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More than 255 Computers In My Network

Tags:
  • LAN
  • Windows Server 2003
  • Computers
  • Servers
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
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January 11, 2010 9:45:12 PM

Hi there.

im an I.T technician working at my local school. the network has 190 computers currently.

I use windows server 2003, and the network has all the normal servers e.g. File server, admin server, print server.

the DHCP server sends IP's out as soon as machine's are turnt on like they do, talk of another 200 computer to the network has arised recently. :o 

with the 255.255.255.0 subnet mask in my network im only allowed 254 computers right? how can i add another 200 computers to the network with this. Please help me someone im really unsure on what to do when the extra 200 PC's come.

my current IP range is from

192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.254

my subnet is

255.255.255.0

Thanks for any help guys, its really appreciated.

More about : 255 computers network

January 11, 2010 11:28:37 PM

Add another NIC and configure DHCP accordingly. You could add network 192.168.1.0/24 which will allow for an additional 253 hosts. The server can act as a router between both networks.
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January 11, 2010 11:34:27 PM

if you could set your subnet to 255.255.0.0 then you could talk with any IP in the 192.168.x.x range.
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January 12, 2010 10:54:57 AM

If your network hardware will support it you could also setup vlans.
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January 12, 2010 2:40:12 PM

or use a 10.x.x.x dhcp address and a 255.255.255.0 subnet
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January 12, 2010 6:35:31 PM

kewl's suggestion would probably be an easy solution. Most of the time, the 192.168.x.x range is used inhome networks.. but 192.168 w\ the 255.255 subnet gives you a maximum of 65,000+ ip addresses to use.

There's really no need to nit-pick and break it down closer... you could also do 192.168.0.0 255.255.254, Which would give you 510 usable ip addresses. or 255.255.252 which would give you 1024 ip's.. but you don't have to worry about conserving ip's since they're private addresses.

You may need to make some changes to your network devices when making this change of ip addresses.

I worked at the community college I was attending, and believe it or not.... they didn't utilize NAT ! Every computer on campus had a unique public ip address. This was the topic of discussion all the time in classes I was taking.
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January 12, 2010 6:57:29 PM

Part of the reason I suggested just changing the subnet is then you don't have to worry about routing.

change of subnet would be the easiest and transparent change when working with no routers and everyone on the same broadcast domain.
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January 13, 2010 4:01:42 PM

Kewlx25 said:
Part of the reason I suggested just changing the subnet is then you don't have to worry about routing.

change of subnet would be the easiest and transparent change when working with no routers and everyone on the same broadcast domain.



thanks mate as said i think your solution would probably be the easiest. could you emphasize a bit more on the first part where you said changing the subnet means you dont have to worry about routing.

if you could that would be great, cheers.

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