Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Help with Antec 300 HDD Install and Screws!

Last response: in Components
Share
April 30, 2010 1:21:06 AM

Hello,
It looks like my 3.5" hard drive with side sliders does not fit in the Antec 300 case... I've tried both front and back. How do you install HDD's into this case, anyway?

Also, which screws are the ones you are supposed to install your motherboard with?
April 30, 2010 1:52:03 AM

I have the same case. Read the manual.
Page 2:
"6. Place he motherboard on the brass standoffs. Screw in the motherboard to the standoffs with the provided phillips-head screws."

There is only one type of Phillips head screws in your kit.

Installing the hard drive instructions are on page 3.

What do you mean by "side sliders"? If they are something on the hard drive itself, take them off. Because the case is designed to fit a hard drive. Not a hard drive with random stuff on it.

Hope that helped. If you need any additional help or clarification, just let me know.
m
0
l
April 30, 2010 3:30:44 AM

hi enzo: the antec 300 came with 3 kinds of screws, all of which have the phillips x on them...

here are some quick shots from my iphone (i've taken the hdd out from my old computer ready to install it in my old build, so sorry for these low-res shots!)

there's the round head phillips:

there's also the hex head phillips:


and there's the thick phillips


there are also the gold standoffs, which i've already put into the case. currently, i am using the thick phillips to secure my motherboard to the standoffs... is that the right one to use?
m
0
l
Related resources
April 30, 2010 3:59:54 AM

Use the "round head" (1st pic) to secure motherboard. The "thick" phillips (3rd pic) is for the hard drives. The "hex" head (2nd pic) can be used for securing pci cards, power supply, cd drives, etc.
m
0
l
April 30, 2010 4:17:59 AM

The other prob was that the screws all fit the same holes, so I ended up using the thick (3rd pic) screws for all - including the motherboard... What are the effects of using different screws? Should I take the thick screws out and replace them with the round on the mobo, etc?
m
0
l
April 30, 2010 4:18:45 AM

Sorry, I don't consider the second two "phillips" lol. I just look at them and go "computer screw" and "thumb screw". But yeah use the round ones.

Did you manage to get the hard drive to fit?
m
0
l
April 30, 2010 4:20:45 AM

Use the round head with washer (1st pic) for mobo installation. The tool-less screw (3rd pic) can be used for drives. As for me, I've replaced the PCI slot cover screw with these to easily remove slots without the use of a screwdriver.
m
0
l
April 30, 2010 4:28:40 AM

enzo matrix said:
Sorry, I don't consider the second two "phillips" lol. I just look at them and go "computer screw" and "thumb screw". But yeah use the round ones.


LOL, I was stumped for a while, and finally just tried screwing each of them on the standoffs to see which one went in the best - and found the thick ones fit snugly:



But, I am reading elsewhere that the thicker heads might short the mobo circuit..

enzo matrix said:
Did you manage to get the hard drive to fit?


Yes - without the side-sliders (photo shown below, green plastic supports on side), the hdd slid in perfectly. Opened up both sides of the 300, and turned the thick-screws in. But... My worry is that since we have metal touching metal - the sides of the hdd touching the computer case, could there be a short?



This is my first case without additional supports for the hdd... It's also the first Antec I've encountered that doesn't have dampening supports like this one from my old Antec Solo:

m
0
l
April 30, 2010 4:43:20 AM

masterjaw said:
Use the round head with washer (1st pic) for mobo installation. The tool-less screw (3rd pic) can be used for drives. As for me, I've replaced the PCI slot cover screw with these to easily remove slots without the use of a screwdriver.


obsolete99 said:
Use the "round head" (1st pic) to secure motherboard. The "thick" phillips (3rd pic) is for the hard drives. The "hex" head (2nd pic) can be used for securing pci cards, power supply, cd drives, etc.


Currently, I've installed the mobo using the thick screws.... everything is in-place. Taking out the thick screws and putting the others in would be a pain, so I'm wondering if it matters which screws to use to put the mobo in (as long as it fits).

The thick screws look like Frankenstein bolts though.. they aren't touching anything, so is there still a danger of shorting the mobo?






m
0
l
April 30, 2010 5:10:16 AM

inac said:
But, I am reading elsewhere that the thicker heads might short the mobo circuit..


Yes - without the side-sliders (photo shown below, green plastic supports on side), the hdd slid in perfectly. Opened up both sides of the 300, and turned the thick-screws in. But... My worry is that since we have metal touching metal - the sides of the hdd touching the computer case, could there be a short?

You won't have a problem if you used the thumbscrews that were for the hard drive because the base that touches the motherboard is the same size as the base that touches the motherboard with the phillips screws.

Nopw. It's just a case for the hard drives internal components. There is no electricity flowing through the exposed metal.
m
0
l
April 30, 2010 5:42:06 AM

enzo matrix said:
You won't have a problem if you used the thumbscrews that were for the hard drive because the base that touches the motherboard is the same size as the base that touches the motherboard with the phillips screws.


For the mobo: I ended up unscrewing the thick screws and replacing them with the round screws. Had to unplug the 8x power and graphics card to get to some of the holes. Overall, the smaller (round) screws are a pain to work with since they keep on falling into the mobo, especially when they slip. After install, did a 180 degree turn to make sure I didn't miss any loose screw debris.

enzo matrix said:
Nopw. It's just a case for the hard drives internal components. There is no electricity flowing through the exposed metal.


There is always the "beware of static electric shock" or something like that on the bag that wraps the hdd, so I assume even the hdd case is prone to shock.. If it's just a Faraday cage, then it doesn't matter if the hdd's left out in the middle of an electric thunder storm? :pt1cable: 
m
0
l
June 21, 2010 4:37:02 PM

Pardon me for jumping on this a bit late, but I've also got an Antec 300, and I'm using a 3.5" HDD (just like most people)

First off, you mentioned that you aren't using the larger philips screws (the ones with the big fat ends that you can tighten by hand) to secure the motherboard to the spacers. I chose to use these because you don't need to be fiddling around near to your motherboard with a screwdriver. This isn't really a problem since it's turned off, so you won't damage anything either way, unless you're really clumsy that is.

Also keep in mind that it would be a horrible design practice to put sensitive electronics near to the mounting holes on a motherboard. All motherboards should have a small amount of clearance around mounting holes such that there is virtually no risk of "shorting".

There is always the "beware of static electric shock" or something like that on the bag that wraps the hdd, so I assume even the hdd case is prone to shock.. If it's just a Faraday cage, then it doesn't matter if the hdd's left out in the middle of an electric thunder storm? :pt1cable: said:
There is always the "beware of static electric shock" or something like that on the bag that wraps the hdd, so I assume even the hdd case is prone to shock.. If it's just a Faraday cage, then it doesn't matter if the hdd's left out in the middle of an electric thunder storm? :pt1cable: 


There is very little, if any risk to the HDDs in an Antec 300 from ESD, despite the fact that the metal sides of the HDDs are in contact with the metal case. Keep in mind that if your PSU is plugged in, the whole thing is grounded.

I've seen better hard drive mounting systems, but I've yet to be convinced that they are worth it, unless you plan to move your computer around a lot, in which case it might be better to get a different case or use a 3.5"-5.25" adapter with rubber padding, or similar.

Finally, the sensitive electronics in a HDD are isolated from the outer casing. If you refrain from touching the PCB (if not grounded), secure the hard drive well and connect it properly (power & sata), then you shouldn't have any problems.
m
0
l
July 11, 2010 5:16:31 PM

obsolete99 said:
Use the "round head" (1st pic) to secure motherboard. The "thick" Phillips (3rd pic) is for the hard drives. The "hex" head (2nd pic) can be used for securing pci cards, power supply, cd drives, etc.



Yup. This is correct.

Instruction manuals are good at assuming (which kinda sucks) you know that in the baggie that includes the additional brass standoffs for supporting the motherboard, there are two choices, and only one is the referred to 'Phillips head screws'. The other is the combo Phillips/hex-head that can be secured with either a Phillips screwdriver, or a nut driver/ratchet & socket, and are for securing cards, and other accessories.

And BTW, those brass standoffs are easy to strip. I used a #4 Klein Phillips initially on the screws, and one of the brass standoffs stripped on me (extras in the bag, TYVM). [ I have less trouble dropping a tool if it's bigger...DOH!]

But a #3 Phillips driver with 'finger tightening' is best. Less chance of over torquing that soft brass metal.
m
0
l
July 18, 2010 12:05:51 PM

Well, therein lies the problem... if you installing the hdd's or moving them, you're unplugged from ground.

This is my first case where the metal of the HDD (albeit external only) is *actually* directly touching the case. (In my Antec Solo, there were rubber stoppers. In my Dell and other's, plastic sliders.)

tom thumb said:

There is very little, if any risk to the HDDs in an Antec 300 from ESD, despite the fact that the metal sides of the HDDs are in contact with the metal case. Keep in mind that if your PSU is plugged in, the whole thing is grounded.

I've seen better hard drive mounting systems, but I've yet to be convinced that they are worth it, unless you plan to move your computer around a lot, in which case it might be better to get a different case or use a 3.5"-5.25" adapter with rubber padding, or similar.

Finally, the sensitive electronics in a HDD are isolated from the outer casing. If you refrain from touching the PCB (if not grounded), secure the hard drive well and connect it properly (power & sata), then you shouldn't have any problems.

m
0
l
July 18, 2010 12:06:35 PM

speaking of which, there ought to be a comprehensive website with diagrams/photos and common names for these common computer-installation related screw types. go tomshardware?

CaptSkip8 said:
Yup. This is correct.

Instruction manuals are good at assuming (which kinda sucks) you know that in the baggie that includes the additional brass standoffs for supporting the motherboard, there are two choices, and only one is the referred to 'Phillips head screws'. The other is the combo Phillips/hex-head that can be secured with either a Phillips screwdriver, or a nut driver/ratchet & socket, and are for securing cards, and other accessories.

And BTW, those brass standoffs are easy to strip. I used a #4 Klein Phillips initially on the screws, and one of the brass standoffs stripped on me (extras in the bag, TYVM). [ I have less trouble dropping a tool if it's bigger...DOH!]

But a #3 Phillips driver with 'finger tightening' is best. Less chance of over torquing that soft brass metal.

m
0
l
July 19, 2010 2:51:15 AM

inac said:
Well, therein lies the problem... if you installing the hdd's or moving them, you're unplugged from ground.

This is my first case where the metal of the HDD (albeit external only) is *actually* directly touching the case. (In my Antec Solo, there were rubber stoppers. In my Dell and other's, plastic sliders.)


What kind of hard drive do you have? I've got a seagate barracuda and it's got this sort of black plastic/composite exterior - which is in contact with the side of the HDD bay. There is no actual metal-on-metal contact going on. Looking at a few pics of WD drives, they've got the same kind of thing going.

If I were you, I wouldn't worry about this. I'd say that in the case of a severe ESD going on in your case, there is more of a risk to your other components - such as your motherboard.
m
0
l
!