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Is the Athlon II X4 630 any better/faster than the Pentium 4 HT 530

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April 25, 2010 3:58:20 PM

Hi
My current computer is:

- Intel Pentium 4 HT 530 @ 3.0 Ghz
- Asus P5GD1-FM/S Motherboard
- 2.5 GB of Dual Channel (probs DDR2 but I am not sure) RAM
- 7200 RPM 160 GB HDD 8 MB Cache
- 128 MB ATI Radeon x300 Graphics

I have ordered a new Dell system (the Dell Inspiron 570) which has the following specs:

- AMD Athlon II X4 630 @ 2.8 Ghz
- 6 GB of Dual Channel DDR3 RAM
- 640 GB 7200 RPM Hard disk
- 1 GB ATI HD4200 Graphics

I was wondering if my new system will be faster/powerful than my old system (It best be, I have splashed out a lot of my savings on it, haha)

Also, would the difference be tangible? The new system will be running Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit and the old system runs Windows XP Home 32bit if that makes any difference.

Also, what sort of temperatures would the new system be running at? My current desktop runs at 52 C at idle (this is the CPU temp) and about 65 at full load.

Sorry about all these questions, I am just goddamn excited about my new system :) 
Thanks for your time
Regards,

Mrinal
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April 25, 2010 4:09:45 PM

The Pentium 4 series could be beat by a snail(if that was a processor :p  ).

Yes, you will see a big difference. I was on an old P4 3.4ghz system(before I knew how architecture made a difference)and switched to a new system. The hard drive makes the biggest difference on the system and they've slowly gotten better over time since your old system. The graphics card is also improved, but I don't think that card will play games well if you were planning on that.

Windows 7 might make the load times about the same, but the responsiveness of the system will be improved.

AMD processors are usually lower on temps than intel processors(especially the P4). I'm not exactly sure what that processor will be running on temps though. Maybe 40C idle and low 50Cs on load?Might be lower since that is an athlon with no l3 cache(don't worry about the cache it doesn't make much of a difference).
April 25, 2010 4:21:57 PM

Haserath said:
The Pentium 4 series could be beat by a snail(if that was a processor :p  ).

Yes, you will see a big difference. I was on an old P4 3.4ghz system(before I knew how architecture made a difference)and switched to a new system. The hard drive makes the biggest difference on the system and they've slowly gotten better over time since your old system. The graphics card is also improved, but I don't think that card will play games well if you were planning on that.

Windows 7 might make the load times about the same, but the responsiveness of the system will be improved.

AMD processors are usually lower on temps than intel processors(especially the P4). I'm not exactly sure what that processor will be running on temps though. Maybe 40C idle and low 50Cs on load?Might be lower since that is an athlon with no l3 cache(don't worry about the cache it doesn't make much of a difference).


hey
thanks for the reply...

this pentium i have got is quick, my laptop is a core2duo t7200 with 2gb ram, and the pentium 4 is so much quicker (but on ubuntu, this core2duo is faster compared to xp).

i am not planning on playing games, just the odd time when i play football manager 2009 or stick cricket. i do watch youtube hd quite a lot tho...

do you reckon that the athlon will be quicker than the pentium in single threaded applications? like firefox for example ;) 

thanks
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April 25, 2010 4:26:26 PM

mrinal_26 said:

I was wondering if my new system will be faster/powerful than my old system (It best be, I have splashed out a lot of my savings on it, haha)
Mrinal

Yes, it would.

mrinal_26 said:

Also, would the difference be tangible? The new system will be running Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit and the old system runs Windows XP Home 32bit if that makes any difference.

Yes. Best way to know how much difference is to run benchmarks on each. Examples are:
1. SuperPi - the faster the PC, the shorter time this application will finish calculating PI to the nth digit ( depending on what you specify ). Just make sure that cool & quiet is disable.
2. Cinebench
3. PCMark05
and a lot more.

mrinal_26 said:

Also, what sort of temperatures would the new system be running at? My current desktop runs at 52 C at idle (this is the CPU temp) and about 65 at full load.

Temperature depends on a lot of things like your cooler, your casing and your ambient room temperature. Best way to know is to install the same temperature monitoring program you have in your old PC to the new one and see the temperature yourself.

mrinal_26 said:

Sorry about all these questions, I am just goddamn excited about my new system :) 

You should be excited indeed. You got a great new PC there. A little overkill on the RAM I would say.

mrinal_26 said:

Thanks for your time
Regards,
Mrinal

You're welcome.
April 25, 2010 4:28:45 PM

I built a computer with an AMD Athlon II X2 620 and overclocked it too 3.12GHz. It was blazing before and after overclock, and the great thing about any AMD processor is that you will be able to swap it out for something better if you feel you need more power. At first glance your old computer has a higher clock speed but, architecture is what counts! Plus, hard drives are so much faster nowadays and they are generally silent. Each core of that computer is so efficient in fact mine when under load, will start to use a hill pattern to spread out the work evenly between processors. Thats keeps the processor cool and fast.

Don't question it when it comes you will be impressed. :D 
April 25, 2010 4:28:51 PM

randomkid said:
Yes, it would.


Yes. Best way to know how much difference is to run benchmarks on each. Examples are:
1. SuperPi - the faster the PC, the shorter time this application will finish calculating PI to the nth digit ( depending on what you specify ). Just make sure that cool & quiet is disable.
2. Cinebench
3. PCMark05
and a lot more.


Temperature depends on a lot of things like your cooler, your casing and your ambient room temperature. Best way to know is to install the same temperature monitoring program you have in your old PC to the new one and see the temperature yourself.


You should be excited indeed. You got a great new PC there. A little overkill on the RAM I would say.


You're welcome.


thanks for the brilliant reply - i will do those once i receive the system =)
p.s. dell didnt give me an option to change the ram, plus, more ram can't hurt can it ;)  lol

regards
April 25, 2010 4:31:15 PM

nugentcj said:
I built a computer with an AMD Athlon II X2 620 and overclocked it too 3.12GHz. It was blazing before and after overclock, and the great thing about any AMD processor is that you will be able to swap it out for something better if you feel you need more power. At first glance your old computer has a higher clock speed but, architecture is what counts! Plus, hard drives are so much faster nowadays and they are generally silent. Each core of that computer is so efficient in fact mine when under load, will start to use a hill pattern to spread out the work evenly between processors. Thats keeps the processor cool and fast.

Don't question it when it comes you will be impressed. :D 


decent overclock by the sounds of it!
lol i dont know much (infact anything) about architechtures and all that or hill patterns for that matter lol
all i care about is that the thing should be q.u.i.c.k lol

any chance you could give me a few pointers to learn about the architechtures? (apart from wikipedia that is, thats well complicated lol)
cheers
regards
!