Intel SRT Question

Hi Guys,
I've just ordered a Gigabyte Z86 UD5 B3 for my Intel switch-over from AMD. I'm interested in getting an SSD for use with Intel's SRT feature. I'm looking at getting the OCZ Agility 3 60GB SSD. My question is, in which ways can you use SRT? I'm thinking of having Windows 7 installed on the SSD (with one partition), my data on my accelerated 500GB HDD and the remaining space on the SSD (Around 35GB) on the other partition used as cache. Is this possible?

Please suggest anything you think/know would work better.

Thanks,
Tristan
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  1. In my opinion:

    Not really possible. SRT was introduced to make small SSDs, too small for the OS to be installed, useful. They cache the most-frequently used files, which are almost always your OS files.

    So if you have an SSD for the OS and an SRT SSD, the SRT drive will cache the OS SSD. Which is pretty useless.

    If you can really squeeze your OS down to 25 GB, put the 35 GB worth of data that you need fast access to on the rest of the drive.

    EDIT: I think that SRT eats the entire drive, not a partition, but I'm looking this up now. If I'm correct, then not only would what you describe not be productive, it would not work. ... Looks like it's whole-drive.
  2. It's been a while since someone has asked about Intel Smart Response technology. Here is my standard answer:

    Intel's SRT caching technology was designed for buyers who could not justify or afford the cost of a larger capacity solid-state drive. According to Intel, the original idea was that for about $100.00 a user could purchase a small capacity ssd of about 10 to 20GB and use it as a cache to improve hard disk drive performance. The Operating system and programs were actually stored on a hard disk drive. The actual improvement could not compare to a stand alone ssd. Intel also looked at different capacities all the way up to 512GB and concluded 64GB was the point of diminishing return. It made more sense to use a 64GB ssd as a boot drive that also contained software programs. Intel was hoping that if business clients saw an increase in performance, then they would be induced to purchase larger capacity ssd's that promised an even greater boost in performance.

    A lot has changed sinced then, especially prices. For $100.00 you can definitely purchase an ssd that is much larger than 20GB. Might as well take full advantage of ssd performance.
  3. Okay, thanks guys. I think I'll be buying an SSD anyway so I'll give it a try as I'll have a fresh installation of windows that I don't mind playing around with :)
  4. tjcoops said:
    Okay, thanks guys. I think I'll be buying an SSD anyway so I'll give it a try as I'll have a fresh installation of windows that I don't mind playing around with :)


    Ok, but seriously, install the OS directly on the SSD and don't even bother with SRT. It offers worse performance than a discrete SSD, therefor why bother even trying it?
  5. But I can't afford anything more than a 64GB SSD and I don't just want a few programs/games to benefit whilst the rest of my data is at it's usual slow pace.
  6. What is your budget for a new ssd?

    What do you do with your pc?

    Are you in the United States or another country?

    The best bang for the buck is an ssd with Microsoft Windows, applications, utilities, and two of your most favorite games. All data files, folders, less favorite games, movies, music, backups, and other stuff are stored on a hard disk drive. It is the most common configuration we see and the one recommended by Tom's Hardware until ssd prices go down.
  7. I saw the OCZ Agility 3 60gb for ₤68, it seems to have good specs for the price. I wouldn't want to go much higher than that for an ssd, ₤75 at the Max really. I play games, do a bit of photo editing/manipulation, some video editing and a small amount of word processing as well as listen to music and videos. so a bbit of everything really.

    That's why Intel's SRT appealed to me, as it changes/learns what it caches to what you use, but it sounds like its not as ideal as I thought.

    I'm in the UK, everything seems a bit more expensive over here :P
  8. I am a little new to these SSDs myself but was wondering the same sort of thing as the OP.
    This is my disk setup
    1 X 120Gb OCZ Vertex 3
    2 X Spinners set in RAID 0
    Firstly I installed a copy of windows 7 on a spare disk I had lying around.
    I installed the drivers and Intel's IRST.
    Once I did that I chose the accelerate option to accelerate data from the RAID array to a 19Gb cache partition on the Vertex.
    I left the rest of the Vertex empty.
    I then disconnected the spare drive and began a normal windows 7 install on the empty space left on the SSD.
    After doing doing that I installed IRST and was able to access the Accelerate button and could see that the RAID array was indeed accelerated.
    So all seems good.
    My only concern is that in order for this to work the software has created a software RAID with the SSD and, if I'm not mistaken, TRIM is not supported on RAID members?
    Do I need to be concerned or does the GC algorithm of the SF controller sort this?
    Thanks.
    Mac.
  9. ^ You are correct, trim is not supportted when the SSD is a member drive of a raid0 setup - DON't think you can have trim for half a drive - LOL. Personnaly, I prefer to have trim functioning INADDITTION to CG, And Yes (a) CG does work, just not as well when Trim is also functioning and (B) Yes the CG in the SF22xx controller based SSD is better than Marvel/Sansung Based SSD - But I still PREFER the M4 or Samsung 830 over the SF22xx based SSD.

    Normally don't recommend SRT
    On the 60 gig Agility III, You can try it as SRT drive, just use all of it. Depending on your usage it may turn out OK - As stated your usage vs How well the algortum Guesses your next move. Your games could be "bump" from the cache, or may be in the cache

    Then when you can afford a 2nd on, then stick your OS + programs on it and use the 2nd one to install your games to - Don't use raid0

    PS my tirad - Have 2 120 Gig Agility IIIs, The only way I'll own another one is if it is a freebee and I'll stick it in a enclosure and use it like a thumbdrive. All ready replace one with the Samsung 830. NOTE one for benchmarks, but it score just over half of what my M4 (in notebook) and my Samsung 830 score (AS SSD).
    Must also state, in real life you will not se much diff
  10. Thanks for the reply RetiredChief.
    I was trying to help the OP out as he asked if he could use the one drive for windows install and SRT.
    While I was at it I had those couple of questions which you answered for me so thanks.
    With respect to TRIM being disabled but GC working, do you think there will be any long term detrimental affects?
    Thanks.
  11. In my mind, UNK and only time will tell.
    CG should be OK, Primary reason for Developing TRIM is that there is still a large segment that are not windows 7. Unless the manuf do not want to see a rash of 2 1/2 yr RMAs I would think that they would build in so that the units at least last longer than the Warrantee.
  12. machasm said:
    Firstly I installed a copy of windows 7 on a spare disk I had lying around.
    I installed the drivers and Intel's IRST.
    Once I did that I chose the accelerate option to accelerate data from the RAID array to a 19Gb cache partition on the Vertex.
    I left the rest of the Vertex empty.
    I then disconnected the spare drive and began a normal windows 7 install on the empty space left on the SSD.
    After doing doing that I installed IRST and was able to access the Accelerate button and could see that the RAID array was indeed accelerated.

    And you have given an excellent answer to my questions about whether you can use SRT on a partition. Many thanks.
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