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Re-using an HP uATX case for new build - posible?

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February 8, 2010 1:20:45 PM

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: Whenever I get the cash saved up... lol up to 6 months from now.

BUDGET RANGE: $500 before rebates if possible, still looking over my options for parts.

SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: Tinkering! (Dual-boot OS project, hacking my enV Touch, Wii and anything else I can mess with :)  ), Internet, Home Finances/business computing, Home Server (I love this idea), Gaming

PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Keyboard, Mouse, Speakers, Monitor, Optical drive, Floppy drive, OS.

PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: www.newegg.com

PARTS PREFERENCES:
uATX form factor
Intel E5200 Pentium dual-core for brains
DDR3 RAM
On-board graphics and option to use outboard accelerator card.

OVERCLOCKING: Maybe, I'm a bit leery of that stuff, seeing how I tend to sometimes make things brick, but I'd like to try it. Like I said, I tinker with everything i can.

MONITOR RESOLUTION: the one I have now is the old CRT that came with the system at 1024x768, but the option to upgrade would be good later.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: I'd like to have a solid, functional base system to start with and play around with upgrades as I have the cash. - - See below - -

I had an old HP system handed down to me, an XT914.
I accidentally bricked it by putting too much force on the MoBo while trying to "Frankenstien" together multiple parts from multiple PCs, broke off a capacitor. ( :pfff:  stupid N003 mistake, I know).


Either that or I had the wrong RAM types installed... I'll monkey with that later tonight.

Either way, I want to build a non-dinosaur system inside it's case.

The XT914 has a uATX MoBo, so would it be possible for me to save $100 on a new case and reuse this one by buying an up-to-date uATX MoBo and components?

Again, just looking for a working base system. Not 100% sure what I'd need for base parts... I think HDD, RAM, MoBo, P/S, CPU & Cooler, in reverse order lol.
February 8, 2010 1:33:07 PM

You might could, though it's doubtful. But even if you could, wouldn't you be better off to invest in a good case that you can always use as a platform for building a new system, and have some space to work with, especially because of your seemingly accident prone frankenstein hands?
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February 8, 2010 1:41:13 PM

I see your point...

I think that was a case of " :o  I don't know my own strength!"

I guess I'll get this thing built on paper first.

Revising original post...

- LTC
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February 8, 2010 2:12:00 PM

Just make sure you buy components that fit under the psu wattage cap. Here's a power supply calculator:
http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

There's a 99% chance that the motherboard you purchase will work with your psu, but download its manual before purchase and double-check.

And, depending on the components you choose, you may need to buy adapters to convert psu connectors. For example, if the psu has molex connectors and no SATA power connectors, then you would need an adapter.
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Best solution

February 8, 2010 5:34:50 PM

The other thing to keep in mind when using old proprietary cases is the front panel connectors (power, reset, hd activity light, etc...). I actually tried this with an old Compaq case I have and the front panel connectors would not plug into my new motherboard and I'm not sure it's wise to run bare wires to those motherboard pins.

-Wolf sends
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February 15, 2010 1:54:30 PM

Best answer selected by luciusthecanine.
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