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Tried switching from IDE to RAID in BIOS

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  • NAS / RAID
  • BIOS
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
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March 3, 2012 12:46:15 PM

I tried using "Peregrinus' Hack" to switch from IDE to RAID mode in BIOS after Windows 7 was installed.

Unfortunately my registry is now corrupt.

If I can find a copy of windows\system32\config\system and copy it onto the drives might that fix my problem?

Before I tried this BIOS was set to IDE mode and using nvidia software I had a RAID 1 array.

More about : switching ide raid bios

March 3, 2012 1:41:19 PM



I'm not able to get into Windows on the drives with the problem.

Can I boot with the Ultimate Boot CD (Windows XP) and run the Fix It if I can connect to the Internet? )I'm trying to get onto the Internet but haven't figured it out yet.)

Am I correct that if I can run the Fix It then I need to change to AHCI or RAID in BIOS as I am rebooting the system?

I currently have a software RAID1 array. (nvidia software)

Alternatively, can I pull the drives out and attach them to another system and run the Fix It and direct it to repair those drives not the one in the system they are attached to?

Or, am I just plain screwed and need to do a clean install of Windows 7 (with AHCI set in my BIOS) and reinstall all my applications? (and hopefully recover all the data off the secondary drive from the RAID 1 array)
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March 3, 2012 2:36:52 PM

I did try copying the file from my laptop to one hard drive and that didn't work. Now I'm trying to copy it to the second drive.

Still trying to figure out how to connect to the Internet while booted from the CD in XP.
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a c 119 G Storage
March 3, 2012 3:01:15 PM

It would seem like the best solution is to clean the drives and start over. The main question is, are there a lot of important files that would be lost? I'm just adding up the time spent on trying to repair vs a new install and looking for any files or programs that were lost and need replacing. Or if any of the data is not replacable.
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March 3, 2012 3:12:29 PM

No restore disc? That's where your old registry would be.
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March 3, 2012 3:25:11 PM

Thanks for all the help.

No, I did not make a restore disc. I thought I had it covered with RAID 1 (for the OS and applications) and Carbonite for the data, so I never ran a back up to the external hard drive that I use to back up my other systems. Of course, I am in the process of reorganizing my network to make back ups easier and that would have been done next. I guess I should have done that first but the external enclosure hadn't arrived so I started with the add more hard drives project first which led to this mess.

I could try using a restore disc from another system that I have but that might make matters worse. Any thoughts?

I have been copying the files over from a good system to the bad one and when I try to boot it tells me a different file is corrupt so maybe that is progress.

I probably wouldn't lose files since I could simply create a new OS disk and then add the damaged disks back to the system and access the data. But I would have to reinstall all my apps and retweak my settings.
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a c 119 G Storage
March 3, 2012 3:33:07 PM

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk

I'm not sure if this will help in the recovery process but it is free and you can give it a shot if you think you need some help in recovering files.
The using a restore disc from another system might work if it's the exact same version and I do mean "exact" because when dealing with computers there is no room for "almost the same".
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March 4, 2012 11:54:43 AM

I did get the system up with one of the recycled drives. I set the SATA mode to AHCI before I installed Windows 7.

I plugged one of the old mirror drives in and can see the System Reserved partition (Healthy, Active, Primary) and the other partition (Healthy, Primary). I can't access that larger other partition which has the corrupted registry and my data/media on it.

I am trying to figure out how to "activate" that partition so I can see the files. I'm not sure if I should just set it to Active. I can't seem to find anything that tells me if switching it to Active will harm the data or confuse the system during boot.
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March 4, 2012 12:13:09 PM

IMO,

Put it back in IDE
boot off Ultimatebootcd or anything similar
Verify if you see you important data
Copy it to another drive
Restart from scratch

If i understand you correctly, you were ruuning already running a raid and are now switching to your motherboard raid... Boot sectors will be screwed, etc
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March 4, 2012 5:14:27 PM

Well the other drive from the RAID 1 array showed up and I was able to access the files. Could that have been the original "primary" drive in the array?

I'm copying my User folder over to my external back up drive. Then I'm going to delete the user folder from the old RAID drive, copy the System 32 folder from the new C drive onto that drive and give it a shot at booting from it.

If that doesn't work I'll just give it up and reinstall all my applications. What a pain. Oh well. First thing I do once I get the system back up with the OS and applications is make a back up that I can restore from.

Then days of tweaking applications and folders. I'll be using the system as a combination NAS, HTPC and media server for our home network. I'm guessing as soon as I get it the way I want it, it will be time to upgrade to Windows 8 and computing in the Cloud. It wouldn't be a hobby if you were ever done.
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a c 119 G Storage
March 4, 2012 5:19:19 PM

BlueCat57 said:
I did get the system up with one of the recycled drives. I set the SATA mode to AHCI before I installed Windows 7.

I plugged one of the old mirror drives in and can see the System Reserved partition (Healthy, Active, Primary) and the other partition (Healthy, Primary). I can't access that larger other partition which has the corrupted registry and my data/media on it.

I am trying to figure out how to "activate" that partition so I can see the files. I'm not sure if I should just set it to Active. I can't seem to find anything that tells me if switching it to Active will harm the data or confuse the system during boot.



If you do set a new partition or even format it you can always get your data off it with the free software program that I listed as long as you don't write any new data to the drive. Once you overwrite new data then the old data is lost , when you format the drive you are not erasinf any of the data what is happening is that Windows is setting the drive up so that you can write new data over the old data. Untill you do a format you can't write over old data so in this case even if you activate a new partition and format it as long as you don't write new data you can still recover the old files.
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March 5, 2012 3:25:00 PM

I'm still working on this issue but wanted to add a thing or two that I've learned.

1. I created a new boot drive. That was easy enough.
2. A full format takes a long time.
3. Plug your boot drive into the lowest numbered SATA connector if you have another drive with boot files on it connected to the system. After I got the new boot drive going (it was plugged into one of the higher numbered connectors) I just plugged the corrupted drives into the available SATA connectors (lower numbered) and the system tried to boot to the corrupted drives and would not allow me to select the good boot drive. Easy enough to fix by switching where the drives are plugged in.
4. After two days of trying to fix the registry I realized that I use CCleaner and that it creates a copy of the registry. In checking around the way you restore that old information is to find the file, right click and select Merge. Pretty easy, except it isn't obvious where it will Merge the information. I'm guessing that it will Merge it into the active registry on the good drive and not into the corrupted registry on the drive that it was created on. Any thoughts?
5. I've pretty much resolved myself to reinstalling everything. Oh well. I really appreciate the help at get at Tom's. Thank you.
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a c 119 G Storage
March 5, 2012 3:35:43 PM

It might be a daunting task if you have a lot of files and stuff ssaved but there is nothing like a format and new install to make the computer like new again. I guess the best way to do this is to have a small to medium sized SSD for just the OS and a game or two , especially those games where your settings are stored in the cloud.
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