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Looking for some info about setting your Paging Files?

Last response: in Memory
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September 27, 2010 5:34:26 PM

Hi Guys, Should i have both the C:\ and the E:\ drive set to a custom size (if so what size) or have them both automatically managed? then again i read its best to have no paging file set on the C:\ Drive and set the paging file on the E:\ drive? This particular PC has 4 gigs of ram, its a dell 4600 and i have all 4 slots filled with 1gig of ddr ram.

I just installed windows 7 32bit and would really like know the best way to set this up.

Thank you for any and all information you can share, i sure would appreciate it1
Ed
September 27, 2010 6:29:12 PM

The paging file is used when you have limited ram or are using lots of ram.
With 4 Gbs of ram do you need more memory?
With NT I used a page file on two drives so the os could acess both at the same time and save a bit of time. Not sure if it's true today.
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a c 347 } Memory
September 27, 2010 6:30:12 PM

^ {C drive} if it is an SSD then it doesn't matter - fragmentation doesn't matter to an SSD.

So, if you mean {E drive} is simply a partition or USB drive then sure it would be better, but having enough RAM is what is all about. Running w/o a page file is indeed faster, but if your physical runs out - crash.
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September 28, 2010 3:15:33 PM

Thanks for your help guys, now in this particular case i have windows 7 32bit installed and i believe the default is set to where the first box is checked off "automatically manage paging files for all drives" everything else is grayed out, now i have the C:\ Drive which is where my OS is installed "32bit win 7" and a separate physical hard-drive, my E:\ drive
The PC is a single core with the maximum ram installed at 4gigs.

id like to have it set to perform its best, so Im not sure if i should leave it at the default or uncheck the auto box and type in the paging file for the C:\ drive and have the E:\ drive set with either no paging file or have it set to "system managed", or type in the initial and maximum size just as i would for the C:\ drive or should i have it the other way around and set the c:\ drive to none and set the paging file on the E:\ drive?

FYI - these are both 500 gig drives, with no partitions.

Thanks for your help with this guys!
Ed

ps...if its suggested i do type in the size what should i set the sizes too?
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a c 347 } Memory
September 28, 2010 3:35:22 PM

^ In XP tweaking the pagefile meant more and RAM X 1.5, etc. Again, "ideally" on a USB, partition, or secondary HDD is "better" - fastest + least likely to be fragmented {USB or SSD}. I'd leave it set to System Managed, but again it won't play a significant role until your Physical RAM gets low.

Also, there would be no way if I had 4 GB of RAM and turn it off; you're just begging for a crash. Now if I had, say, 8 GB+ on Windows 64-bit then sure; yes, that would guarantee a faster system assuming you didn't have an app with a memory leak.
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September 29, 2010 2:45:32 PM

Again thank you for your thoughts, and just to clear things up, are you suggesting i have that first Box ticked which states "automatically manage paging files for all drives" Which would be both physical drives, the C and E drive? Remember i am running windows 7 32bit, not xp.

I dont have any SSD, and the E drive is internal pluged in via sata, but the C:\ drive is not, its hooked up with the IDE cable (not sure if that matters)

Here is a snapshot of the box...is this how i should have it setup?
Thank you so much for yourhelp!

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a c 347 } Memory
September 29, 2010 11:18:44 PM

^ The principles of the paging file are the same in Windows XP, Vista, or 7; the paging file is located in one (1) place. According to the image it would appear that you have 4GB RAM and the paging file is located on your primary "C" drive on a nearly full HDD {~44GB available}. In general, for best performance you want to leave 20-25% unused.

The "E" SATA would probably be a better location.

However, to "speed" up your PC there are a lot of easy things: 1. run MSCONFIG and load Diagnostic + Microsoft start-ups + AV and add as required from there.
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October 2, 2010 1:08:32 PM

jaquith said:
^ The principles of the paging file are the same in Windows XP, Vista, or 7; the paging file is located in one (1) place. According to the image it would appear that you have 4GB RAM and the paging file is located on your primary "C" drive on a nearly full HDD {~44GB available}. In general, for best performance you want to leave 20-25% unused.

The "E" SATA would probably be a better location.

However, to "speed" up your PC there are a lot of easy things: 1. run MSCONFIG and load Diagnostic + Microsoft start-ups + AV and add as required from there.


Okay so again just so i understand correctly, your suggesting i untick the "automatically manage paging files for all drives" Box at the top, Tick the "custom" Box, click on the c:\ drive and have none for a paging file, click set, then click on the E:\ (sata) drive and type in a custom Paging file? If so what should i type in as the initial and max sizes?


As for your last suggestion, I do understand how to check off any unnecessary programs in the start up tab in MSCONFIG however im not unsure what you mean when you suggest "Load Diagnostic + Microsoft start-ups + AV and add as required from there?

Would you mind explaining that a little more for me?

Thank you so very much for your time in responding, i do appreciate it!
Ed
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a c 347 } Memory
October 2, 2010 2:30:25 PM

To move your Paging File you would need to uncheck "Automatically manage..." and moving it to to a faster HDD "E" will help you only when you physical RAM is running low, and you can use "System Managed Size" which should be ~ the same size as your RAM.

The largest gain in speed will come from unchecking unnecessary start-up Apps. Please keep in mind that many of these startup {Helper} Apps are not needed to be running all of the time and will load up as soon as the {Primary} App is loaded. The only {Helper} Apps that benefit you are Apps required to "recognize" when for example a Camera or iPod etc is physically connected to start say Photoshop or iTunes. Most importantly, you can tweak those start-ups quickly and easily. LESS = MORE speed.

Good Luck!
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October 16, 2010 4:52:42 PM

jaquith said:
To move your Paging File you would need to uncheck "Automatically manage..." and moving it to to a faster HDD "E" will help you only when you physical RAM is running low, and you can use "System Managed Size" which should be ~ the same size as your RAM.

The largest gain in speed will come from unchecking unnecessary start-up Apps. Please keep in mind that many of these startup {Helper} Apps are not needed to be running all of the time and will load up as soon as the {Primary} App is loaded. The only {Helper} Apps that benefit you are Apps required to "recognize" when for example a Camera or iPod etc is physically connected to start say Photoshop or iTunes. Most importantly, you can tweak those start-ups quickly and easily. LESS = MORE speed.

Good Luck!



Thank you so much for helping me wrap my head around this, you really helped me out and thanks again for your time and knowladge ;-)
Ed
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