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How much power do I need for my new build?

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April 20, 2010 8:54:35 AM

I'm planning on building up a new PC, and I was wondering about the wattage needed for it... I've been to many websites that asks you to enter your PC components and it calculates the power needed for them, but it's not that accurate and I'm looking for some real-life opinions from you guys:

Here are the details of my new build:

Case: Thermaltake Element V
Power Supply Unit: Thermaltake (?)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R
Memory: Corsair 8GB DDR3 1333MHz
Processor Cooler: Thermaltake Frio
Video Card: XFX Radeon 5870 (+ another one in the near future)
Harddrive: 1TB 7200 rpm
Optical Drive: DVD-RW Drive
Wireless Microsoft Keyboard & Mouse

I'm planning on buying many of Thermaltake products, because I'm currently living in the middle east, and this is the only respectable brand with a certified dealer in here.

So tell me guys; how much power do I need? 750W? 850W? or less than that?

More about : power build

April 20, 2010 9:05:02 AM

750W should work pretty good however I think maybe 850W might be better.

I noticed you have 8 GB of RAM, X58 uses triple channel memory so you buy the 6GB kits not 4 or 8GB. Otherwise you will be in dual channel mode not triple.

Hope I helped.
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April 20, 2010 9:22:11 AM

Wolygon said:
750W should work pretty good however I think maybe 850W might be better.

I noticed you have 8 GB of RAM, X58 uses triple channel memory so you buy the 6GB kits not 4 or 8GB. Otherwise you will be in dual channel mode not triple.

Hope I helped.


Thanks a lot for the reply, but will you please explain more to me about the memory? I'm planning on buying two of (2x2GB) Corsair memory; hence the 8GB DDR3.
Should I buy 1 pack of (3x2GB) memory instead then? or what?
I'm sorry, but this is going to be the first PC that I'm going to build, and I don't want anything to go wrong.
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April 20, 2010 9:47:29 AM

Yes you should get a pack of 3X2GB those kits are for X58. To run memory in Triple Channel you require 3 one in each color, same as with Dual Channel but with 2. If you don't you won't be running the memory in Triple Channel, but obviously it still works.

I was also wondering why you were going to get more than 4GB of RAM, I was just making sure you know that more than 4 or 6GB is not required for gaming, so you are not just gaming then? Or were you just not sure.

Thanks.
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April 20, 2010 9:54:05 AM

In real world apps there's very little difference between dual-channel and triple-channel mainly due to the latter's higher latency:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/Intel-Core-i7-Nehal...

4GB, 6GB, or 8GB: just get as much RAM as you need.

On the PSU, you really only need about 600-700w(depends on CPU overclock) but if you're limited to Thermaltake, I'd get the Toughpower XT775 which uses Channel Well's new DSG platform:
http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/04/13/thermaltake_t...
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April 20, 2010 10:01:30 AM

Wolygon said:
Yes you should get a pack of 3X2GB those kits are for X58. To run memory in Triple Channel you require 3 one in each color, same as with Dual Channel but with 2. If you don't you won't be running the memory in Triple Channel, but obviously it still works.

I was also wondering why you were going to get more than 4GB of RAM, I was just making sure you know that more than 4 or 6GB is not required for gaming, so you are not just gaming then? Or were you just not sure.

Thanks.


Thanks again. I'm going to spend as much as I can on this new PC because I'm not going to upgrade it for a year or so (That's why I want to stack as much RAM sticks as I can).
And back to my question about the Triple channel memory, the Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R comes with 6 memory slots, so I should stick 3 memory sticks in 3
specific colored slots to attain the triple channel speed (I get it now), but what about future upgrades? what if I wanted to stick another 3 sticks (same memory and bandwidth) in the remaining slots? will they work as triple channel or dual?

Or are these specific colored slots are triple channel only?
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April 20, 2010 10:09:00 AM

logan the huge said:
In real world apps there's very little difference between dual-channel and triple-channel mainly due to the latter's higher latency:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/Intel-Core-i7-Nehal...

4GB, 6GB, or 8GB: just get as much RAM as you need.

On the PSU, you really only need about 600-700w(depends on CPU overclock) but if you're limited to Thermaltake, I'd get the Toughpower XT775 which uses Channel Well's new DSG platform:
http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/04/13/thermaltake_t...


Thanks Logan. I remember reading an article a bout a year ago that made comparisons between DDR2 and DDR3 memory; I don't remember the details, but what I remember clearly is that the conclusion of the article stated that the more memory, the better. It does not matter whether they're DDR2, 3 or even 4. The more RAM you got, the more faster your PC will become.

Is this still true in 2010? or was that theory a thing of the past?
And should I buy 8GB of DDR3 RAM in dual channel or bother with 6DD3 in triple?
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April 20, 2010 10:47:45 AM

To answer your question first, you are able to upgrade by adding 3 sticks and still run in Triple Channel.

Logan has said that Triple Channel Memory is no faster than Dual Channel despite this being true, it is advisable to go with Triple Channel when going with X58.

No new sockets support DDR2 so even if it was just as good you still can't use it, this is mainly because it is two slow in MHz, also now it is very expensive then compared to before.

The more RAM you have is not necessarily the better, latency maters and so does speed. Considering that you will not get more gaming performance past 4 or 6GB you should not get 8GB of RAM as it is not required.
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April 20, 2010 11:01:33 AM

^ Yeah, unless you're using a lot of memory intensive apps (HD video production, 3d rendering and the like) there's really no need for 8Gb of ram. 6Gb is more than enough for gaming and heavy multitasking. Since RAM is one of the easiest things to upgrade it doesn't make much sense to pay for more than you really need (price fluctuations not withstanding).
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April 20, 2010 9:33:39 PM

you still need 3 sticks (triple channel) otherwise you can damage your cpu.
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April 20, 2010 11:02:08 PM

keytthom said:
you still need 3 sticks (triple channel) otherwise you can damage your cpu.

I guess we're just supposed to take your word for it. :sarcastic: 

Seriously, educate yourself and stop spreading FUD.
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April 20, 2010 11:33:03 PM

keytthom said:
you still need 3 sticks (triple channel) otherwise you can damage your cpu.



Bogus.

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