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Overclock my first Build? I'd like too but...

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October 12, 2012 2:58:46 PM

Hey !

Last week I built my first PC (I'm a gamer). I wanted to do a build for a while, I just never had the opportunity given my job with the military! But that's over now, so I'd like get a grasp on PC building and Overclocking.

I managed to assemble the following, and it runs amazing(well compared to what I had anyways!) I built it with overclocking in mind, hopefully I went in the right direction! If you have any input on this build , let me know also lol, it could help in the future!

CPU- Intel Core i7-3770K (3.9Ghz Turbo)
H100 Liquid CPU cooler
Mobo- ASUS P8Z77- V PRO
GPU- MSI N680GTX LIGHTNING GEFORCE 2GB
PSU- CORSAIR AX1200i 1200w
Mem- CORSAIR Vengeance 16G (4X4GB)
SSD- Intel 330 series 240GB
HDD- 1 TB WD Black Caviar
Opt Drv- ASUS...
OS- Win7 64Bit
Case- CORSAIR 650D

I have a few questions about Overclocking this system.

I'm curious wether or not I'd actually noticed a difference in performance with games like GW2 or BF3?

I've been researching the basics of overclocking but I keep getting thrown a loop with my own system. I have these options, things that seem like an auto overclock of some sort. haha leave me alone im learning!
Heres whats troubling me!
My CPU has a Turbo Boost (to 3.9GHZ), which is default on, but I think it only applies only to one core until it needs to utilize another? There is an option to change from default to manual, to then adjust each core(1-4). So is this overclocking my CPU lol? Meaning Id need to change my voltages etc? Do you want to have all cores working together , equally , share the load?

Also on my Mobo's UEFI mode you can access a feature called performance select. You can chose between power saving, normal and asus optimum modes. For the life of me I cant find what settings these features actually change. I did notice my cpu jumped up above 4 ghz when optimum was enabled. So is this overclocking? lol is it safe?

With the h100 , I plugged all fans into its control unit on the cpu(x2 120mm rad intake fans, 200mm front intake, 120mm out,) I also added a 200mm fan to the bottom of my case. With over clocking , would I want to max out all fans, auto set them, or chose a value?

I know my question's are all over the place but any input, on any of the topics lol , would be greatly appreciated! If you want me to read a suggested overclocking guide or whatever I'll dive right into it! This stuff has my head spinning, its super confusing but at the same time very interesting and I'm enjoying it!

Thanks in advance!
have a great day

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a b K Overclocking
October 12, 2012 4:56:49 PM

Here, read this: http://www.overclock.net/t/1247413/ivy-bridge-overclock...

Motherboards usually have auto-overclocking features. Since you are very interested in OCing, then don't use them and take the time to learn what's going on so you can get the most out of your overclock by using manual settings. Also, don't just use some guy-on-the-web's multiplier and voltage settings, do it right by increasing the multiplier on your own chip 1 tick at a time, test for stability and then increase voltage very slowly as needed to maintain stability. I use Intel Burn Test as a 'quick test', prime95 as a long test, and then games as a real-world test.

You can run your fans at different speeds during stability testing to see if it makes any difference in temperatures. Only you can measure what's too loud vs. too high temp. So do some experimentation with different settings.

Whether or not you need the overclock depends on you and your computer usage. If you are just gaming and surfing, you probably aren't going to see any differences, a couple frames here or there isn't necessarily going to be perceptible. The 3770k at stock is generally more than enough CPU for gaming.

Most people who overclock, find their maximum (usually limited by temperature) and also find a sweet spot somewhere in there where temps and voltage are reasonably low and clocks are good. Then they compare their performance with the machine at stock and OCed. If you perceive a difference that is worth the lowered potential longevity of your chip then great. If not, just run at stock while saving those OC settings for possible need in the future.

Example: my three-year-old i7-920 is stock-clocked at 2.66ghz, it maxes at 4.1ghz (icky-high temps) but I run it 24/7 at 3.5ghz because I can perceive a pretty big difference in performance. My 3770k (portable machine) runs at stock unless I want to show it off running at 4.5ghz because it really makes little difference in the handful of apps and the occasional games that I run with it.
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October 12, 2012 5:55:20 PM

Hey larkspur!

Thanks allot for the information! Your right, I don't really think the games I play are demanding enough to see a change from OCing. Not yet anyways. Playing games like GW2 I get amazing FPS with every setting maxed out so I really cant complain!

I'm going to read over the form you linked, and many others for sure. Then when the time comes i'll hopefully have the knowledge to give my PC a solid boost !
I don't intend on just grabbing values off the web and I'd like to have an understanding like you mentioned , before I start potentially melting my money away!
Thanks again!
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December 14, 2012 12:29:55 PM

Best answer selected by Throshinn.
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