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Online gaming issues - wheres my bottleneck

Last response: in Networking
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January 17, 2010 6:00:28 AM

I want to get as much information as i can before i call up my ISP and calmly talk to them :whistle: 

I play wow (shocking i know) and lately have been having more and more issues with high latency and getting disconnected. Sometimes the connection will come right for 5-10 mins then back to high latency (around 900-2k - should be around 400) or suddenly alot of data will come in and my screen will go crazy while the game catches up normally resulting in a disconnect seconds later.

Some background in case your a guru at this but have never heard of wow: You play online in a raid consisting of either 9 other people from around the world or 24 other people.

I have no real issues with the 10 mans, Its only 25. This leads me to believe that My ISP in New Zealand (Vodafone) is either limiting how much bandwidth i can use more than they should or its just to much for our useless connections we have over here.

My plan is a fixed limit max up / down one so it really shouldn't be them limiting it.

PC specs are...
OS: Win 7 - 64 bit
RAM: 4gig
GPU: Radeon HD4830
CPU: AMD duel core 5000+ (2.6)
Wired connection.

I have used 7's built in tools to watch PC performance before to try determine whats going on and both networking and HDD read/sec go threw the roof just before it happens. I have had some weird results like using FRAPS (screen recording software - 0 network usage) at the same time will cause the game to crash faster every time so it makes me think that maybe the network may not be the only factor. If i can increase the load on the system and make the game crash that way doesn't that indicate that maybe something else could be contributing?

Are there some better tools i can get to find the root of the problem, Im getting sick of calling the ISP and them just saying theres nothing they can do.

Thanks for any help
January 21, 2010 3:50:13 AM

google speed test and run one; compare the results to your ISP's advertised bandwidth.
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