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SSD for SRT and CS5 cache?

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  • SSD
  • Photoshop
  • Cache
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
March 6, 2012 1:48:17 AM

Hello, Can I use a SSD for the SRT cache and as the Photoshop CS5 scratch disk at the same time? If so, how big does the SSD have to be? Does it need to be two partitions to do such a thing?

More about : ssd srt cs5 cache

March 12, 2012 8:43:43 PM

Wow... no bump intended, just amazed after a week and not one answer.
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a c 395 G Storage
March 13, 2012 12:06:01 PM

In my humble opinion, you would be better off with an SSD to which you install your OS, with space reserved on it for the Photoshop scratch disk. SRT cache was intended to make SSDs useful even if they are too small to install the OS.
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a c 411 G Storage
March 13, 2012 2:25:11 PM

It's been a while since someone has asked about Intel Smart Response technology. It is an old technology from a few years ago. Here is my standard answer about using an ssd as a cache:

Intel's SRT caching technology was designed for buyers who could not justify or afford the cost of a larger capacity solid-state drive. According to Intel, the original idea was that for about $100.00 a user could purchase a small capacity ssd of about 10 to 20GB and use it as a cache to improve hard disk drive performance. The Operating system and programs were actually stored on a hard disk drive. The actual improvement could not compare to a stand alone ssd. Intel also looked at different capacities all the way up to 512GB and concluded 64GB was the point of diminishing return. It made more sense to use a 64GB ssd as a boot drive that also contained software programs. Intel was hoping that if business clients saw an increase in performance, then they would be induced to purchase larger capacity ssd's that promised an even greater boost in performance.

A lot has changed sinced then, especially prices. Might as well take full advantage of ssd performance.

Here is a link to an official Adobe Photoshop CS5 web page with information about optimizing CS5 performance:

http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/404/kb404439.html

The page contains links to more useful information.

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March 13, 2012 6:22:20 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
It's been a while since someone has asked about Intel Smart Response technology. . .

A lot has changed sinced then, especially prices. Might as well take full advantage of ssd performance.



OK, then I'll use this opportunity to highjack this thread.

What about SSDs on-sale?

I don't have one in this first build. What if there is a great sale on 60GB SSD? But we know that 128GB is the ideal min-performance point, et cetera.

Question is: Can you set up a 60 GB as SRT to a single HDD* and then later add a 128 GB for your OS and programs. Wouldn't the SRT only speed up the HDD? Or would it also access programs off the OS SSD? (I believe I read something to the effect that second option applies but wasn't sure.)

I expect prices will significantly drop for the 60 GB SSDs, so maybe we can still use SRT. Thanks.


* Using an old HDD, waiting for prices to return to normal.
i5-2500k, P8Z68-V


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March 13, 2012 7:33:32 PM

In my humble opinion SRT is still a viable way to stave off the price of a decent sized SSD for another year or so. With the cost of hard drives still sky high, it's also a decent way to breath new life into an old drive. To answer your question. If you use a cache SSD with SRT, and then decide to use a larger SSD for a boot drive, you can still enable caching of the HDD, you'd just point SRT to that drive and away you'd go.

Of course SRT only makes sense if you can get your hands on a small SSD on the cheap. For example I snagged a 30gb SSD a while back for a cool 60... Any more than that and you're better served saving your money.
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a c 411 G Storage
March 13, 2012 8:02:35 PM

Straight from the Adobe web site:

Assigning scratch disks


The following guidelines can help you assign scratch disks:

For best performance, scratch disks should be on a different drive than any large files you are editing.

Scratch disks should be on a different drive than the one your operating system uses for virtual memory.


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