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First time overclocking Ivy Bridge - Tips and Tricks?

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November 17, 2012 4:17:29 PM

Hey guys. I just made the jump and went from my Bulldozer setup to my shiny new i5 3570K. Now I had overclocking the AMD systems down to a T, but this is the first time I've overclocked anything Intel since my old P4.
Last night I just installed my Corsair H80 and I am ready to go! I was wondering if you guys could give me some tips and tricks of the trade for overclocking these powerhouses.

My setup:
i5 3570K
Corsair H80
MSI Z77A-G45
VisionTek HD 6970
2x4GB Vengeance DDR3-1600
Antec High Current Pro 850W PS
Antec 300 Case

Thanks!
a b å Intel
a c 136 K Overclocking
November 17, 2012 7:56:23 PM

its quite simple with the unlocked core Ivy's LOL. So easy I could barely give you a tip since as is you know how to OC.
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a b å Intel
a c 136 K Overclocking
November 17, 2012 8:01:01 PM

Oh! One thing though. Ivy Bridge DOES NOT like voltage.

Start by dropping the voltage to 0.9v and then see if you get stability.
Then increase the multiplier, upping the voltages as you normally would.
Test system after each jump in V and MP.

Just remember to disable all power saving.

I also suggest to start the OC with fixed mode. Not offset.

This explains it if you already know what you are doing :
http://www.thinkcomputers.org/intel-ivy-bridge-overcloc...
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November 17, 2012 8:20:29 PM

I've read a walk through that says you should use offset mode. Why should I use fixed?
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2012 8:52:34 PM

I use a offset voltage it's what I prefer, I would also leave all the power saving features on - that way when you are not taxing the CPU it drops down to 1.6ghz while using a low voltage, like for example in my own personal experience at desktop sitting there doing small things it jumps around and gets as low as .984 and stays at 1.6ghz then under load my voltage tops out at 1.096v.
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a b å Intel
a c 136 K Overclocking
November 17, 2012 8:54:43 PM

full_out said:
I've read a walk through that says you should use offset mode. Why should I use fixed?


Initially its easier to achieve stability with fixed. Afterwards you can attempt with an offset. By using fixed you could achieve stability easier, giving you an idea of what your chip can achieve.

Then you can use offset to fine tune it.
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a b å Intel
a c 136 K Overclocking
November 17, 2012 8:56:25 PM

Orlean said:
I use a offset voltage it's what I prefer, I would also leave all the power saving features on - that way when you are not taxing the CPU it drops down to 1.6ghz while using a low voltage, like for example in my own personal experience at desktop sitting there doing small things it jumps around and gets as low as .984 and stays at 1.6ghz then under load my voltage tops out at 1.096v.


You mad??? :heink: 

How are you creating as few variables as possible by leaving power saving on?

OCing is all about control!!!
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November 17, 2012 9:06:38 PM

Novuake said:
Initially its easier to achieve stability with fixed. Afterwards you can attempt with an offset. By using fixed you could achieve stability easier, giving you an idea of what your chip can achieve.

Then you can use offset to fine tune it.


Good call. I can't wait to start screwing around with this setup :D  This thing at stock destroys my old FX-4100 at 4.7ghz.
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November 17, 2012 9:35:16 PM

Best answer selected by full_out.
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a b K Overclocking
November 18, 2012 2:16:30 AM

Novuake said:
You mad??? :heink: 

How are you creating as few variables as possible by leaving power saving on?

OCing is all about control!!!



No I'm not mad, for the overclock I intended to use it works and based on the information I found at the time when I wanted to overclock this setup it was recommended to use a offset voltage for a light/moderate overclock. Unless you plan on doing record high overclocks then yes the power saving features should be turned off to have full control - in fact when choosing a multiplier value ( at least on my motherboard) it automatically disables power saving features past a certain number.
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