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Windows 7 compatible AGP

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 6, 2010 9:51:13 PM

Hello experts, noob here. I have a Sony Vaio PCV-RZ56G (3.4 GHz Pentium 4) with 1 AGP slot, came with an ATI Radeon 9600XT with 128MB. The power supply is 300W and does not have a 6 pin connector.

Windows 7 is an inevitability. What is the best graphics card I can get for this machine that will be compatible with, and get the most out of, 32 bit Windows 7? Somebody here probably knows right off the top of the head and I'll spend hours struggling.

Many thanks in advance.

More about : windows compatible agp

a b U Graphics card
February 6, 2010 10:04:43 PM

The best AGP cards you could get are the HD 3850 or HD 4650. But whether they have drivers for Windows 7, I dont know. What you could do is try the Vista drivers, most of the time you can get away with doing that when there is a lack of Win7 drivers.
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February 6, 2010 10:26:50 PM

I tried a Sapphire HD 4650 but it needs a 6 pin connector for the power supply, which this PC unfortunately does not have.
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a b U Graphics card
February 6, 2010 10:36:24 PM

Accually before that I should have asked what do you plan on using this computer for? Gaming or surfing the web/every day things?

For Gaming the 3850/4650 are the most powerfull solution for AGP, thus you will need to upgrade your PSU in order to use it.

For non gaming use we can find you an older AGP card that dose not need a 6pin and will fit within your 300w PSU. However such a card will be so old that it is no longer supported for drivers thus you wont be able to install it into your Windows 7 computer.
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a b U Graphics card
February 6, 2010 10:57:03 PM

^^ I did not know they made an AGP version of that card, good find DatmannII. Should fit the OPs non gaming needs perfectly.
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a c 147 U Graphics card
a b $ Windows 7
February 6, 2010 10:57:26 PM

I wouldn't buy Windows 7 and a video card for this system. That's a big chunk of a pretty good system.

If you price things right you can get a good computer (without monitor, mouse etc) for $700. It'll cost you $120 for Windows 7 OEM and another $100 or so for an AGP with any oomph.

Your CPU won't do much for most modern games. Your computer's pretty much a lost cause for gaming and I don't see why else you'd upgrade.

If you really need to get a new AGP card get one of the ATI HD4xxx series. There are some fun older games that can still look pretty good. Search for Demos and get an idea of how you stack up but don't expect miracles.
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February 17, 2010 10:24:27 AM

You could do a rebuild for around $250 that will include a mobo running PCI-e, processor and ram.
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a c 147 U Graphics card
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2010 1:23:51 AM

About rebuilding:

You can only transfer XP to a new system if it is a FULL version. If it was purchased as OEM or with a prebuilt system it will not be transferable and thus can't be activated.

He would still need a new Power Supply.

Windows 7 plus the Power Supply would be roughly $200 so we're up to $450 for a very basic rebuild.

Here's a quick idea of a good upgrade (prices will vary, look for online sales at NCIX, Tigerdirect and others. Factor in shipping. In USD.):

1) Windows 7 64bit Premium OEM: $104
2) i5-750 Intel CPU: $208
3) 1156 Motherboard - Gigabyte P55A-UD4P $175
4) PSU: Corsair TX750W $114 (SALE PRICE)
5) RAM/Memory: Corsair XMS3 CMX4GX3M2A1600C7 4GB DDR3 2X2GB DDR3-1600 CL 7-8-7-20 Core i5 Dual Channel Memory Kit: $120 (SALE PRICE)
6) Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black 640GB: $66
7) Graphics Card (see comments): $60 or more

Total: $847

1. Windows 7: If you need to get a new OS then Windows 7 is it. If so, you'll definitely want the 64bit version. In the recent past 64-bit was an issue. Not now. In fact, you'd need a special reason NOT to get it. 32-bit limits the RAM you can use. The maximum is about 3GB, less if you have a 1GB video card. OEM means you pay a lot less. You can't move it to another computer, but why pay more than double for that option?

2. CPU: You can easily get a solid dual-core CPU for about $80. If you know you'll never want to play games or do any heavy processing that's worth considering.

3. Motherboard: The socket is 1156. The socket plus CPU combo for 1156 is cheaper and consumes much less power than an equivalent 1366. The 2x8 or 1x16 PCIe lanes can support up to TWO HD5870's before maxing out PCIe bandwidth. Most people should get an 1156 motherboard and CPU.

4. PSU: Very important. Don't skimp on a cheap one; if so you may get many issues (the least is fan noise, the worst is a fire). Corsair is a good quality version. Look for sales.

5. RAM: 4GB is optimal. You're unlikely to need 8GB which mainly just adds heat. Don't get less.

6. Hard drive: WD is a good name now. I do recommend a backup drive and use Acronis True Image to make a Windows IMAGE. Backup drive recommended is a WD 1TB Green EARS. I will be recommending a Solid State Drive in about two years for a main drive. Price and quality are still holding them back.

7. Graphics card: Unless you are into gaming I'd recommend something like the HD4550. If in doubt at least the cards only about $60. If you want something more then you should get a DX11 version for future-proofing. And if you get that you should WAIT for NVidia's new cards. After a month or more, the ATI cards will drop too but for various reasons I'm wanting to go with NVidia now.

Other:
1. DVD burner not included (If not an issue, hold off for BluRay burners to drop in price). Otherwise, $25 get's you a nice burner. Buy one with a firmware update less than a year old (check it's web page). Firmware updates are for disc compatibility otherwise you get burn errors (unfortunately many great DVD burners need to be replaced ONLY because of a lack of new firmware. A situation the manufacturers have no intention of changing and something which could easily be fixed by moving the firmware from the DVD chip into a simple Microsoft Update. I digress... )

2. Look for sales.

3. Read reviews for each part.

4. Buy for the next five years (except the graphics card).

5. Don't get a cheap quality PSU or Motherboard.

I hope you found this useful. You can buy a cheap $500 prebuilt system from many stores. They have cheap motherboards and if they even have a graphics card expansion slot you'd most likely need to replace the Power Supply to upgrade it.

You can build a quality system for as low as $600. For the reasons above it's worth it to spend a little more. A more efficient PSU and avoiding bad parts will quickly close the gap in price while giving better performance.

Cheers.
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April 16, 2013 1:14:49 PM

paperfox said:
The best AGP cards you could get are the HD 3850 or HD 4650. But whether they have drivers for Windows 7, I dont know. What you could do is try the Vista drivers, most of the time you can get away with doing that when there is a lack of Win7 drivers.


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April 16, 2013 1:16:46 PM

Geforce FX 5200 worked great with the Vista driver on Win 7. At least something good comes out of Vista. Great answer Paperfox.
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a c 147 U Graphics card
a b $ Windows 7
April 18, 2013 6:18:19 PM

OVV said:
Geforce FX 5200 worked great with the Vista driver on Win 7. At least something good comes out of Vista. Great answer Paperfox.


You do realize this thread is over THREE YEARS OLD?
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