3570k. If I overclock it, changes standard or boost frequency?

I want to overclock my 3570k, but I've always wondered about a thing.
As you know, my CPU has 3.4 GHz as standard frequency, that boost to 3.8 GHz if system need more power.
So, if I overclock my CPU, what frequency I can change? The standard or the boost one?
If I overclock until 4GHz, then the standard remain 3.4GHz or I can change also the standard frequency?
4 answers Last reply
More about 3570k overclock standard boost frequency
  1. Depends how you overclock. If you change the turbo frequencies then it will be at 3.4 until it needs more power at which point it goes to your overclocked frequency. You can also change the standard frequency if you really want to.
  2. dont overvolt an ivy bridge. there's a few others on these forums reporting fried cpu's from doing it. Ivy uses a 3d transistor architecture so overvolting is not reccomended.
  3. Rich_ said:
    dont overvolt an ivy bridge. there's a few others on these forums reporting fried cpu's from doing it. Ivy uses a 3d transistor architecture so overvolting is not reccomended.


    How can I overclock the cpu without overvolting it?
    I made these changes for a very lite overclock:

    Offset mode
    All Core=40
    Additional Turbo Voltage: +0.004v
    Offset Voltage: +0.005v
    Enhanced Halt State (C1E): Enabled
    CPU C3 State Support: Disabled
    CPU C6 State Support: Disabled
    Package C State Support: Disabled
  4. I'm pretty sure the Ivy is setup like the Sandy in the turbo department. The way my 2600k turbo works stock is like this if I'm correct.

    3.5Ghz on 3 cores.
    3.6Ghz on 2 cores.
    3.8Ghz on 1 core.

    When you overclock, I believe it pretty much disables turbo frequencies anyways. I disabled the turbo on mine either way as I only wanted speedstep and the ability to run at 1600mhz with ~0.8v while idling to save power.

    These newer styles of CPU's have a variable voltage rating. Where the idle voltage and full load voltage can vary. Personally my SB idles at about 0.892v and full loads have reached 1.252v running at an offset of -0.300v. The offset causes the motherboard to run that much under what the processor basically is requesting through it's VID(?). Each processor wants different voltages and I find myself lucky that I can run the -.300v at 4Ghz. The days of the fixed voltage are gone and there isn't much information on a "predetermined" stock voltage on the processors. I'm not really familiar with the Ivy bridge versions yet, but I know the SB 2500/2600 series runs between 1-1.35v on average at stock settings.

    I'd really start some in depth reading about your processor and learn about the different ways to overclock. You may just be lucky and have a processor that will take low voltage for a decent overclock. Personally, at my settings IntelBurnTest doesn't get my 2600k over 60C with extreme settings and it's mainly because of the low voltage the processor takes with the lowered offset.
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