Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Trying to reach 4.6 with i7 2700k

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
September 21, 2012 2:47:51 PM

Hello,

I'm totally noob with OC but I have attempted to get my i7 2700k to reach 4.6 GHz. My first test was at 4.5 with Vcore at 1.4. Under Prime95 stress, one of the cores reached 87 degrees C. My cooler is a Corsair H60 and my case breathes very well. I stopped the test when I saw the 87 and now I have doubts about my system reaching 4.6, which seems to be achievable for most systems.

My question is more about the Vcore. I know that Vcore should vary with multiplier but 1.4 seems very conservative. That's just where I started.

Should I attempt to lower it to bring down the temps? If so, what is a good voltage to aim for?
What is a safe incremental drop to test with, i.e. should i go from 1.4 to 1.38 or 1.39 etc?

Here are my system specs:

Asus P8P67 EVO
i7 2700K
Geil EVO Corsa 16GB 1333MHz 9.9.9.24
Corsair H60
Radeon HD6950

Thanks everyone

More about : reach 2700k

September 21, 2012 3:49:10 PM

I'm no expert at overclocking, but from what I've read, temps can be brought down by reducing VPLL.
m
0
l
a c 218 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 1:06:43 AM

You should not be just putting in random numbers and starting an overclock at such a rediculously high number , If you want to damage your cpu you are going about it the right way. The Corsair H-60 is not a good choice to be going for an overclock of over 4.5 ghz. Having a voltage over 1.38v will shorten the life of your cpu if that voltage is maintained for an extended period of time.
It sounds to me like you don't have the patience or the knowledge to be doing an overclock and at the rate your going you'll be buying a new cpu.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 186 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 1:26:06 AM

Lower your voltage!!!

Most chips can hit 4.5ghz @1.3 ish volts.
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 10:18:03 AM

First, You need to find out the lowest stable voltage at stock clock of that i7 2700k. Lower the voltage and repeat intel burn test till it blue screen. Then bring it back up 1 notch and that is your stable voltage.

Once you know your lowest stable voltage, start on increasing the multiplier and overclock the CPU while slowly increasing the voltage and repeat intel burn test. Do this till you reach 4.5ghz or the voltage reaches 1.36V or the temp reach 80C for any core.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 10:28:14 AM

funny that people talk about shortened life spans with anything over 1.38 volts when sandybridge cpus havent been dying from 1.4 or more even.

ive been running at 1.44 volts for the last 2 years without so much as a hiccup
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 10:39:38 AM

neon neophyte said:
funny that people talk about shortened life spans with anything over 1.38 volts when sandybridge cpus havent been dying from 1.4 or more even.

ive been running at 1.44 volts for the last 2 years without so much as a hiccup


Every CPU is different, just because your CPU can go over that 1.36V maximum threshold per Intel spec for 2 years doesn't mean all other CPUs will. This 1.36V maximum voltage is recommended by Intel for 24/7 use without significant CPU degradation overtime.
m
0
l
September 22, 2012 3:36:59 PM

jacknhut said:
First, You need to find out the lowest stable voltage at stock clock of that i7 2700k. Lower the voltage and repeat intel burn test till it blue screen. Then bring it back up 1 notch and that is your stable voltage.

Once you know your lowest stable voltage, start on increasing the multiplier and overclock the CPU while slowly increasing the voltage and repeat intel burn test. Do this till you reach 4.5ghz or the voltage reaches 1.36V or the temp reach 80C for any core.


OK...so what IntelBurn test should I do? Is standard ok or should I do something different? My CPU has passed standard clocking at 1.25 Vcore with the standard test. I haven't had time to take it lower yet.

Also, when you say to "bring it up 1 notch" are you referring to 10 millivolts, 15, 20, etc?

Thank you all for your input. I'm trying to learn as much about this as I can so your help is appreciated.

m
0
l
a c 218 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 5:05:03 PM

Prime 95 is a good burn in testing software as is Pc mark , you couls even lpay BF3 for 12 hours to help burn in the cpu.
m
0
l
a c 218 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 5:09:33 PM

neon neophyte said:
funny that people talk about shortened life spans with anything over 1.38 volts when sandybridge cpus havent been dying from 1.4 or more even.

ive been running at 1.44 volts for the last 2 years without so much as a hiccup



I didn't say that the cpu couldn't run on 1.4v or even higher , it certianly can the thing you will do is shorten the life span and when you talk about life span what is the life span of a cpu 2 years , 5 years 10 years? What ever the actual life of the cpu is it will be shortened some by using the higher voltage for an extended period of time. To some it may not even matter because they will upgrade in three years any way but there are some who will keep thier cpu for as long as it will work.
m
0
l
September 22, 2012 8:29:55 PM

So my stock clock is stable at 1.05 volts. IntelBurn is stable after 5 runs on the High setting. Now it's time to start ramping up the CPU.

What is a good mark to start with? Should I go like +.025 volts for every 100 MHz in CPU clock?

Thanks again for the input.
m
0
l
a c 218 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 8:44:53 PM

You do not add any voltage untill it's needed so the first part of the overclock is to raise the multiplier and test untill it won't run and then you add a bit of voltage to get it to run and be stable then you raise the multiplier and test untill it won't run and add voltage again. You want to look at the voltage part of the overclock as thrying to see how little voltage you can add to still have it running, kind of like a competition and the winner is the person with the lowest voltage. So as you raise the multiplier and test you want to keep doing that till you have to add voltage.
m
0
l
a c 99 à CPUs
a c 231 K Overclocking
September 22, 2012 8:57:04 PM

nickybh said:
Hello,

I'm totally noob with OC but I have attempted to get my i7 2700k to reach 4.6 GHz. My first test was at 4.5 with Vcore at 1.4. Under Prime95 stress, one of the cores reached 87 degrees C. My cooler is a Corsair H60 and my case breathes very well. I stopped the test when I saw the 87 and now I have doubts about my system reaching 4.6, which seems to be achievable for most systems.

My question is more about the Vcore. I know that Vcore should vary with multiplier but 1.4 seems very conservative. That's just where I started.

Should I attempt to lower it to bring down the temps? If so, what is a good voltage to aim for?
What is a safe incremental drop to test with, i.e. should i go from 1.4 to 1.38 or 1.39 etc?

Here are my system specs:

Asus P8P67 EVO
i7 2700K
Geil EVO Corsa 16GB 1333MHz 9.9.9.24
Corsair H60
Radeon HD6950

Thanks everyone


No Offense!

You are completely clueless as to how to overclock, you don't even know where to start, that's what the guides are for, to walk you through overclocking!

A 2700K does not need 1.4v to run 4.5ghz, I suggest you read up on what you're doing, and then do it, before your next post is crying and whining about did I burn up my CPU!
m
0
l
!