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Operating system not found

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September 29, 2010 9:56:50 PM

Hello,

I purchased a brand new hard disk less than a month ago, as the other had failed. I have a HP dvPavilion 6000. After that it worked fine for about a week, then I started having problems booting up. It would work eventually after 10-20 restarts. But today it doesn't start the system at all. It either gets stuck and restarts at the HP screen, or it gets to a black screen and shows me Operating system not found. I think it is the motherboard, as the hard disk drive is brand new. Any help will be appreciated, thanks very much :) 

More about : operating system found

a c 103 V Motherboard
September 29, 2010 10:02:15 PM

Welcome to the forums, Newcomer. The error message displayed is pretty self-explanitory, but i'm curious about what goes on in your BIOS. I have a few questions...

1. Is the HDD and IDE or SATA?
2. Does the BIOS recognize the presence of the HDD?
3. Have you tried moving the connection to different port on the motherboard?
September 29, 2010 10:05:58 PM

1. HDD is SATA
2. It did recognize it until today, now when I try and run a self test it tells me there is No IDE device. I purchased the drive less than a month ago, I don't think it failed, it should be something else.
3. No, I have not tried that, how can I do so?

Thank you for helping me ;) 
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September 29, 2010 10:10:31 PM

Chances are much more likely that your HDD has died, and not your mobo, as an HDD has moving parts whereas a mobo does not. Moving parts = more things that can fail.

I think 3) refers to simply moving your SATA connector to a different SATA port on your mobo, and seeing if that fixes the problem.
September 29, 2010 10:13:45 PM

mattimeo005 said:
Chances are much more likely that your HDD has died, and not your mobo, as an HDD has moving parts whereas a mobo does not. Moving parts = more things that can fail.

I think 3) refers to simply moving your SATA connector to a different SATA port on your mobo, and seeing if that fixes the problem.


Well after it boots up, it worked fine. And it's brand new, I don't think that is the issue, but one can never know :) 
September 29, 2010 10:19:27 PM

There are many instances of HDDs failing after only a few weeks, unfortunately. Just read the reviews of any HDD on newegg, lol. I guarantee there will be someone giving a 1 egg review because it failed after a month or so. It's just one of those unfortunate things about electronics, I suppose.
a c 103 V Motherboard
September 29, 2010 10:22:46 PM

OK, first of all, if your mobo is looking for an IDE device, you have to go into your BIOS and emulate PATA/IDE. Although this doesn't explain why you were able to load from the SATA without intervention previously.

Motherboards typically come equipped with 4-6 SATA ports; all are identical. The deal with SATA is that it absolves the need to differentiate between master and slave; this is now handled in the BIOS-you can select witch boot device to load from first; just the same as you can select your boot priority.

To change the SATA port (although I don't think your problem is as simple as this), open your case, locate your HDD. Identify the SATA cable by following the cable that is connected to your HDD and leading to the motherboard. After you've traced the cable back to the motherboard, remove the motherboard-end connection, and then simply put the cable into any other SATA port.

September 29, 2010 10:23:54 PM

Ok, thanks. Will try that :) 
September 30, 2010 5:16:19 PM

AndreyBG said:
Hello,

I purchased a brand new hard disk less than a month ago, as the other had failed. I have a HP dvPavilion 6000. After that it worked fine for about a week, then I started having problems booting up. It would work eventually after 10-20 restarts. But today it doesn't start the system at all. It either gets stuck and restarts at the HP screen, or it gets to a black screen and shows me Operating system not found. I think it is the motherboard, as the hard disk drive is brand new. Any help will be appreciated, thanks very much :) 



ok, from experience this problem can be fixed by rebooting from the cd and choosing the repair windows option. if it does not work then you will need to do a reformat, remember that if you do a reformat all your data will be lost. most likely your boot record on the HDD is corrupt due to faulty memory or overclocking. this has happened to me a few times before, that's why i have an external HDD for a back-up.
September 30, 2010 5:18:30 PM

I work in a laptop and desktop repair shop and we see brand new drives fail sometimes more than old ones. I always test my new drives multiple times then weekly after that until I get to trust them. Always have a backup of your backup.
September 30, 2010 7:09:48 PM

Thanks guys, will see what I can do. Btw, every now and then I also get a Hard disk read error problem, so I guess it's the hard drive :) 
a c 103 V Motherboard
September 30, 2010 7:37:57 PM

AndreyBG, while mattimeo005's statements about HDD failures have merit, don't be so quick to blame any particular part. The most common failure of any HDD is corruption, followed by heat. Too much heat in any systems is the main ingredient for failure.

Your previous post about the self-testing and "Operating system not found" error, suggests that there is trouble in the communication between your motherboard and HDD. What was the outcome of changing SATA ports?

As their standard interface, SATA controllers use the AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface), allowing advanced features of SATA such as hotplug and native command queuing (NCQ). If AHCI is not enabled by the motherboard and chipset, SATA controllers typically operate in "IDE emulation" mode, which does not allow features of devices to be accessed if the ATA/IDE standard does not support them. I would double check your BIOS to see what 'mode' you're using to 'access' your HDD.
October 1, 2010 11:59:55 AM

T_T said:
AndreyBG, while mattimeo005's statements about HDD failures have merit, don't be so quick to blame any particular part. The most common failure of any HDD is corruption, followed by heat. Too much heat in any systems is the main ingredient for failure.

Your previous post about the self-testing and "Operating system not found" error, suggests that there is trouble in the communication between your motherboard and HDD. What was the outcome of changing SATA ports?

As their standard interface, SATA controllers use the AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface), allowing advanced features of SATA such as hotplug and native command queuing (NCQ). If AHCI is not enabled by the motherboard and chipset, SATA controllers typically operate in "IDE emulation" mode, which does not allow features of devices to be accessed if the ATA/IDE standard does not support them. I would double check your BIOS to see what 'mode' you're using to 'access' your HDD.


why does everyone say that it's in the bios? today's bios settings are dummy proof and will detect and change irq's on it's own, if the HDD worked before then it's not the bios. The bios chips are very robust. Like is said before, it cold be that your boot partition on the HDD is corrupt and most likely you will need to do a repair or reformat.
October 1, 2010 12:05:43 PM

better yet, got to any computer store and get a really cheap hdd and try to connect it in place of the old one. if you able to install the os on it then you know that your bios is doing it's job. if so, then repair or reformat and reinstall your os :(  it sucks but we all have to do it once in a while. as a rule of thumb i back up all of my stuff every week, and start with a new os install every year :) 
a c 103 V Motherboard
October 1, 2010 7:09:17 PM

nebun said:
why does everyone say that it's in the bios? today's bios settings are dummy proof and will detect and change irq's on it's own, if the HDD worked before then it's not the bios. The bios chips are very robust. Like is said before, it cold be that your boot partition on the HDD is corrupt and most likely you will need to do a repair or reformat.


While I agree that the BIOS writers are getting better and better, the reason I'm telling the OP to check the BIOS is very simple: if the HDD is seen in the BIOS, then the motherboard can be ruled out as the problem. Checking the BIOS, as fool-proof as you may believe it to be, is still just as possible to fail as any hardware, and is a far more effective way to troubleshoot.

Let's put it in this perspective. When your vehicle is acting funny, would you simply buy new parts just to guess and hope that it gets fixed? No, you wouldn't, because it isn't very practical. Rather, you'd have the vehicle checked by professionals (or hobbyists that you trust) to determine where the problem is. Similarly, just because the error message of OS not found doesn't immediately warrant the purchase of a new HDD. Buying a new HDD just because of this message would be the same as you buying a new engine when the check engine light illuminates.
October 1, 2010 8:20:14 PM

you can change the sata controller from ahci to ide/ combination/ sata native mode in the bios. I have seen a few times where the actual sata adapter is bad. best bet is to test the drive in another machine and see if you get the same results
October 2, 2010 10:44:08 PM

Thanks for the help guys, but I managed to figure out what the problem was. :)  After a lot of changes and a few restarts, my computer finally started yesterday, and I was able to use it. I have read somewhere that if you have an older computer and you put a new HDD in, if you fill it up with data more than 135 GB or so, sometimes the BIOS settings get stuck on different ends of the drive and it is unable to boot. So I shrinked my 250 GB drive to one 100 GB and one 150 GB and today when I turned on the computer, it started like it should for the first time in a week. I guess that was my problem. Come to think of it, I started getting troubles only after I filled up my HDD with lots of stuff, so I guess that affected booting up. :) 
!