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IGP

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Last response: in Motherboards
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 6:30:33 AM

Hi!
I know what an IGP is but I don't know where it is situated. It's another function of the northbridge isn't it? Or is it a separate thing situated away from the chipset?

I have one more doubt.

If I choose a motherboard with a higher FSB than my cpu, will it affect the overall performance of the system?
Thanks

More about : igp

a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 1:41:16 PM

Depending on the platform, the IGP can either be combined with the northbridge as you stated, or in the case of the Core i3s and i5s and Atom (Pineview), it can be housed with the cpu. If you need more info, tell us what you have and we can tell you more.

Choosing a mobo with a higher supported FSB will not affect the system performance, but it could give you more headroom if you ever choose to OC. In general, though, just make sure your mobo supports your cpu (check the manufacturers website) and you should be good to go.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 5:21:01 PM

Thanks a lot for the spicy answer pepperman. I have a c2d on a Gigabyte mobo and I do have plans for OC. Those core series processors come with graphic controllers right? so those 1156 mobos don't have gpus?





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a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 7:26:09 PM

Correct; the Core i3s and i5s (not including the i5 750/60--those cpus don't have an IGP) have the IGP housed within the cpu, so all the 1156 board has to do is link the output to a VGA or DVI/HDMI port on the mobo.
If you plan on gaming, however, I highly recommend a discrete card, as even newer IGPs are not meant for that.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 7:44:04 PM

Quote:
so all the 1156 board has to do is link the output to a VGA or DVI/HDMI port on the mobo


OK. So do these boards still come with a northbridgeheatsink?

Quote:
If you plan on gaming, however, I highly recommend a discrete card, as even newer IGPs are not meant for that.


I edit photos & videos frequently. So I think I'll need a good gxcard. But I doubt the processing power of the c2d.

a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 10:13:45 PM

Those boards still come with a northbridge heatsink, as they still provide the rest of the features a northbridge does (i.e. linking the cpu to the PCIE graphic lanes and linking the cpu to the southbridge).

Which Core 2 Duo do you have (i.e. what speed)? Also, what is your mobo (model number)? You might be able to upgrade to a Core 2 Quad, which will help a lot with rendering/encoding time.

Alternatively, if you want to rebuild your entire system (or just the guts), you could post a new thread in the new systems section and follow this guide when opening the thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advic...
a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 2:20:20 AM

pepperman said:
Those boards still come with a northbridge heatsink, as they still provide the rest of the features a northbridge does (i.e. linking the cpu to the PCIE graphic lanes and linking the cpu to the southbridge).

Which Core 2 Duo do you have (i.e. what speed)? Also, what is your mobo (model number)? You might be able to upgrade to a Core 2 Quad, which will help a lot with rendering/encoding time.

Alternatively, if you want to rebuild your entire system (or just the guts), you could post a new thread in the new systems section and follow this guide when opening the thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advic...


No, 1156 has the primary PCIe controller on the CPU as well. The P55/H55/etc PCH's are actually southbridges by the traditional definition, having similar function to the ICH10/ICH10R.
a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 3:26:18 AM

Sorry, my mistake; Crashman is correct. There technically isn't a northbridge for 1156 mobos by conventional standards (if you look on a 1156 mobo, you'll only notice one heatsink), since the memory and graphics are managed directly by the cpu.
a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 4:06:00 AM

pepperman said:
Sorry, my mistake; Crashman is correct. There technically isn't a northbridge for 1156 mobos by conventional standards (if you look on a 1156 mobo, you'll only notice one heatsink), since the memory and graphics are managed directly by the cpu.


Well, I think the IGP CPU's have the PCIe controller on the graphics chip, which is a separate chip on the same package (45nm for the IGP, 32nm for the CPU). So technically I guess you could call that the Northbridge, except that same explanation wouldn't work for the i5-7xx and i7-8xx chips that have no IGP and have PCIe on the same die as the core/uncore.../ugh.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 6:50:54 AM

Thanks...
I have an E7500 on a Gigabyte P45 USB 3.0 DDR 3 (GA-EP45T-USB3P) mobo with 4 gigs of RAM. Will it be enough? I haven't purchased a gxcard yet. Any suggestions?


a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 7:02:40 AM

For editing photos and videos? It should be fine. Depending on the software, you might get better performance out of a quad, but you'd need to spend upwards of $150 to get one that would actually be an upgrade.

What do you plan on doing/using your graphics card for (i.e. gaming, a certain program, etc.)?
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 7:42:13 AM

Photoshop and Dreamweaver might work fine. But how will Premiere work under this hardware?
I haven't tried any of these software on this machine because there's no gxcard. But I now have a lot of projects. So I work for about 12 hrs a day. I cant stay in the office for more than 8 hours. This is not an old machine. So... I cant throw it away either.
This is the situation. I think a good graphics card can make all the difference. What do you think?
a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 8:29:06 PM

Your machine should run it fine; Core 2's are still relevant.

In terms of the graphics card, you should look at this list and see if any of the cards listed there fall into your price range, as premiere pro can use them for GPU acceleration (for a list of supported gpus, see here: http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/systemreqs/ ).

If those are too expensive for you, you'll still get some GPU acceleration (depending on the program you're working in) from most any modern gpu on the market. If you want a specific suggestion, let us know your price range and psu info.
a b V Motherboard
October 6, 2010 1:16:34 PM

Stay away from the GTX 465s; they consume more heat, yet tend to perform slower than the GTX 460.

That said, the 460 is a good card to look at. Personally, I wouldn't spend $30 more on a factory OCed card over a standard card, and I would look at this one instead of the EVGA (its $30 cheaper, and it has a better cooling design):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Edit: That's not a Zotac, its an EVGA
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 6, 2010 2:19:18 PM

thanks for the help. So I've decided to go for the GV-N460OC-1GI. I think there's no point in going for an even more expensive card for this core 2 duo.
a b V Motherboard
October 6, 2010 7:27:20 PM

You're probably right; the good news is you might be able to carry the graphics card over to your next build (depending, of course, on how long your current build lasts you). You can always OC your CPU, which would give you some extra performance and more useful life from the machine (google OCing Core 2 Duo for guides, or check some of Tom's guides).