asrock utilities.
They will oc the fsb which can lead to instability quickly.

Start by leaving everything on auto and gradually increase the multiplier.
See how high you can go without needing a voltage adjustment.

Once you get to 4.0, there is little benefit from pushing it higher.
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September 16, 2012 8:37:25 PM

geofelt said:
Antec is a good brand, if it has two 6 pin connectors, you should be ok.

Because your idle temps are ok, I think your cooler is attached properly.

I think it is better to oc using the bios and not the asrock utilities.
They will oc the fsb which can lead to instability quickly.

Start by leaving everything on auto and gradually increase the multiplier.
See how high you can go without needing a voltage adjustment.

Once you get to 4.0, there is little benefit from pushing it higher.



This is the exact PSU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

So is it possible to manually overclock to 4.2 and get temperatures below 80 C while stress testing?

How do I know when its time for a voltage adjustment? Once temps get too high or the pc restarts?
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Best solution

a c 130 å Intel
a c 139 K Overclocking
September 16, 2012 8:38:44 PM

When you applied the thermal compound in a pes size amount did you spread it over the whole cpu or just leave it an let the heatsink spread it?
I think that the best way is to spread it over the whole cpu top and that way you'll be sure that the layer is an even thin layer over the top of the cpu. If your not careful with the thermal compound and there is a too thick an amount it could act as an insulator and build up heat.
That's the only reason that there could be a heat overload because the overclock of 4.2ghz is not that high to be causing heat issues and the auto preset overclock of 4.2ghz takes your msking a mistake with a wrong setting.
In order to verify that the auto preset setting is not defective and has the wrong setting programed into it you should do an overclock yourself. Start with raising the multiplier and shoot for a normal overclock that doesn't require you to add any voltage. You should be able to get to about 4ghz witout adding voltage and that way you can see what the temps are doing without adding voltage.
Your psu should not be causing high temps and usually doesn't have anything to do with the cpu temps.
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September 16, 2012 8:41:50 PM

inzone said:
When you applied the thermal compound in a pes size amount did you spread it over the whole cpu or just leave it an let the heatsink spread it?
I think that the best way is to spread it over the whole cpu top and that way you'll be sure that the layer is an even thin layer over the top of the cpu. If your not careful with the thermal compound and there is a too thick an amount it could act as an insulator and build up heat.
That's the only reason that there could be a heat overload because the overclock of 4.2ghz is not that high to be causing heat issues and the auto preset overclock of 4.2ghz takes your msking a mistake with a wrong setting.
In order to verify that the auto preset setting is not defective and has the wrong setting programed into it you should do an overclock yourself. Start with raising the multiplier and shoot for a normal overclock that doesn't require you to add any voltage. You should be able to get to about 4ghz witout adding voltage and that way you can see what the temps are doing without adding voltage.
Your psu should not be causing high temps and usually doesn't have anything to do with the cpu temps.



Thanks exactly what I was thinking. I did not spread the compound, I left it for the heatsink to spread. I will test and get back to you.
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a c 130 å Intel
a c 139 K Overclocking
September 16, 2012 8:44:09 PM

You will know when to add voltage when Windows becomes unstable. As I said an overclock of 4.2ghz is not that high and you shouldn't have to add much voltabe and you can actually almost get there without adding voltage. Just take it one step at a time and you can see what your cpu is doing every step of the way.
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September 16, 2012 8:44:27 PM

inzone said:
When you applied the thermal compound in a pes size amount did you spread it over the whole cpu or just leave it an let the heatsink spread it?
I think that the best way is to spread it over the whole cpu top and that way you'll be sure that the layer is an even thin layer over the top of the cpu. If your not careful with the thermal compound and there is a too thick an amount it could act as an insulator and build up heat.
That's the only reason that there could be a heat overload because the overclock of 4.2ghz is not that high to be causing heat issues and the auto preset overclock of 4.2ghz takes your msking a mistake with a wrong setting.
In order to verify that the auto preset setting is not defective and has the wrong setting programed into it you should do an overclock yourself. Start with raising the multiplier and shoot for a normal overclock that doesn't require you to add any voltage. You should be able to get to about 4ghz witout adding voltage and that way you can see what the temps are doing without adding voltage.
Your psu should not be causing high temps and usually doesn't have anything to do with the cpu temps.



I see that you have a custom water cooling system, you don't by any chances have pictures? I'm interested in seeing what that looks like
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a b å Intel
a c 140 K Overclocking
September 16, 2012 8:45:41 PM

ashehadeh1 said:
This is the exact PSU http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

So is it possible to manually overclock to 4.2 and get temperatures below 80 C while stress testing?

How do I know when its time for a voltage adjustment? Once temps get too high or the pc restarts?


How well you can OC is partly determined by your luck of the binning.

Use realtemp to monitor temps. When you approach tjmax, you have gone a bit too far.
I would not make any voltage adjustments at all. Be satisfied with a conservative OC that does not need one.
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September 16, 2012 8:46:15 PM

Quote:
"Change voltage type to offset mode.
Offset voltage +0.005v
Multiplier 40

Set LLC to 3, though this may need to change.

Spread Spectrum: disabled
Everything else on
C3 off
C6 off
C state package on/auto

If this doesn't boot/isn't stable/gives you a BSOD, use this list:
http://www.overclock.net/t/935829/the-overclockers-bsod...

If you see your BSOD code there, do the recommended action.
If it doesn't BSOD and just shuts off or freezes, bump vcore up another 0.005v.

Continue this cycle until you're stable. But, 4ghz shouldn't require any more than a 0.010v offset, it's a relatively small overclock. You should be fine with 0.005."





I pulled this off another thread, how relative is this information to my overclock?
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a b å Intel
a c 140 K Overclocking
September 16, 2012 8:50:07 PM

ashehadeh1 said:
Thanks exactly what I was thinking. I did not spread the compound, I left it for the heatsink to spread. I will test and get back to you.


Opinions differ on this. I favor the single drop method. when you remove the heat sink next, you should see that the paste has spread where it needs to go. The advantage of a single drop is that you will get no air bubbles.
As a compromise, one can prime the surfaces with paste that gets wiped off with a credit card. The residual will fill some microscopic holes. Then a single drop completes the job.

Your temperatures seem normal, do not expect to see much of a difference whatever method you use.
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September 16, 2012 9:11:40 PM

geofelt said:
Opinions differ on this. I favor the single drop method. when you remove the heat sink next, you should see that the paste has spread where it needs to go. The advantage of a single drop is that you will get no air bubbles.
As a compromise, one can prime the surfaces with paste that gets wiped off with a credit card. The residual will fill some microscopic holes. Then a single drop completes the job.

Your temperatures seem normal, do not expect to see much of a difference whatever method you use.


Yes this seems to be a never ending debate, but I will say wiping the paste with a credit card and adding a single drop is new to me, and sounds like a pretty nice method.
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a c 130 å Intel
a c 139 K Overclocking
September 17, 2012 12:20:47 AM

ashehadeh1 said:
I see that you have a custom water cooling system, you don't by any chances have pictures? I'm interested in seeing what that looks like


I have just now completed my makeover as I have swicched out the MB, cpu, ram, video cards,watercooling parts and some other minor things. I have another day for clean up so I can take some pics tomorrow of the new build. For now I will see if I can find some old pics of what I had , so that you can tell the difference the old theme was red and the new one is blue.
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a c 130 å Intel
a c 139 K Overclocking
September 17, 2012 12:23:21 AM




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September 17, 2012 1:38:41 AM

Best answer selected by ashehadeh1.
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a c 130 å Intel
a c 139 K Overclocking
September 17, 2012 3:11:02 AM

This is the Cooler Master HAF-X and to the right of the psu is a kind of cover that hides the cables that are attached to the psu. Gives it a cleaner look.
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September 19, 2012 2:24:09 AM

inzone said:
This is the Cooler Master HAF-X and to the right of the psu is a kind of cover that hides the cables that are attached to the psu. Gives it a cleaner look.

Nice. Keep up the good work man, and thanks for your help.
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a c 130 å Intel
a c 139 K Overclocking
September 19, 2012 3:09:37 AM

Your welcome.
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!