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Which Memory?

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Last response: in Memory
September 13, 2010 4:59:41 AM

I am putting together a computer for my first build. I want to build mostly a gamming computer, but will use it for other stuff...Movies and H.T.M.L. programming. (etcetera)
So far I have gotten a Cooler Master GX RX650 Power supply, And an AZZA Solano 1000R Case, The CPU is in Intel Core 2 duo E8500, And the Motherboard I got is a Gigabyte
GA-EP45T-USB3. Next I will be Getting the memory, I want to put the fastest in I can, But I am not really sure what my limitations are...My CPU FSB is 1333. My motherboard Memory standard is DDR3 2200(oc)/1333/1066/800 So which is the fastest I can get? Also I was reading about the Intel p45 chipset and it said something about it being only capable of handling 1066...So which is it? Any Advice would be appreciated. I was going to get 4 gigs to start with, and my budget is about 125$

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a b } Memory
September 13, 2010 5:41:13 AM

Use this 1333 set:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820146748

and put the money you save toward a better psu. Couldn't find a review of trhe 650W, but here's a review of its 750W brandmate:

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Cooler-Master-GX-750-W-Power-Supply-Review/917/10

Don't know what your real power requirements are, but a 650W Seasonic unit at Newegg is about $80. Depending on your gpu choice, you may not even need that much.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151091&cm_re=seasonic_650-_-17-151-091-_-Product
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September 13, 2010 6:07:21 AM

Twoboxer said:
Use this 1333 set:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820146748

and put the money you save toward a better psu. Couldn't find a review of trhe 650W, but here's a review of its 750W brandmate:

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Cooler-Master-GX-750-W-Power-Supply-Review/917/10

Don't know what your real power requirements are, but a 650W Seasonic unit at Newegg is about $80. Depending on your gpu choice, you may not even need that much.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151091&cm_re=seasonic_650-_-17-151-091-_-Product

Thanks for the info. On the munskin memory which cas latency is best for gamming? 9-9-9-24? or 7-7-7-21? or does it matter? and I already got the psu, the graphics card I like (ati 5770) says 450w or 600 for crossfire so i figure 650w should be sufficient.
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a b } Memory
September 13, 2010 6:59:55 AM

CL7 (ie, the 7-7-7-21) is "better", but it won't make any noticable difference gaming.

I hope you read the review of the psu. It is not favorable.

"Cooler Master GX 750 W looks like a good option for users looking for a mainstream 750 W power supply, however it has a major flaw that prevents us from recommending it: noise level at +3.3 V and +5VSB outputs were above the maximum allowed when we pulled 600 W and above from this unit. High noise levels overload and can even damage components on your computer."

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September 13, 2010 1:41:32 PM

Twoboxer said:
CL7 (ie, the 7-7-7-21) is "better", but it won't make any noticable difference gaming.

I hope you read the review of the psu. It is not favorable.

"Cooler Master GX 750 W looks like a good option for users looking for a mainstream 750 W power supply, however it has a major flaw that prevents us from recommending it: noise level at +3.3 V and +5VSB outputs were above the maximum allowed when we pulled 600 W and above from this unit. High noise levels overload and can even damage components on your computer."

Yes I read it, wish I would of known about the noise issue prior to my ordering the unit. But I cant send it back now. I ordered it over 2 months ago. This is my very first venture into computer components and computer building. I am teaching myself, through online research and am going to attempt the actual build after I accumulate all the parts. I appreciate any advice...so, thank you. Theoretically, what parts of your computer can be damaged by the noise issue?
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Best solution

a b } Memory
September 13, 2010 7:20:04 PM

Practically speaking, anything electrically powered.

The good news is you will not draw anywhere close to enough power to put this psu into its reported "danger zone" using the vid cards and other parts you will choose. And of course we're assuming the 650W has the same flaw found in the 750W. (Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if they are essentially identical with different labelling.)

So don't worry about it for now, but remember next time to select the psu with care. PSU failure is the cause of more than 50% of the hardware related problems resolved here.

Back to your memory choice - a reliable brand with "adequate" specs turns out to be the best use of money, unless you're overclocking . . . competing in benchmarking . . . or the price difference is very small. Because faster speeds do not translate into noticably faster gaming or application performance.

What screen are you going to use? What resolution will you game at? That will determine your vid card choice. How much disk space do you need? Whether you plan to buy them now or later, no reason we can't suggest a couple of good parts now.
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September 20, 2010 1:34:53 AM

Best answer selected by deserthermit.
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September 20, 2010 1:50:06 AM

Twoboxer said:
Practically speaking, anything electrically powered.

The good news is you will not draw anywhere close to enough power to put this psu into its reported "danger zone" using the vid cards and other parts you will choose. And of course we're assuming the 650W has the same flaw found in the 750W. (Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if they are essentially identical with different labelling.)

So don't worry about it for now, but remember next time to select the psu with care. PSU failure is the cause of more than 50% of the hardware related problems resolved here.

Back to your memory choice - a reliable brand with "adequate" specs turns out to be the best use of money, unless you're overclocking . . . competing in benchmarking . . . or the price difference is very small. Because faster speeds do not translate into noticably faster gaming or application performance.

What screen are you going to use? What resolution will you game at? That will determine your vid card choice. How much disk space do you need? Whether you plan to buy them now or later, no reason we can't suggest a couple of good parts now.

I just realized you replied....Thank you for the info. Havent done much research into resolution or disk space, I was basically making it up as I went. The Screen makes a differance? Like I said I am green at computers and computer building...It is just something that I am interested in and I thought I would give it a try. I have a 19 inch flatscreen. The graphics card That I like is a Sappire Radeon 5750, or the 5770. I would be getting one at first then later after my funds permit, I would get another for the crossfirex. As far as getting the parts I save up and my budget allows about 100$ a month, I have been working on getting the parts I have so far for a little over 4 months. So I am in no hurry. I appriciate your help so far. Glad to hear that you think I should be O.K. on the psu. I looked at the memory and the memory you suggested is on the memory support list, on the gigabyte website, so I think I will go for it..T.Y.
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a b } Memory
September 20, 2010 2:17:09 AM

The screen and resolution you will use determines how much cpu and gpu power you need to play a game rather than watch a slide show.

FPS (frames per second) has to be above 30 to provide smooth motion. The larger the screen, the more pixels to fill it, the more cpu to generate them, and the more gpu to display them.

A 19" flatscreen can have a native resolution like 1280x1024 or 1440x900. Those are well within the ability of a 5750.
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September 20, 2010 2:42:24 AM

Twoboxer said:
The screen and resolution you will use determines how much cpu and gpu power you need to play a game rather than watch a slide show.

FPS (frames per second) has to be above 30 to provide smooth motion. The larger the screen, the more pixels to fill it, the more cpu to generate them, and the more gpu to display them.

A 19" flatscreen can have a native resolution like 1280x1024 or 1440x900. Those are well within the ability of a 5750.

O.k. Twoboxer..Thanks for the info. Next time I have a quesion or need advice, before ordering my next part, I think I will write you and find out what you think prior to making a decision...Thank you again.
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