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MSATA SSD vs SATA SSD

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March 1, 2012 2:56:26 PM

Hi,
I need help figuring out what's a better buy in terms of speed. I have two options:

1. OCZ NOC-MSATA-30G 30GB mSATA Nocti-SATA II Solid State Drive
specs:
Max Read: up to 280 MB/s
Max Write: up to 255 MB/s
Random Write 4k: 12,500 IOPS

in this case I will use it for SRT caching

2. OCZ Petrol SATA III 2,5'' SSD - 64GB
specs:
Max Read: up to 185MB/s
Max Write: up to 95MB/s
Random Write 4KB: 7,800 IOPS
Random Read 4KB: 23,000 IOPS

in this case I will install the OS and most important apps on it

More about : msata ssd sata ssd

a c 283 G Storage
March 1, 2012 3:11:39 PM

What type of pc system do you have? Is it a desktop pc or something small like a netbook that requires an mSATA drive which is smaller than a standard drive?

Here is a link to the ssd database:

http://www.johnnylucky.org/data-storage/ssd-database.ht...

Scroll down to the OCZ section. You'll find links to several technical reviews of the OCZ Nocti mSATA ssd. Unfortunately there don't seem to be any technical reviews for the OCZ Petrol ssd which has an Indilinx Everest Controller. OCZ classified the Petrol as a value drive.
a b G Storage
March 1, 2012 3:14:26 PM

First off why do you want to use SRT? IMO it's better to go with 1 bigger SSD than 2 smaller ones.

SRT takes about 4-5 program uses to start "accelerating" programs. Plus it cannot accelerate things like compressed files (videos, music, anything already compressed).

Whereas having 1 larger SSD - it's always "on" giving 100% speed unlike SRT.

MSATA's are meant for netbooks - or laptops with very small space requirements. As such they perform much slower than a regular SATA SSD drive. Plus not all computers/laptops support MSATA.
Related resources
March 1, 2012 3:14:41 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
What type of pc system do you have? Is it a desktop pc or something small like a netbook that requires an mSATA drive which is smaller than a standard drive?

Here is a link to the ssd database:

http://www.johnnylucky.org/data-storage/ssd-database.ht...

Scroll down to the OCZ section. You'll find links to several technical reviews of the OCZ Nocti mSATA ssd. Unfortunately there don't seem to be any technical reviews for the OCZ Petrol ssd which has an Indilinx Everest Controller. OCZ classified the Petrol as a value drive.


I have a desktop. my mobo has mSATA slot. here is my specs:
Corsair 8GB (KIT) DDR3 1600MHz/CL9/VENGEANCE
Corsair TX 650W V2 /80+ Bronze
Gigabyte GA-Z68P-DS3 - LGA1155
IntelĀ® Core i5 2500K, 3.3GHz, 6MB
March 1, 2012 3:22:53 PM

Chainzsaw said:
First off why do you want to use SRT? IMO it's better to go with 1 bigger SSD than 2 smaller ones.

SRT takes about 4-5 program uses to start "accelerating" programs. Plus it cannot accelerate things like compressed files (videos, music, anything already compressed).

Whereas having 1 larger SSD - it's always "on" giving 100% speed unlike SRT.

MSATA's are meant for netbooks - or laptops with very small space requirements. As such they perform much slower than a regular SATA SSD drive. Plus not all computers/laptops support MSATA.


In my case I have a desktop which has an option to install mSATA.
Are mSATA drivers better ? at least according to the numbers it seems to me they are... but correct me if I'm wrong
a b G Storage
March 1, 2012 3:28:16 PM

Like what Johnny said - the petrol you're comparing to the mSATA is a value based SSD. So that's why the mSATA appears to have "better numbers".

Also the driver's aren't better for mSATA- it's what's in the SSD itself that determines the capability of the SSD drive (the controller and the firmware).

If you look at a crucial M4 - 128GB it would stomp both of those SSD's you listed.

Crucial M4 CT128M4SSD1 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC 7mm Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)


Sustained Sequential Read: Up to 500 MB/s (SATA 6Gb/s)
Sustained Sequential Write: Up to 175 MB/s (SATA 6Gb/s)
4KB Random Read: Up to 45,000 IOPS
4KB Random Write: Up to 35,000 IOPS
March 1, 2012 3:34:56 PM

yea it does but it also costs a lot more :) 
i found the petrol on a discount for 70 euros, original price is 90 euros
where the msata is about 65 euros
and thats currently my budget :) 
a b G Storage
March 1, 2012 3:41:33 PM

ndsinister said:
yea it does but it also costs a lot more :) 
i found the petrol on a discount for 70 euros, original price is 90 euros
where the msata is about 65 euros
and thats currently my budget :) 


It would have been nice if you mentioned a budget in your original message.

Anyways - I would go for the Petrol - even though it's "only" 64GB and has less speed than the MSATA drive you listed - it will still be much faster than a HDD. Plus you get double the amount of space for only 5$ more...

Unless someone reccomends something else.
March 1, 2012 3:47:09 PM

yea sorry, I should have specified my budget...
I guess the petrol would perform better than the nocti with SRT
I think 64gb are enough for OS + most important apps and one game :) 
where the msata wouldnt allot my any games on it cuz of its size so i would have to use it as SRT
thanks for your opinions!
a c 283 G Storage
March 1, 2012 6:44:12 PM

OOPS! I missed the part about SRT

It's been a while since someone has asked about Intel Smart Response technology. Here is my standard answer:

Intel's SRT caching technology was designed for buyers who could not justify or afford the cost of a larger capacity solid-state drive. According to Intel, the original idea was that for about $100.00 a user could purchase a small capacity ssd of about 10 to 20GB and use it as a cache to improve hard disk drive performance. The Operating system and programs were actually stored on a hard disk drive. The actual improvement could not compare to a stand alone ssd. Intel also looked at different capacities all the way up to 512GB and concluded 64GB was the point of diminishing return. It made more sense to use a 64GB ssd as a boot drive that also contained software programs. Intel was hoping that if business clients saw an increase in performance, then they would be induced to purchase larger capacity ssd's that promised an even greater boost in performance.

A lot has changed sinced then, especially prices. For $100.00 you can definitely purchase an ssd that is much larger than 20GB. Might as well take full advantage of ssd performance.



March 25, 2014 12:49:39 PM

Chainzsaw said:
First off why do you want to use SRT? IMO it's better to go with 1 bigger SSD than 2 smaller ones.

SRT takes about 4-5 program uses to start "accelerating" programs. Plus it cannot accelerate things like compressed files (videos, music, anything already compressed).

Whereas having 1 larger SSD - it's always "on" giving 100% speed unlike SRT.

MSATA's are meant for netbooks - or laptops with very small space requirements. As such they perform much slower than a regular SATA SSD drive. Plus not all computers/laptops support MSATA.


what the hell ar u taklin bout ??? msata is slower than normal sata ??? ar u crazy??? mSATA is much faster better it is like PCI
March 25, 2014 12:49:39 PM

Chainzsaw said:
First off why do you want to use SRT? IMO it's better to go with 1 bigger SSD than 2 smaller ones.

SRT takes about 4-5 program uses to start "accelerating" programs. Plus it cannot accelerate things like compressed files (videos, music, anything already compressed).

Whereas having 1 larger SSD - it's always "on" giving 100% speed unlike SRT.

MSATA's are meant for netbooks - or laptops with very small space requirements. As such they perform much slower than a regular SATA SSD drive. Plus not all computers/laptops support MSATA.


what the hell ar u taklin bout ??? msata is slower than normal sata ??? ar u crazy??? mSATA is much faster better it is like PCI
July 12, 2014 2:39:29 AM

Chainzsaw said:
First off why do you want to use SRT? IMO it's better to go with 1 bigger SSD than 2 smaller ones.

SRT takes about 4-5 program uses to start "accelerating" programs. Plus it cannot accelerate things like compressed files (videos, music, anything already compressed).

Whereas having 1 larger SSD - it's always "on" giving 100% speed unlike SRT.

MSATA's are meant for netbooks - or laptops with very small space requirements. As such they perform much slower than a regular SATA SSD drive. Plus not all computers/laptops support MSATA.


July 12, 2014 3:18:04 AM

That incorrect info " MSATA's are meant for netbooks - or laptops with very small space requirements. As such they perform much slower than a regular SATA SSD drive. Plus not all computers/laptops support MSATA " .

I have a 9 year old HP Pavilion DV4040US laptop Centrino M processor, 2gb Ram, Windows 8.1 Pro Edition and Samsung mSATA 840 EVO 120GB SSD. Turns on in less than 6 seconds and runs every app and programs extremely fast perhaps faster than new laptops. I simply replaced my spinning HD with 2.5" IDE mSATA Addonics bracket (placed mSATA HD inside bracket). I will follow up with replacing my DVD drive with 1TB mSATA SSD.

Don't give out unwarranted un-researched and thoughtless opinions (without facts to back up your statements) to this site. Some people like myself will take information on this site like the bible and utilize it to the fullest extent.

P.S No disrespect intended!
!