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AMD A8 3850/ Blackbone case Corsair H60

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November 11, 2012 9:14:21 PM

Hey guys. Im currently getting 68 celcius when playing bf3 on my cpu.
I believe I need a better heatsink or water cooler.

Whats your opinion on this h60?
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1683...

Or should I simply go with a 212 EVO?
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1683...


Which of the two will get me better results in temperature?

Thanks for the help

EDIT: Also, what about this H70? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Best solution

a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 10:23:54 PM

I have an H60. buy the 212.

these small "Water Coolers" get totally saturated with heat ( the radiator/the lines/the pump, etc. ). the case stays filled with hot air because of this. They are junk!
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a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 11:49:23 PM

I have to agree if you goina go one of theses (standalone) cpu water coolers get the H100 or don't bother.
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November 12, 2012 6:23:40 PM

Best answer selected by PresidentSwag.
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November 13, 2012 9:51:16 AM

I got the Coolermaster hyper 212. Only cost me about $36 and workds great. I went from running BF3 at 70C with a stock intel sink, to running it at 41C with this hyper 212.
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a c 88 K Overclocking
November 13, 2012 2:13:05 PM

swifty_morgan said:
I have an H60. buy the 212.

these small "Water Coolers" get totally saturated with heat ( the radiator/the lines/the pump, etc. ). the case stays filled with hot air because of this. They are junk!

I won't disagree about getting a Hyper 212 but your statement about the H60 is catagorically incorrect. The only way the case will stay saturated with heat is if the system is not configured for proper airflow and guess what? A 212 won't fare any better in that situation.
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November 13, 2012 10:25:11 PM

swifty_morgan said:
I have an H60. buy the 212.

these small "Water Coolers" get totally saturated with heat ( the radiator/the lines/the pump, etc. ). the case stays filled with hot air because of this. They are junk!


Radiators are always mounted so that they dump the warm air outside of the case. Air coolers dump the warm air inside the case. Self-contained liquid coolers actually move the bulk of the heat further away from the CPU, faster.

The CM 212 is a better value if the case fits it. The H60 is great in very specific situations because of design differences. HTPCs are an example.
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a b K Overclocking
November 13, 2012 10:29:06 PM

and you're going to mount the radiator on a self enclosed system where ? inside the case, no ?

push pull doesn't matter. the small self contained are horse manure.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 1:30:58 AM

Radiator mount shouldn't matter as long as you are getting good airflow and the coolest air you can get. This might mean mounting as an intake or simply mounting as an exhaust. Either way, you still need to maintain the same level of airflow (actually, better) than when using a normal air cooler.
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a b K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 1:47:41 AM

there's more surface area to try and keep cool than with HS&F ( 212 in this case ) . it becomes saturated with heat ( the entire system ) that stays one constant temperature. HOT.
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a c 88 K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 1:56:56 AM

swifty_morgan said:
there's more surface area to try and keep cool than with HS&F ( 212 in this case ) . it becomes saturated with heat ( the entire system ) that stays one constant temperature. HOT.

Okay, at this point I can only ask that you become a little more informed. If the H series coolers (including the H60) were "junk" they wouldn't sell at all - yet they're rather popular and you rarely read threads about heat issues with them, just "will it fit..." The H60 if configured well should cool at least as well as a Hyper212 but... this is the thing, it costs more which makes the 212 a better value - not a better cooler
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November 14, 2012 3:02:37 AM

Swifty, you are right almost all the time, but your arguments are wrong this time. Your conclusion can be debated here, but the way you are getting at it is wrong.

The H60 has 21-22 fins per inch
http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1581/3/

120mm = 4.72 inches.
4.72 * 22 = 103.84 fins per row. 13 rows = 1350 fins.
Each fin is about 9.2mm x 25mm. This makes 310500 square mm of cooling surface. Double that to count both sides of a fin.

I calculate the fin area on the 212 Evo to be 325380 square mm.... more surface area. Double that to count both sides of a fin. (about what one site gave as an estimate, 6400 sq. CM.)

The surface area has little to do with the heat generated. The CPU is making the heat, not the cooler. It makes just as much heat no matter which cooler is used.

So the difference is not how much heat is created. It is how fast it is removed from the CPU, and where it goes. Every square inch of surface area is another opportunity for that heat to be shed to the air.

As far as cooling goes, this chart shows the Evo vs the Antec H2O 620, a similar cooler to the H60.
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Cooler-Master-Hy...

That's 3C difference, in favor of the Evo. About what I would expect. HOWEVER, the warm air generated by the H60 is routed out of the case, where the warm air from the EVO is dumped into the case and left for other fans to remove.

Again, I have no problems with any claims you might make as to the quality of the H60. It's just your reasoning for the perceived performance that are wrong. Also, your claims are a bit extreme compared to actual tests... but maybe you got an inferior device.
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a b K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 5:22:18 AM

Not that this really adds much, but, most older cases are designed to have air flow leave out the back of the case- It was not till about 2/3 years ago that a majority of changed designed to give people more options for airflow/and water cooling.

The H series coolers till the h 100 always specifically say to blow air in to the case rising temps inside which can affect your GPU as well as others components.

With the H-50 and 10 120 mm3000+rpm 150+ cfm fans I was still getting 5-10 degree temps on my gpu's then from changeling to a air nouctua nh d14. of course memory may be faulty but that's how I remember it that little h50 was not enough for my AMD 955 black overclocked to 4.5ghz.
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a b K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 12:56:28 PM

I guess we are in disagreement here. I ran one of those on 3 different machines/processor combos. every time the entire loop got saturated with heat and it made the entire room ( let alone the case) hotter. Put on a decent" ( arctic freezer pro ) and the entire overall temperature was so much cooler it's ridiculous.

I had the radiator mounted in front, on the back and on the top in either push, pull or push pull.... the H60 is, in my opinion, junk. And that's an unpaid, unbiased assessment.

Thanks for the charts but i try to take them with a grain of salt. As with FPS, they hardly ever tell the entire truth about what's really happening.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 1:13:37 PM

Proximon is correct with his statements.

This doesn't come down to heat saturation (which isn't technically a term or concept) but more to efficiency of each cooler. This includes surface area (which Proximon detailed), airflow, thermal conductivity and specific heat of the materials being used in the cooler and ambient room temperature.

Sticky topic on specific heat and thermal conductivity in relation to water/liquid cooling, but still applies to any materials designed to remove heat or otherwise cool a heated object:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-watercooling-sticky#t1992118

A cooler is a cooler, and if tested with the same environment variables (ambient room temp, case airflow, CPU being tested @ same speeds and voltages) then it simply is a matter of efficiency. Most 120mm radiators have the ability to remove 150+ watts depending on thickness and fin density (again, surface area) as well as the fans being used...higher RPM/higher static pressure fans will remove more heat and cool better.
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a b K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 1:31:51 PM

I will go back and read this fully when i have more time. But the analogy used kind of catches you. The engine block.

Water does not continuously flow through the engine. The coolant in the block warms as the engine runs. When it reaches a specific temperature ( 180-190 degrees ) the thermostat opens and the water pump pumps the cooler liquid that's been getting cooled in the radiator through the system When the block cools and the thermostat closes it starts all over again. In a PC with liquid cooling the coolant flows constantly. But in both cases the "loop" basically gets at or almost constantly stays at a very high temperature. That's my experience with it.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 1:48:32 PM

That becomes the working equilibrium, not heat saturation. It's all about heat dissipation at load.

If you were to drive the same car at 70mph with the less effcient radiator and hotter thermostat and then change both to a colder thermostat and more efficient radiator at 70mph, you'd see the engine would run cooler. The thermostat would signify a more restrictive loop and not allowing as free of coolant flow and the radiator is a 1:1 example for a watercooling radiator. The engine is still producing the same amount of heat in watts under the same loads in the same conditions; it's simply which method is more efficient to remove the heat and dissipate it quickly.

Water or liquid cooling should never get hot...at all. At most, you might feel a radiator slightly warm or lukewarm to the touch, but never hot. If that's the case, you have a very, very poor delta and your loop isn't able to keep up with the heat being produced.

A hot CPU and cold radiator would mean you have an airlock, no coolant, poor block mount or non-working pump.
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November 14, 2012 8:16:45 PM

swifty_morgan said:
I guess we are in disagreement here. I ran one of those on 3 different machines/processor combos. every time the entire loop got saturated with heat and it made the entire room ( let alone the case) hotter. Put on a decent" ( arctic freezer pro ) and the entire overall temperature was so much cooler it's ridiculous.


It's not me you are in disagreement with, it's the laws of physics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservation_of_energy

A CPU cooler will not make a room warmer or cooler.

A CPU converts energy into calculations and heat. That heat is directly proportional to the amount of energy it consumes, in watts.

If your claims were true, then the 212 would be magically transporting that heat to another dimension.
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a c 88 K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 8:26:08 PM

I think the OP has been answered, I vote to close this
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a b K Overclocking
November 14, 2012 8:35:43 PM

Proximon said:
It's not me you are in disagreement with, it's the laws of physics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservation_of_energy

A CPU cooler will not make a room warmer or cooler.

A CPU converts energy into calculations and heat. That heat is directly proportional to the amount of energy it consumes, in watts.

If your claims were true, then the 212 would be magically transporting that heat to another dimension.



good thing there are people who can put things in layman's terms or nothing would get answered on this site ... LOL.
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November 14, 2012 11:13:11 PM

This topic has been closed by Proximon
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