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WinXP instal error on new HDD in old computer

Last response: in Windows XP
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October 5, 2012 9:01:45 PM

I’m attempting to refurbish my old Dell Dimension 8400 which I purchased in 2004. I’ve had a suspicion for a quite a while that the computer has a virus(es); however, I was never able to find anything using several different anti-virus programs. With the possibility of a stealthy virus (or something else) in mind, I purchased a new WD5000AUDX hard drive. (My plan was to simply swap out the old hard drive, and reinstall Window XP on the new hard drive.) Because the new WD hard drive has a SATA 6.0Gb/s interface, and I wanted to be able to utilize this, so I also purchased a new Vantec UGT-ST622 R PCIe SATA 6 Gb/s host card. (By the way, I also installed a new CMOS battery on the motherboard.)

So, I configured BIOS to read first from the CD drive where I had my WinXP CD eagerly waiting. The Windows XP installation seemed to be going along smoothly, but then I got the following error message:


“A problem has been detected and windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer.

If this is the first time you’ve seen this stop error screen, restart your computer. If this screen appears again, follow these steps:

Check for viruses on your computer. Remove any newly installed hard drives or hard drive controllers. Check your hard drive to make sure it is properly configured and terminated. Run CHKDSK /F to check for hard drive corruption, and then restart your computer.

Technical information:
***Stop: 0x0000007B (0xF78DA63C, 0xC0000034, 0x00000000, 0x00000000)”



Since it was the first time, I restarted – but then the exact same thing happened and I got the same error message. I have the following questions/ thoughts:

1. Considering the hard drive is new, and the CMOS battery was out for several hours before being replaced by a new one, could a virus still be “living” somewhere? If so, how do I get rid of it?

2. The new hard drive has no jumper installed. Do I need to do something so that the old Dell Dimension 8400 can play nice with the new SATA host card and new hard drive? (I can see the new WD hard drive listed under BIOS.) How do I “make sure it is properly configured and terminated”?

3. Does the error code above mean anything to anyone?

4. This is a really embarrassing rookie question, but I forgot how to get into DOS to run CHKDSK. I did this years ago, but now I can’t remember. How do I do this -- or is this unnecessary?

Thanks!
October 5, 2012 11:11:54 PM

Aha! A new SATA drive controller! That error means the XP installer cannot find a hard drive. That is because XP does not know about SATA drives unless you use the F6 key and provide the proper SATA drivers.
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October 6, 2012 1:23:25 AM

PhilFrisbie said:
Aha! A new SATA drive controller! That error means the XP installer cannot find a hard drive. That is because XP does not know about SATA drives unless you use the F6 key and provide the proper SATA drivers.



OK, so what do I do?

When do I use the F6 key, and how do I install the drivers before I install XP? (The SATA card did come with an installation guide and drivers CD.)

Please advise.

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October 6, 2012 2:03:17 AM

Make sure that the SATA ports on the new card are set for "legacy" or "IDE" or "AHA" or "compatible" mode instead of "AHCI". Out of the box XP won't boot in AHCI mode.

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October 6, 2012 2:42:43 AM

ex_bubblehead said:
Make sure that the SATA ports on the new card are set for "legacy" or "IDE" or "AHA" or "compatible" mode instead of "AHCI". Out of the box XP won't boot in AHCI mode.

Yes, because this is an add-in SATA card I forgot about that option.

When your BIOS initializes you should see an option to hit a key to get into the SATA card's BIOS and change that setting.
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October 6, 2012 3:10:22 AM

jiroband said:
OK, so what do I do?

When do I use the F6 key, and how do I install the drivers before I install XP? (The SATA card did come with an installation guide and drivers CD.)

Please advise.


A to your Q 1. The BIOS battery was out long enough to remove any virus if the BIOS was infected

A to your Q 2. SATA hard drives don't normally need jumpers, they may need them for the exceptions mentioned here:

Why does a SATA hard drive have jumpers?
http://superuser.com/questions/56270/why-does-a-sata-ha...

Your new SATA host card should include a drivers CD... but to install them on a new Hard Drive w/o OS you may need to slipstream them on a Bootable Windows XP CD.. depends on what results you get after enabling IE mode in the BIOS.

You could configure the BIOS to use the Hard Drive in IDE Mode, IDE Native or IDE Legacy.. whichever the setting is called in your BIOS. If the IDE setting is available in your BIOS, enabling it should make the HD work like an IDE hard drive so you can install Windows XP W/O having to use the F6 key, and you can install the SATA drivers later from Windows XP.

The SATA Host Card may be a different story.. if the BIOS recognizes a SATA controller, you may be able to finish installing Windows XP, and if doesn't you may have to slipstream the SATA host card drivers to Windows XP using the application nLite... BUT first check PhilFrisbie's last reply on this... that along with enabling IDE Mode in the BIOS may be your definite solution.

A to your Q 3. Advanced troubleshooting for "Stop error code 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE)" errors in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324103

A to your Q 4. It's unnecessary to perform CHKDSK on a new hard drive.
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October 16, 2012 4:01:23 AM

Here’s where I am:
1. I installed my new Vantec UGT-ST622 SATA PCIe card, and then attached the new hard drive via SATA cable. As far as the suggestions to set the SATA ports in BIOS to “legacy, etc. instead of AHCI,” My four options were: “RAID Autodetect/ AHCI,” “RAID Autodetect/ ATA,” “RAID ON,” and lastly “Combination (SATA/PATA combination mode).” I chose “Combination.”
2. Per the instructions that came with my new Vantec UGT-ST622 SATA PCIe card, I copied the correct folder with drivers onto a floppy disk. As I began the Win XP install, I pressed F6 at the correct time, and put in the floppy when told to do so – choosing the “S” option to locate the driver.
3. The instructions from Vantec said to scroll to the Asmedia 106x SATA Controller driver, but I was not able to get that far. Instead, I got the following error message:
“the file txtsetup.oem could not be found.”
So, I stopped, removed the floppy, found the txtsetup.oem file, and copied it to the floppy outside of the folder so hopefully the install could find it right away. I started over, and when the install got to the appropriate spot, I got this error message:
“txtsetup.oem caused an unexpected error (4096) at line 1742 in d:\xpsp1\base\boot\setup\oemdisk.c.”
Now I got really frustrated, so I unplugged the SATA cable from the Vantec card and plugged it into the SATA I port built into the motherboard. I installed Win XP, went through all the restart and finalization, and then installed the Vantec software from the CD. Then:
1. I reconnected the SATA cable from the HD to the Vantec card, and set BIOS to “RAID Autodetect/ AHCI.”
2. I re-booted, and Win XP took f - o - r - e - v - e - r to start. I mean an excruciatingly long time. I shut down completely and restarted … the same slow boot again.
3. I checked the Device Manager, and the driver from the Vantec CD is there, and it says device is working properly.
4. I went back into BIOS and reset SATA to “Combination,” and Win XP now boots much faster, but still not as fast as it should.
Another strange thing: my new HD is called Drive “F,” and I can’t change it to “C” since the OS is already installed.
What did I do wrong, and can I save it, or will I ultimately need to do a new XP install to make things right? By the way, thanks for your help everyone!
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October 16, 2012 4:55:40 PM

I forgot to mention that now it stops during Win XP startup and asks me to press F1 to continue. What does this mean?

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October 18, 2012 9:39:47 PM

If you installed Windows XP on drive F, it was probably because drive C wasn't available.. also drive F may be on the new hard drive(?)... if this is the case, the older hard drive may be causing the F1 problem.

In my experience the F1 key is required when there's a Hard Drive in dubious condition. To try and solve it, you may want to:
1. Disable the S.M.A.R.T. BIOS Setting
2. Reset the BIOS
3. Update the BIOS
4. Check if an older Hard Drive (if installed) is in good condition. I'd suggest you use 'Hard Disk Sentinel" to get a quick and relatively accurate diagnose.

Also see if something here helps.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/324495-31-press-conti...
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January 28, 2014 11:40:31 AM

I've dealt with this issue thrice now, and every time its been dying CMOS battery causing the bios settings for the Drive Controller to default to AHCI, when it should be set to SATA.
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