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What does the voltage for DDR3 memory mean on newegg's site

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  • Memory
  • DDR3
  • Product
Last response: in Memory
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September 2, 2010 11:00:56 PM

I tried searching for the answer, but haven't had any luck.

On newegg, each memory lists a voltage. For example, here's a search for some
DDR3 4GB(2x2) kits and the Voltage is specified as anywhere from 1.35V to 1.9V (most are 1.65V). I thought I read that DDR3 memory had to be 1.65V or less to avoid damaging the CPU.

What does that voltage represent? Is it the maximum voltage that can be applied? Is it the minimum voltage required to meet the timing specified?

Will 1.65V memory run at lower voltages?
Will 1.35V memory run at higher voltages?

Is lower/higher voltage memory better for OC'ing (i.e. will it operate at better timings if given more/less voltage)?

Thanks

More about : voltage ddr3 memory newegg site

a b } Memory
September 2, 2010 11:26:30 PM

For Intel i-series chips the RAM voltage is not recommended to be higher than 1.65, as damage may result. Typically, the specs you see on Newegg are "advertised" specs. Advertised specs are what the manufacturer recommends for that particular kit.

When it comes to overclocking, generally, you'll have to volt higher than stock to achieve the overclocked speeds/frequencies. So, this means that stock, the RAM modules could be 1.3, but at OC values, they should be 1.65.

So, to answer your questions...

What does that voltage represent? Advertised specifications

Is it the maximum voltage that can be applied? Most of the time, yes.

Is it the minimum voltage required to meet the timing specified? No. The minimum value is never advertised, and the timing specs are a separate issue.

Will 1.65V memory run at lower voltages? Yes.

Will 1.35V memory run at higher voltages? yes.

Is lower/higher voltage memory better for OC'ing (i.e. will it operate at better timings if given more/less voltage)? In order to overclock, you'll have to raise your voltage. To reach higher performance levels, more power is needed.

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September 2, 2010 11:47:46 PM

T_T said:
When it comes to overclocking, generally, you'll have to volt higher than stock to achieve the overclocked speeds/frequencies. So, this means that stock, the RAM modules could be 1.3, but at OC values, they should be 1.65.

So, when you say "stock" what are you referring to? Is that what the MB sets the RAM voltage to by default?
Quote:
Is it the maximum voltage that can be applied? Most of the time, yes.
...
In order to overclock, you'll have to raise your voltage. To reach higher performance levels, more power is needed.

I take that as meaning higher voltage is better.

Or more specifically, the G.Skill Ripjaws at 1.65V 7-8-7-24-2N would be better than the
G.Skill Eco at 1.35V 7-8-7-24-2N
Is that correct?
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a b } Memory
September 2, 2010 11:59:04 PM

Yes, "stock" refers to the mb setting; or [Auto]. The reason for the [Auto] setting is to allow the use of almost any RAM, within the physical limitations, of course. On [Auto], the mobo doesn't just detect what voltage to set the RAM modules to, but also allows the voltage to fluctuate as more voltage is needed.

The reason you want to specifiy to the mobo, how much voltage to use when OC-ing, is so that you don't go below the set value. Know that just because the "advertised" specification may be 1.65v, that doesn't mean you absolutely need to run your RAM at that voltage. Overclocking requires patience and fine tuning.

As for which RAM is better, that all depends on whether you plan to OC or not. The 1.35v RAM is for builds that are more "green", or environmentally conscious. The 1.35v indicates the optimal performance voltage. In theory, this RAM is supposed to do what the 1.65v does, but with less energy impact.

Tom's Hardware did an article on the performance difference between eco modules and regular modules, the results were close, but the regular modules still out-performed the eco modules.
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