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When is power on and power off?

Last response: in Systems
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February 16, 2010 5:37:08 PM

Have new MOBO from MSI that has an illuminated "Power switch" on the board itself.
Their manual states "This button will light after you power-on the system,and the light will turn off when you power-off the system"
The problem is this "illumination" NEVER turns off, untill you turn-off or disconect the AC from the power supply unit.
In computereese is "power-on" when AC power is applied at the PSU?
Is "power-on" when current reaches the switch and the switch is opened?
I would like a consensus here as to power-on and power off so I can argue with my vendor about the condition of the NEW MOBO.
Thanks

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a b B Homebuilt system
February 16, 2010 5:38:18 PM

I would read that as "power is applied to the system" and "power is not applied to the system".
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February 16, 2010 5:56:04 PM

coldsleep said:
I would read that as "power is applied to the system" and "power is not applied to the system".


But WHERE is "power applied"? At the switch or PSU?
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 16, 2010 6:00:55 PM

oldgnube said:
But WHERE is "power applied"? At the switch or PSU?


Sorry, that was more computerese. :) 

Computerese:
Power applied = computer/PSU plugged into the wall, motherboard has power connections, actual state of the OS doesn't matter
Power not applied = computer/PSU not plugged into the wall, motherboard state doesn't matter, but probably connected properly
Powered up/on = everything plugged in and you pressed the power button, an OS is running or is being loaded
Powered down/off = everything plugged in and you shut the computer down via the OS or holding down the power button

Standard usage (doesn't really take plugged into the wall into consideration):
Powered up/on = you pressed the button/switch to turn on the computer
Powered down/off = you shut down the computer through the OS or by holding down the power switch

I suspect that they are using the standard phrasing to mean the more specific applied/not applied.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 17, 2010 4:11:20 PM

Don't forget the PSU has to be on too to get to power applied.
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