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OC'ing my 3770k

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December 5, 2012 7:11:34 PM

Hello guys, i am new to this forum and also new to over-clocking.
I recently bought / build (with a friend) my new pc. I talked me into buying the 3770k over the 3770 since it has alot more potential for OC'ing (and it was 20 bucks more).

But, i am totally new to this.

I run a 3770k and a Asus Z77 Pro 4 motherboard under it. (on Air cooled)
Are there people who run this setup (or something familiar) and can help me get started?

Like, what programs to use to OC, how to OC, etc etc. My processor is 3,5 ghz with single core boost towards 3,9 ghz at the moment. Since i am new to this i don't want to go over the top and start simple, so my aim is 4 / 4,2 ghz. (for all cores of course).

If i can get 4,2 stable with not to much voltage (would be really happy with standard voltage, read it was possible for 4,2) i will stay there. No need for me to go higher.

More about : ing 3770k

December 5, 2012 7:20:52 PM

Can somebody also tell me like when will my 3770k use the turbo mode to 3,9 ghz?
December 5, 2012 7:34:28 PM

Use CPUZ, HWMonitor, and prime95.

I have the same motherboard and CPU but I have liquid cooling.

You can begin by going into the BIOS and chaging the multiplier to 42 for 4.2GHz. I believe you do not need to change the voltage at all to reach 4.2GHz. Boot up open HWMonitor and start running Prime95, watch your CPU temps, anything around 80C is fine for ivy bridge. If it is unstable then you need to up the voltage a bit.

If you want more... Try changing the multiplier in the bios to x45 and the vcore to 1.2v.

Thats about as far as you can go with air cooling.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2012 7:37:47 PM

KiraKrysis said:
Use CPUZ, HWMonitor, and prime95.

I have the same motherboard and CPU but I have liquid cooling.

You can begin by going into the BIOS and chaging the multiplier to 42 for 4.2GHz. I believe you do not need to change the voltage at all to reach 4.2GHz. Boot up open HWMonitor and start running Prime95, watch your CPU temps, anything around 80C is fine for ivy bridge. If it is unstable then you need to up the voltage a bit.

If you want more... Try changing the multiplier in the bios to x45 and the vcore to 1.2v.

Thats about as far as you can go with air cooling.


Totally untrue.

My 3570k runs 4.9ghz @ 1.3v 75-85C after 5 hours of battlefield 3 online.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2012 7:51:54 PM

Quote:
Totally untrue.

My 3570k runs 4.9ghz @ 1.3v 75-85C after 5 hours of battlefield 3 online.
:o  screen shot please ?
December 5, 2012 7:52:46 PM

4,9 ghz is quite impressive. But since i only own my new rig like 5/6 weeks i don't want to take i past 4,2 ghz. it gives me a stable 0,7 ghz improve and i don't think i need more. Not running multiple monitor or anything crazy. And i want it to last ;p (maby when i get more into pc hardware i will start some shenanigans). But thank you for the start up information.

Should i do anything with the turbo multiplier? Since if it kicks in when i OC'd it will actually drop my ghz on 1 core. Disable it or something? (When does it activate, can you do it manually)?
Anonymous
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a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2012 7:56:41 PM

Sorry my bad, 4.9 ghz @ 1.35V
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2012 7:58:34 PM

Quote:
Sorry my bad, 4.9 ghz @ 1.35V
Screen shot i do not believe it make me a believer :lol: 
December 5, 2012 9:52:00 PM

To try and answer the second part of your question (and I am new to this also so caveat emptor), I will give you my experience. I just bought a 3770k also and it is stable OC at 4.2 (don't think I'll mess with much higher, no real point for my needs, maybe 4.4).

Just go to BIOS on start up, find the CPU multiplier and change it to 42X. Then, find voltage (Vcore) and up it to ~1.12, mine is at 1.152. That's it.

Here is a good guide: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/279408-29-bridge-over...
December 6, 2012 11:02:04 AM

Quote:
Totally untrue.

My 3570k runs 4.9ghz @ 1.3v 75-85C after 5 hours of battlefield 3 online.


BTW the 3770k runs hotter.
a c 159 à CPUs
a c 286 K Overclocking
December 6, 2012 8:48:40 PM

Before give you some advice I need to ask...

What cooler do you have? Because if you are thinking in overclock that CPU with stock cooler I suggest your don't do it.
December 9, 2012 6:46:25 PM

My cooler is a Scythe Mugen 3 Rev. B.
And i got quite some fans in my pc for good airflow.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2012 8:10:53 PM

Overclocking is easy on that chip. The K series makes overclocking simple and easy. Sandy and Ivy bridge CPU's are extremely similar in the overclocking game so I'll give you my rundown of how I would clock your processor.

First, set it to stock everything, do some stress tests such as memtest386+ for ram, IntelBurnTest for thermals, and Prime95 for stability. Record your temperatures and voltages (on automatic it should vary between load amounts but it should give you a good idea of where to start.)

Now, once you have those you can start upping the multiplier on through the BIOS. If your usual voltage is say 1.1v, not the max voltage either, start with that and see if it boots into windows at 4Ghz by changing the multiplier to 40x. 4Ghz isn't that much of a jump for that processor so give it a shot. If it doesn't boot, try 3.8Ghz at 38x and see if you get into windows.

I like to do my voltage testing within windows with my motherboards tuner to find that sweet spot. I usually run IntelBurnTest first for stability. If the results don't match; processor failed the math somewhere and there's instability. Now remember, IBT will heat your processor up hotter than anything else possibly can. Even Prime95 won't take the processor to those heat ratings. So if you hit 80C with IBT, prime 95 on blend usually will hit 70C.

Now, work with small steps. Another method is to slowly up the multiplier which can be done with many different software applications right within windows. Slowly jump it up at your stock fixed voltage. The reason I suggest setting a fixed voltage is automatic causes the chip to control the voltage. My older 2600k at 4Ghz will pull over 1.3v with automatic voltage which can keep my processor stable at 4.5Ghz with fixed voltage. So Fixed voltage keeps a ton of variables out of play so you don't have to worry about them for the time being or at all if you don't want the processor voltage to drop during idle along with the clock.

If it were me, I'd probably set the voltage at about 1.150v and start with 3.8Ghz and see if it is stable with a normal 10-pass test of IntelBurnTest. If it passes, I'd drop an extra spot onto the multiplier to 3.9Ghz and test again, just incrementally until I found an instability. Instability can be as simple as a math error with mismatched results on IBT or a blue screen. Remember to watch the temperatures like a hawk during the tests as IBT will make that CPU heat to the max.

Now, say you find 4.3Ghz is unstable, I'd go into the BIOS and set the multiplier of 42x and go from there and make sure that's stable. Run Prime95 on Blend for a few hours. If it passes on all of the workers; then you're pretty dang stable. I consider a machine that passes a 24 hour Prime 95 Blend test to be as stable as it can be.

Remember, baby steps. That's the key. Learn and read about each option you have way before you make any changes. Things such as LoadLine Calibration, PLL Voltages, and even Offset voltages can be very confusing. So before you even begin to tinker with these; I'd read them until you know exactly what they do and how they will be helpful or harmful to you.

One last note, be meticulous with your settings... Triple check settings before you apply. If you accidentally set the voltage to +0.500v instead of say +0.050v; you can kiss that processor goodbye in a flash. So be careful and remember, this is going to be a learning experience. But the experience will be something great once you see just how well today's processors can do beyond what they are set as for stock settings!
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