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New to PC water cooling

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November 4, 2012 2:37:10 AM

whats up guys!

I spent a lot of time reading and researching for my new upcoming PC upgrade with water cooling.

I will be using the Corsair 650D for my PC case water cooling built.

I finally received all my water cooling parts:

1 x Swiftech MCP655 Special Edition 12 VDC Pump With Speed Controller

1 x XSPC Raystorm CPU Waterblock - Intel

2 x PrimoChill ICE Non-Conductive Liquid Cooling Fluid (32 oz.) - UV Blue

10 feet PrimoFlex Pro LRT Clear Tubing -1/2in. ID X 3/4in. OD

1 x Bitspower Water Tank Z-Multi 150

1 x EK-CoolStream RAD XT (240)

2 x Enzotech 90 Degree Rotary Compression Fitting G 1/4 Thread - ID1/2 - OD3/4

6 x XSPC G1/4" to 1/2" ID, 3/4" OD Compression Fitting - Chrome Finish

and some other misc. parts too.



I will also going to upgrade my GTX560 ti to the new GTX670 and going full water block on my new GPU.
Do I really need to use one more additional radiator since I am gonna be doing two loops, one for CPU and one for the GPU.
Per above, I already have one 240 radiator, so just needed to know if I need a 120 or even better a 140 single radiator to add on my loop.


I read all the forums and just needed to know if someone could just help me out and point out to me what best is, one 240 rad or add one more rad for a two loop run.

thanks.




More about : water cooling

a c 168 K Overclocking
November 4, 2012 4:33:47 AM

From what I have heard and read online, it is better to go with a single loop than multiple.

To figure out how much radiator you need, you have to calculate the TDP of the components in the loop. Then compare that with the TDP the radiator/s can handle (check review sites, not official specs)
This is what the WC' sticky says about it.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-...
General rule of thumb is 120mm for every component in the loop, then 120mm if your overclocking. If you add more after that it allows for slower fans.

I assume you will be mounting the 240mm at the top of the case, the only other radiator you could put in (assuming you want to keep the drive cages) is a 120mm.
Or you could get tricky and mount a radiator externally.
November 4, 2012 6:40:31 AM

manofchalk said:
From what I have heard and read online, it is better to go with a single loop than multiple.

To figure out how much radiator you need, you have to calculate the TDP of the components in the loop. Then compare that with the TDP the radiator/s can handle (check review sites, not official specs)
This is what the WC' sticky says about it.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-...
General rule of thumb is 120mm for every component in the loop, then 120mm if your overclocking. If you add more after that it allows for slower fans.

I assume you will be mounting the 240mm at the top of the case, the only other radiator you could put in (assuming you want to keep the drive cages) is a 120mm.
Or you could get tricky and mount a radiator externally.



Thanks !!

correct, i will have my 240 Rad installed on top
I believe you are correct, I will be only needing one Rad which is the 240.
I will be doing my loop connection as follow:

Reservoir to Pump
Pump to Radiator IN
Radiator OUT to i7 2600k
i7 2600k to GTX 670
GTX 670 to Reservoir
Related resources
a c 168 K Overclocking
November 4, 2012 6:46:24 AM

The loop order doesn't have any large impact to cooling performance, just use whichever config will look the neatest.
One exception is the pump and res, put those next to each other so the pump doesn't run dry when first setting up the loop.
a c 190 K Overclocking
November 4, 2012 7:02:28 AM

If you are externally top mounting, go for a 360 rad, it gives you more headroom and a lower Delta T reading,
otherwise as Chalk said, the sticky is there to just fill in a few gaps for you, you seem to be on top of things so far though, just lose the coolant and use plain distilled water instead
Moto
November 4, 2012 7:35:34 AM

Motopsychojdn said:
If you are externally top mounting, go for a 360 rad, it gives you more headroom and a lower Delta T reading,
otherwise as Chalk said, the sticky is there to just fill in a few gaps for you, you seem to be on top of things so far though, just lose the coolant and use plain distilled water instead
Moto



thanks for your tip on using plain distilled water instead.

oh! I will have my Rad 240 installed inside on top of my new Corsair 650D.

I just want to confirm or need other info why not to use my coolant, I mean a bottle average for $15.99++ depending on the brand comparing to distilled water that anyone could pickup for .99 cents at Stater Bros.

is there something i need to know ? thanks so much for any other info.
a c 168 K Overclocking
November 4, 2012 7:47:53 AM

Pre-mixed coolant often has anti-microbial agents in them to prevent anything growing in the loop, as well as anti-corrosives and possibly dyes.
But all those extra chemicals can impact the thermal conductivity of the water, and corrosion isn't an issue with Distilled water. You will however have to get some anti-microbial/algae agent.
Most common (and what I use) is a little strip of Silver that's known as a Kill-Coil. Drop it in the reservoir and you'l be fine. Make sure to twist it into a shape that cant get out of the res and potentially into any blocks (or even worse) the pump.
The other common method is through the use of something like PT Nuke. Basically just a chemical that you add to the water that will kill any algae/bacteria. You will have to re-apply every time you expose the loop to air though.
Less common but not unusual is UV light. Setting up some UV cathodes in the rig will also do the same as the above methods (your tubing and res will need to be somewhat transparent).
November 4, 2012 8:19:41 AM

manofchalk said:
Pre-mixed coolant often has anti-microbial agents in them to prevent anything growing in the loop, as well as anti-corrosives and possibly dyes.
But all those extra chemicals can impact the thermal conductivity of the water, and corrosion isn't an issue with Distilled water. You will however have to get some anti-microbial/algae agent.
Most common (and what I use) is a little strip of Silver that's known as a Kill-Coil. Drop it in the reservoir and you'l be fine. Make sure to twist it into a shape that cant get out of the res and potentially into any blocks (or even worse) the pump.
The other common method is through the use of something like PT Nuke. Basically just a chemical that you add to the water that will kill any algae/bacteria. You will have to re-apply every time you expose the loop to air though.
Less common but not unusual is UV light. Setting up some UV cathodes in the rig will also do the same as the above methods (your tubing and res will need to be somewhat transparent).



thanks sooo much !!

as of now I am awaiting for my new GTX 670, GPU water blocks and few other extra fittings.
I am good to go and as far as using distilled water, yes, I will look into it.


thanks
November 4, 2012 8:22:30 AM

to Manofchalk:

I also wanted to point out from your statement as below:
" a little strip of Silver that's known as a Kill-Coil. Drop it in the reservoir and you'l be fine "

does it mean that I only need to buy distilled water and just add that piece of Kill-Coil and thats it ? no need to add anti-microbial/algae agen !

thanks
a c 190 K Overclocking
November 4, 2012 8:25:31 AM

+1, couple of UV Cathodes and killcoils keep my loop clear without any potentially cat unfriendly chemicals in the loop :) 
pure distilled has the best thermal transfer capacity, if you add gloop like anti-freeze etc in there it detracts from the cooling ability of the coolant/loop, small amounts only affect it negligibly, but I know of folks running 60/40 mixes and complaning that 'water cooling doesn't give me as good results as I'd like',
the coolant is often one of the main cuplrits as to underperforming loops, after flowrates, bad fan solutions and inadequate radspace
**Edit, to answer your post whilst I was typing, yes, plain distilled and a killcoil is sufficient to perform anti-gloop duties, I and others have UV in addition to that though, still no detraction of performance, or chemical risks**
Moto
a c 168 K Overclocking
November 4, 2012 8:27:24 AM

Yep, though you could run both if you wanted.
If you cant find a Kill-Coil on any water-cooling websites (there should be), you can go to any local jewelers store and just buy a ~15cm strip of .999% silver.
a c 324 K Overclocking
November 5, 2012 2:22:23 PM

You'd need that extra 120mm when adding the 670 to the mix, but if you are going to overclock either CPU or GPU, you might consider a 140mm or a 2x120.

No need to run dual loops on a CPU+single GPU setup- you'll get plenty of flow.
!