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Overclocking on base frequency

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December 9, 2012 3:31:44 AM

Hello all,

Before I start I appreciate I'm probably going to ask a fairly basic question here, and it's probably a bit vague too. I have been searching around the forums for the last couple of hours but the information I find only makes me more confused. That being said, I'd be really grateful if someone could take the time to clear a few things up for me.

I have built a few PC's now for myself and friends, though haven't pursued much overclocking other than increasing the CPU multiplier on my unlocked PhenomII and performed a very small 10% increase in base frequency for a friend at his request; that being said, I am approaching a situation in which I would like to overclock a locked multiplier CPU (i3 3240) by a substantial amount. I am aware that I can overclock through the base frequency, but this will also overclock my memory and whatever lies in my PCI slots equally as much. So I suppose what my question is what components will be effected by the base frequency, and what methods can I employ to reduce the amount of clock increase I would gain on components such as memory and the GPU?

Many thanks in advance,

Chase.
a c 133 K Overclocking
December 9, 2012 4:01:41 AM

By increasing the BCLK you overclock every component controlled by the northbridge chipset. So thats pretty much everything but the onboard sound card and LAN card..

Now I have seen PCs Ivy brigdge chips with a BCLK of 133 that are mostly stable but seem to have some issues with 32-bit programs not designed to run on 64bit windows...

There are NO methods available to limit the OC to the CPU only...

Also keep in mind socket 1155 HATES BCLK OCing, you would need a very good motherboard to do this or you WILL blow a cap or three...

In other words I would like to discourage you or the friend that wants to OC his I3 unless he has money to burn...
December 9, 2012 4:16:49 AM

Novuake said:
By increasing the BCLK you overclock every component controlled by the northbridge chipset. So thats pretty much everything but the onboard sound card and LAN card..

Now I have seen PCs Ivy brigdge chips with a BCLK of 133 that are mostly stable but seem to have some issues with 32-bit programs not designed to run on 64bit windows...

There are NO methods available to limit the OC to the CPU only...

Also keep in mind socket 1155 HATES BCLK OCing, you would need a very good motherboard to do this or you WILL blow a cap or three...

In other words I would like to discourage you or the friend that wants to OC his I3 unless he has money to burn...


Thanks for the response,

Are methods such as underclocking the memory frequency through BIOS and reducing the GPU clock speed via 'AMD OverDrive' not viable in this situation then?
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a c 133 K Overclocking
December 9, 2012 4:42:38 AM

mcchase said:
Thanks for the response,

Are methods such as underclocking the memory frequency through BIOS and reducing the GPU clock speed via 'AMD OverDrive' not viable in this situation then?


In the case of memory, a BCLK OC can not achieve you stability if you force the memory to a lower clock unless timings are adjusted(usually by upping voltage and dropping timings 1-1-1-3 respectively, once again Ivy Bridge CPU can fail if you run RAM that is at more than 1.5V).

As for the GPU, the clock rate at which the PCI-e port operates increases with BLCK increase, not the GPU clock itself. So reducing theGPU clock would be lowering graphics performance while still possibly damaging your mobo.

Think of it as a tick-tock, every component that is controlled by the northbridge ticks at the same rate, so increasing it is forcing the lanes to tick faster but the RAM and GPU don't necessary sync up. RAM is easy but GPU not so much... This is why its not easy to find stability. Some chipsets like 775 were easier, Ivy and Sandy are not...

EDIT : Change my rediculous original memory statement. LOL
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2012 5:07:09 AM

I personally don't recommend any overclocking with the BCLK at all like was said before. Especially on newer machines. This is very bad for the motherboard and causes a lot of stress on everything. The more components you stress; the harder it is to keep stability. Not to mention, today's higher end chipsets/motherboards like the Z77's are already being pushed at stock speeds. There is a lot of stress on them under completely stock conditions and adding to the clock is just quickening it's doom not to mention the near impossibility to find a stable clock if you have a lot going on with your board.

The 680/780SLi chipsets back in the 775 era however had some steps to help overclockers achieve good numbers. Such as PCI lane speed control and ways to actually underclock the ram where you could actually boost the BCLK and not fry the ram. However, that DDR2 ram was much less a problem since the NB had no problems tossing 2.2v into the sticks like the Ivy does with 1.5. There was a host of changes that made it possible to take such processors like the E8400 from 3Ghz to 4Ghz with actual stability.

Let's just say, it's probably best if you stick to stock with that chip. The i3's just weren't meant to overclock, and I believe that's one of the main reasons intel released the K series. Just for guys like us who just love to push their hardware. Using a multiplier to overclock a processor effects pretty much only the CPU and the motherboards voltage regulation systems. It does cause stress on that hardware; but not near as much stress on the machine as adjusting the BCLK.
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2012 5:19:12 AM

There is a reason Intel makes the k series chips. Those are the ones you can OC.
December 9, 2012 7:41:43 AM

steddora said:
I personally don't recommend any overclocking with the BCLK at all like was said before. Especially on newer machines. This is very bad for the motherboard and causes a lot of stress on everything. The more components you stress; the harder it is to keep stability. Not to mention, today's higher end chipsets/motherboards like the Z77's are already being pushed at stock speeds. There is a lot of stress on them under completely stock conditions and adding to the clock is just quickening it's doom not to mention the near impossibility to find a stable clock if you have a lot going on with your board.

The 680/780SLi chipsets back in the 775 era however had some steps to help overclockers achieve good numbers. Such as PCI lane speed control and ways to actually underclock the ram where you could actually boost the BCLK and not fry the ram. However, that DDR2 ram was much less a problem since the NB had no problems tossing 2.2v into the sticks like the Ivy does with 1.5. There was a host of changes that made it possible to take such processors like the E8400 from 3Ghz to 4Ghz with actual stability.

Let's just say, it's probably best if you stick to stock with that chip. The i3's just weren't meant to overclock, and I believe that's one of the main reasons intel released the K series. Just for guys like us who just love to push their hardware. Using a multiplier to overclock a processor effects pretty much only the CPU and the motherboards voltage regulation systems. It does cause stress on that hardware; but not near as much stress on the machine as adjusting the BCLK.


Thanks Steddora - a very clear explanation. There's defiantly a lot of food for thought, and I'm getting the picture what I wished to obtain isn't viable.

Thanks again everyone for your input.
!