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What exactly is overclocking

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November 26, 2012 8:59:42 AM

Sorry, but I am most certainly a person that doesn't know very much about CPU's so could someone please answer my question.

More about : overclocking

a c 99 à CPUs
a c 231 K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 9:10:53 AM

To my wife; overclocking is setting her clock 15 minutes ahead to get to work on time! :lol: 

That's actually not a joke, she really does do that.

What is overclocking?

Overclocking is simply running your hardware faster than it was spec'd to run.

There are various ways to accomplish this.

Hardware altering, (Not recommended because it requires extreme skills and is done at the expense of your warranty!)

BIOS Auto Overclocking, (Usually used by those too lazy to learn how to actually overclock or a newbie to overclocking!)

Operating System Auto Overclocking, ( ^ Same reasons as above ^)

BIOS Manual Overclocking, (The Chosen route for those that study up on overclocking and know what they're doing!)

Overclocking reasons vary from, "Because I can", (Usually an idiot response from someone without the ability to put why they do it into words! :)  Jking) ~ "I'm enjoying getting more than I actually paid for", (The Traditional answer for overclocking!).

Overclocking does require you having overclockable hardware, and how far someone gets overclocking is actually dependent on your hardwares overclockable capability.

Overclocking increases load temperatures and has to be accounted for usually by replacing a stock cooler with some type after market cooling, either air or water cooling, to keep the added overclocking load temperatures under control for the longevity of your hardware.

Any Questions? Ryan



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November 26, 2012 9:16:21 AM

Okay, thanks for explaining what overclocking is but how do I overclock?
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a c 115 à CPUs
a c 176 K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 9:17:35 AM

Processors work at various speeds (represented by its frequency, measured in Ghz). Overclocking is just making your CPU (or GPU or even RAM) run faster than than its supposed too for extra performance.

Advantages to overclocking.
- Essentially a free(ish) performance boost

Disadvantages to Overclocking
- Greater heat output so you need aftermarket cooling to deal with this.
- Greater power draw.
- If you are overclocking quite hard, can affect the lifespan of the CPU negatively.
- If you do something stupid like apply way too much voltage, can kill your chip.

EDIT: Heres some good overclocking tutorials. Though if your on Intel, you need a "K" edition processor and a P67, Z68 or Z77 motherboard. All AMD systems are good for overclocking.

Ivy Bridge CPU overclocking guide, same basic rules for other chips though
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCIWTX-jy9A

GPU overclocking guide.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gA_l5-HDel4
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November 26, 2012 9:25:36 AM

Thanks manofchalk for your detailed answer!
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a c 81 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 9:42:21 AM

Don't be afraid of overclocking. It's relatively easy. I did this for the first time a couple months ago, and my system runs fast (i5-2500k @ 4.4GHz) and excellent stability. I found a couple guides out there and tried them out, and found one guide that worked best for my system. Like I said, I never did overclocking before but highly recommend it if you want to get the most out of your system.

I can't see any disadvantages other than financial cost. "K" series CPU (+$10) + Special CPU cooler ($30) + extra fans ($5) = ~$50 more than if I went with a i5-2500.
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November 26, 2012 10:09:26 AM

Thanks for the encouragement envy14tpe.
But you seem to have the i5 2500K which is unlocked. To my understanding CPUs that are not unlocked cannot be overclocked. So I would just like to know if the intel i7 3770 is locked or unlocked.
BTW is HTML enabled on this forum

------------------------------------------------
-intel i7 3770 8 CPUs
-Nvida GT640
-8 GB DDR3 RAM
-1TB SSD
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a c 115 à CPUs
a c 176 K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 10:14:23 AM

Nup, needs to have K on the end of the model number for it to be unlocked. You can still overclock using the FSB (old method, before unlocked multipliers), but its a lot more complicated than using a multiplier and the quality of your RAM is a big factor in how far you can go.

You can bold and italicize things if thats what you mean. Beyond simple stuff like that I dont think you can.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 10:49:32 AM



Overclocking is the act of changing the clock speeds or frequencies of a certain component in a computer. It is usually done in the BIOS for CPUs/Memory, or using a specialized tool in Windows for video cards (such as MSI After Burner). Overclocking a component increases its speed, but if it is not done correctly, can make the computer run unstable, or can even damage components. Temperatures are the main thing to look out for while overclocking. If you do not have adequate cooling, the components will at some point overheat, which can cause failure. You also have to keep the voltages in check. Overclocking a component too far with stock voltage can cause instabilities. If the BIOS lets you, voltages can be changed for the CPU and other hardware. Increasing the voltages of a component will increase its heat output significantly.

Long story short, don't overclock if you are not comfortable doing so. Because doing something wrong can turn out to be very bad. Including giving a component far too much voltage, and literally frying said component.

Some manufactures have more lenient restrictions on their warranties when it comes to overclocking. Read your warranty well. For me overclocking is a hobby and very addictive i am so hooked i would not even use a computer that could not be overclocked seriously lol.If you have intel cpu you basically do it like this might be a little different.First off Download CPU-Z - Realtemp -Prime95 - just like any overclocking you will need to enter the bios. Depending on your motherboard I always recommend going to the Save/Exit section and select restore to Defaults just in case some settings were changed if you were adjusting things so we can start fresh.





Main BIOS Screen:


Save/Exit


One thing that I always recommend is disabling all the things you are not using such as eSata, USB 3.0 etc. After that depending on your motherboard you should have an Overclocking section so we need to go here next.


First go ahead and set your CPU Multiplier between 40 and 45. Since the Baseclock on most P67 motherboards should be 100mhz, 100mhz x 40=4ghz etc. This is the option that we will use because Sandy Bridge is very testy when it comes to adjusting the Baseclock.


Next go to VDroop and change this to without Vdroop. This will basically help reduce sagging while we run Prime95 or Linx and keep the voltage stable.


Next go to Internal PLL Voltage Override and set this to Enable- This is a very important step whenever you are using a multiplier of 40 and greater.


Next go to CPU VCore and set this to manual and then I would recommend starting at 1.300V for 4ghz and if you want 4.5 you will more than likely need about 1.325 but always remember to test in small increments in order to achieve a nice stable overclock. This may vary on your CPU whether or not you have the same identical one as someone else.


Next head over to the memory section of your BIOS and set the DIMM voltage to whatever the manufacturers specifications.


Now we need to configure some other very important features in our Bios which some are completely optional but I would highly recommend changing them for stability.


First go to EIST (Intel Speedstep Technology)and disable this feature. Basically this allows your CPU to throttle down below even the stock 3.4ghz when tasks are at a minimum so it is optional but I always disable it.


Next got to C1E Support and disable this feature. This is another power saving feature but enabling this might cause instability.


Next go to CPU C3 Support and set this to disable. I believe this is also called Sleep where the processor does not need to keep its cache coherent but maintains another state.


Next make sure you have Turbo Mode enabled. Most P67 -Z68 motherboards have this feature.



Next up, memory settings! Make sure to configure this per your memory specifications, or use the XMP function to use the built in SPD settings (if applicable)


Now you can go ahead and Save/Exit to Windows. I would definitely recommend having some Temperature software previsously installed on your system. I swear by Coretemp but there are many others out there. Make sure you keep a close eye on your temps after booting into windows.


Now that you are in windows check you clock settings with CPUZ and I recommend running a stability test such as Prime95. Another great one is LinX which is very intense. You can run it as long as you want and there are many different opinions as to how long you should run the tests to do some research online and make your decision.I usually run LinuX for two hours and then i run prime 95 for twelve hours so far those are what work best for me they might not for you.


That is basically it.
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November 26, 2012 10:54:33 AM

So bigcyo1,
Does this mean that if I overclock a component with too much voltage it will be broken forever?
Just want to clarify :) 
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November 26, 2012 10:55:15 AM

if you have to ask then don't overclock. it'll save you a lot of money....
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November 26, 2012 10:55:38 AM

Also, I would like to clarify this too.
Do I overclock components in the BIOS?
(Sorry I did not include this in the previous post)
:( 
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November 26, 2012 10:57:00 AM

captainblacko,
If I am not familiar with OCing should I not overclock.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 11:11:55 AM

You need to do lots of research and study it first i don't recommend anyone do it after say watching a youtube video or reading up on it for twenty minutes lol that's just asking for trouble.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 11:20:48 AM

I believe 4Ryan6 has some overclocking tutorials you might ask him for them i don't really try to teach people to overclock but i help when i can.
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a c 81 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 12:22:17 PM

2020881,7,1481573 said:
Thanks for the encouragement envy14tpe.
But you seem to have the i5 2500K which is unlocked. To my understanding CPUs that are not unlocked cannot be overclocked. So I would just like to know if the intel i7 3770 is locked or unlocked.
BTW is HTML enabled on this forum

I have the 2500k, which means it is unlocked and I can overclock it. Your have a 3770 which is locked, so you can't overclock your CPU.
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a c 99 à CPUs
a c 231 K Overclocking
November 26, 2012 2:14:46 PM

e-coli said:
So bigcyo1,
Does this mean that if I overclock a component with too much voltage it will be broken forever?
Just want to clarify :) 


Affirmative!

e-coli said:
captainblacko,
If I am not familiar with OCing should I not overclock.


Affirmative!

bigcyco1 said:
You need to do lots of research and study it first i don't recommend anyone do it after say watching a youtube video or reading up on it for twenty minutes lol that's just asking for trouble.


bigcyco1 said:
I believe 4Ryan6 has some overclocking tutorials you might ask him for them i don't really try to teach people to overclock but i help when i can.


Good advice and my guides are stickied above, but they may not apply to your hardware!

e-coli, You just learned what overclocking was this morning and you're already considering doing it, STOP!

You need to study overclocking guides first and learn what you're doing before you even consider actually overclocking, anything!

Learn First then Do!
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a b K Overclocking
November 27, 2012 1:37:44 AM

Highly advise studying up on what overclocking is before you mess with anything. If you want to have some hands on time overclocking and you have and old computer you don't care about that doesn't have a locked down BIO's I would start with that just to get your feet wet. Though I doubt most of us started out like that, I know I didn't have that luxury.

So the usual recomendation is to read up and learn everything you can and than try to OC and come back to us if you have any problems. As if you attempt this without knowing what you are doing there is very good potential you can screw up your hardware or do something weird to make the computer unstable. If you have more knowledge on what you have done though than that also means not only does the risk of this happening go down, but if something does go wrong you can more intelligently tell us what happened so we can better help you fix it.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 27, 2012 1:50:36 AM

e-coli said:
So bigcyo1,
Does this mean that if I overclock a component with too much voltage it will be broken forever?
Just want to clarify :) 
Yes
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 27, 2012 4:18:25 AM

Lol!I never noticed you have a locked cpu envy14tpe is correct.Forget about it.


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a c 186 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
November 27, 2012 5:50:17 AM

The main reason why I push people to by the K unlocked CPU is because of this:
Every year they release a new CPU, that means it will be faster than your current one. Basically, just overclock till you match that performance of the next gens CPU. This will save you money from buying an entirely new system. IMO today's CPU's are plenty fast for everything already, there really isn't a point of OC on a current gen CPU.
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a c 81 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 27, 2012 6:00:46 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Lol!I never noticed you have a locked cpu envy14tpe is correct.Forget about it.


That's why I've been wondering why the person is still discussing overclocking when he/she doesn't have "k" cpu
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November 27, 2012 6:09:31 AM

Nah it's just because my main computer has a locked CPU.
I have another computer which uses an AthlonII X4.
Besides, my main computer was a pre built Dell. Whenever making my own computer I would always use an AMD.
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a c 81 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 29, 2012 10:42:48 AM

e-coli said:
Nah it's just because my main computer has a locked CPU.
I have another computer which uses an AthlonII X4.
Besides, my main computer was a pre built Dell. Whenever making my own computer I would always use an AMD.


Two years ago my friends would swear by AMD, but now they all say....yeah buy Intel. For gamers and not cheap builds, Intel is hands down winning the battle. I would have bought a AMD CPU 6 months ago if there was a good one at my mid level build, but there wasn't and isn't really one now. It's sad. I'd like more competition in the market to drive down prices.
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