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Consequences of OC'ing with sufficient cooling?

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November 21, 2012 11:46:41 PM

I have been considering overclocking for some time now. What stops me every time from actually doing it is my concern of the hardware dying. Obviously, you're going to have a bad time if you overclock a CPU and use the stock fan. But what if you use a good enough fan to the point where overheating is not an issue? In other words, assuming you have an adequate fan so that the CPU does not overheat, what cons remain from overclocking? Thank you in advance.
a c 78 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 22, 2012 1:21:05 AM

Heat will shorten the lifespan of your CPU, but too much voltage (even with good temps) can shorten the lifespan of the CPU too.

I have yet to find a definitive "scale" that one can use to gauge how much life is lost with different voltages.

I generally try to stay close to stock voltage. (I use the max voltage at stock clock and then try to keep the voltage at or near that number as I push the clock frequency)


This is a rather "wimpy" approach to overclocking, but I intend to keep my PC's "in the family" (if not at my desk) for many years.

If I planned on ditching my computer every 3 years as some people do, I would push my chips up against their max-voltage and just use crazy cooling to keep the temps down.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 22, 2012 1:52:56 PM

I had a q6600 that was over clocked for 5 years straight and it is still worki g just fine in my mothers computer that I passed down. My current CPU is a i7920, I've had it overclocked to 3.6ghz from a stock 2.6 for over 3 years and counting.

Each CPU architecture has a max voltage recommended by the manufacturer. As long as you stay well below that and keep the CPU cool, it should last longer than you want it to.
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a c 95 à CPUs
a c 224 K Overclocking
November 22, 2012 2:25:33 PM

ukballer1012 said:
I have been considering overclocking for some time now. What stops me every time from actually doing it is my concern of the hardware dying. Obviously, you're going to have a bad time if you overclock a CPU and use the stock fan. But what if you use a good enough fan to the point where overheating is not an issue? In other words, assuming you have an adequate fan so that the CPU does not overheat, what cons remain from overclocking? Thank you in advance.


With overclocking becoming more and more popular not just in the overclocking community of individuals itself but the hardware manufacturers marketing overclockable CPUs and GPUs, that you'll find there are many just like you wondering the same things.

When you have no experience with something the unknown is always a scary thing that can keep you from doing something that could be very beneficial to you further down the road even to the point of wondering why you took so long to get into it.

When the unknown is know you'll usually be ready to kick yourself from the fact of the performance you could have enjoyed during the time the fear was overriding your choice to overclock.

It's very rare for a conservative overclocker to ever destroy any hardware, sometimes hardware is lost from basically lack of knowledge of how to do what you want to do.

My motto regarding overclocking is "Learn First Then Do!", meaning first learn what platform will give you the best overclocks for what you use your computer to do, then learn how to overclock that platform of your choice.

If you learn what you're doing first!, the chances of you destroying any hardware are literally slim and none, you'll also learn from others experience at what's the best recommendations of running your hardware for longevity, (meaning to last you as long as possible.).

Here's a fact; Heat is the overclocking limiter, the cooler you can keep the hardware the further you can safely overclock it, that's why there are so many after market cooling solutions, if overclocking was completely out of the picture there would be no need for after market cooling solutions that are marketed for the overclocking community.

Another fact; Voltage can instantly kill hardware, applying a voltage way past specs even with after market cooling can instantly destroy your hardware, that's why it is so important to Learn First Then Do! You learn what voltages are safe to use and you learn what voltages not to use, these are facts you must know, that's why learning is so important.

Ryan
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