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Premiere pro rendering question

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 4, 2010 4:16:11 AM

I am looking to upgrade my pc and part of that upgrade is a video card. Currently I have a geforce 9600gt. My question is, do I really need to upgrade my vid card? I dont really do gaming on my pc as it is used for video rendering and editing. If I do game, the vid card I have now is great for what games I play.

I plan on upgrading to a:

xeon x3440 cpu

Crucial ballistix 6 gig memory (i like lights)

EVGA 1366 Intel ATX X58 SLI LE Intel Motherboard

So do I need to spend the money on a newer vid card? I dont know how much of a role a vid card plays in rendering or video editing plus I was looking at getting the geforce gtx 275 which is not cheap. So if I could keep my 9600gt that would be good.

Any thoughts?
a b U Graphics card
February 4, 2010 4:51:51 AM

smoove7 said:
I am looking to upgrade my pc and part of that upgrade is a video card. Currently I have a geforce 9600gt. My question is, do I really need to upgrade my vid card? I dont really do gaming on my pc as it is used for video rendering and editing. If I do game, the vid card I have now is great for what games I play.

I plan on upgrading to a:

xeon x3440 cpu

Crucial ballistix 6 gig memory (i like lights)

EVGA 1366 Intel ATX X58 SLI LE Intel Motherboard

So do I need to spend the money on a newer vid card? I dont know how much of a role a vid card plays in rendering or video editing plus I was looking at getting the geforce gtx 275 which is not cheap. So if I could keep my 9600gt that would be good.

Any thoughts?


As far as Premiere Pro (CS4 I believe) the only GPU acceleration goes with zooming, rotating or panning of videos/pictures (photoshop for pictures)

There really isn't a performance increase from using a better GPU then the one you have now. CS4 Adobe Premiere is native using CUDA technology, while AMD uses their own Premiere Plugin for AMD cards. Apart from antialiasing the card can do, and the smoother Zooming/Rotating/Panning there isnt much else.


For video rendering this is the priority list:
1. Software/CPU (Tie) i7-920 is a beast at rendering. Software is basically self explanatory. Use crappy software, you get what you pay for (or don't pay for in the case of free video editors)

2. RAM (6gbs+ recommended specially when dealing with HD content) 6gbs will do, however if your doing really heavy HD content, multiple jobs at a time the requirement can easily hit 8gb-12gbs. For example one of my companions from school tends to do 2-3 videos at at time because he multi tasks the workload into 3 different projects. One main, one video effects, and a third for more video effects. Once the video effects are done on a certain clip they are imported to the main clip. He's having to use 8gbs of ram fresh and clean during these tasks.

3. Hard Drive speed (1 SSD, or perhaps just 2 HDDs in Raid 0 will do. Make sure the 2 HDD's are the latest generation 500gb single platter HDDS. Or one decent SSD.

4. Depending on software, GPU can matter but for the most of the time it doesnt (Premiere Pro doesn't matter much)

I just hope CS5 finally offloads the rendering to the GPU for some serious speed boost.
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February 4, 2010 4:01:56 PM

Thank you for the awesome answer. I did check on the SSD and WOW do they hit you in the wallet from what I have seen.

Now even though I am seeing that they blow away even the Veloci raptor 10000rpm, would the Veloci be a good upgrade from my western digital 7200?

Or could I get a small ssd for rendering purposes only and then go back to my regular HDD when I get done rendering?

Only thing I can think of is to load win 7 onto the SSD and adobe premiere but IDK all the options.


Plus I see that you mentioned the i7-920 and I mentioned the xeon x3440, the reason I bring up the x3440 is the HT they both have and it is about 40 bucks cheaper.
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a b U Graphics card
February 4, 2010 5:04:08 PM

smoove7 said:
Thank you for the awesome answer. I did check on the SSD and WOW do they hit you in the wallet from what I have seen.

Now even though I am seeing that they blow away even the Veloci raptor 10000rpm, would the Veloci be a good upgrade from my western digital 7200?

Or could I get a small ssd for rendering purposes only and then go back to my regular HDD when I get done rendering?

Only thing I can think of is to load win 7 onto the SSD and adobe premiere but IDK all the options.


Plus I see that you mentioned the i7-920 and I mentioned the xeon x3440, the reason I bring up the x3440 is the HT they both have and it is about 40 bucks cheaper.


Yes but the i7-920 is superior for several reasons:
-You would not benefit from ECC ram as much as you would benefit from faster ram such as DDR3 1600 that the Xeon is officially supporting like the i7-920.
-Also the QPI (replacement for hypertransport) on the i7-920 ranks at 4.5GT/s vs the Xeon at 2.5GT/s. This allows for superior communication to the I/O hub. Using QPI it allows for each of the virtual processors to access or communicate data from all components in the motherboard (RAM/GPU/etc) simultaneously to boost efficiency.
-Allows for 1600 mhz ram, Xeon only officially supports 1333 mhz.
- Supports higher memory bandwidths up to 25 gbs vs 20gbs

As I have said Raiding two hard drives (500gb single platters) will also give you a substantial boost.
A velocirapter is not a very good investment as many HDD's today can easily beat it in a simple raid 0 configuration.

You can get 2x Samsung Spinpoints F3 and raid them in RAID 0. This will increase reads/write to well over a velociraptor and will give you almost the same performance as a single SSD.
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February 4, 2010 7:34:27 PM

TY very much and that is a great idea to use RAID when building this new system. I have seen that setting up raid is different with win 7 (something about dynamic links) but I will do more research. Do you happen to know of any good links I could look at to tell me how to properly setup raid on win 7 home premium?



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