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Raid array 0

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February 18, 2010 1:26:42 PM

How would I install & Configure a new Raid 0 upgrade using two 150 GB Velociraptors without losing any information on my previous Hard Drives(that would only be used for storage while the new Velociraptors would house the OS). I am making more room and would like to switch to Raid o. My components are: Asus Rampage II Extreme mobo, a Core i7 965 3.2 Ghz Cpu, (2) New Velociraptor 10,000 rpm 150 GB Hard Drives, (2) 1TB WD 7500 rpm Hard Drives that are close to capacity, 12 gb G.skill 1600 mhz RAM, Quadro FX 5800 GPU, DD Liquid cooling system and the OS is Win Vista 64 Bit. Any help would be truly amazing! I am trying to better my Rendering system as this build is the server for a Net render system using Boxx 10300 Render nodes as the clients

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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
February 18, 2010 3:58:56 PM

You can't. RAID requires you to start with either fresh drives or completely reformated ones. Keep in mind that using RAID 0 DOUBLES the chance of losing everything...
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 18, 2010 4:12:16 PM

Just to be clear, it sounds like you are talking about taking 2 new VRs and creating a RAID 0 container using the 2 VRs. The 2 older disks will remain as is, and won't be used in RAID.

If the above is true, you need to boot into the BIOS and set up the RAID container there. Check your motherboard manual for how to do this. Assuming you then select the correct (new) drives to create the RAID container, you won't affect the existing drives. You might want to back up your data just in case.

If the VRs have data on them, save it off somewhere else before creating the RAID container. As MadAdmiral points out, creating a RAID array destroys the information on the disks.

And again, as MadAdmiral mentions, RAID 0 increases your read/write speeds, but it also increases the chance of failure. If one of the drives goes, the whole RAID 0 array is toast. Make sure that you take backups of anything on the drives, and ideally, take an image of the OS so that you can reinstall it more quickly if anything goes wrong.
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