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Bios Flash help for a gpu fan issue?

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  • Graphics Cards
  • BIOS
  • Fan
  • Overclocking
  • Product
Last response: in Overclocking
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December 11, 2012 6:55:16 AM

Not sure if this belongs here but from what I understand the procedure for overclocking and what I'm trying to do are similar so maybe someone can point out what I'm doing wrong.

I'm trying to lower the speed of the fan on a galaxy gt430 card. It's a two pin fan so from what i've read there are no software based controls for the fan due to the lack of the 3rd and 4th pins.

However I've seen conflicting information that it's still possible to adjust the speed through the bios. I've seen people claim they followed certain steps and got their gt430's fan to slow down but also people claiming that no matter what any two pin cannot be adjusted bios or not without using additional hardware.

I've been trying to follow the steps people claim to have had work. Bootable usb, nvflash the bios, edit the bios with nibitor and then flashing the new bios. After flashing the new bios when I check the fan speed it says its changed to a new speed but the fan sounds as if it hasn't changed at all and this is between given values in nvsmi of 42-90% power.

Am I doing something wrong? Is what I'm trying impossible and the instructions i read really apply to a 3-4 pin fan and just didn't mention it?

I would swear that the fan hasn't always been this fast but after recently having to deal with a separate fan that was making noise it's all i can hear now.

More about : bios flash gpu fan issue

a c 208 U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
December 11, 2012 7:05:19 AM

there two things that control the stock fan. the card bios and the video driver. most nvidia cards bios set the fan speed at 40 percent at post. you may hear some fans spin up to 100 percent at post for a min then spin down. once in windows you need msi after burner or a program like it to set the fan sped.
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a c 122 U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
December 11, 2012 7:08:23 AM

Farscape1_14 said:
Not sure if this belongs here but from what I understand the procedure for overclocking and what I'm trying to do are similar so maybe someone can point out what I'm doing wrong.

I'm trying to lower the speed of the fan on a galaxy gt430 card. It's a two pin fan so from what i've read there are no software based controls for the fan due to the lack of the 3rd and 4th pins.

However I've seen conflicting information that it's still possible to adjust the speed through the bios. I've seen people claim they followed certain steps and got their gt430's fan to slow down but also people claiming that no matter what any two pin cannot be adjusted bios or not without using additional hardware.

I've been trying to follow the steps people claim to have had work. Bootable usb, nvflash the bios, edit the bios with nibitor and then flashing the new bios. After flashing the new bios when I check the fan speed it says its changed to a new speed but the fan sounds as if it hasn't changed at all and this is between given values in nvsmi of 42-90% power.

Am I doing something wrong? Is what I'm trying impossible and the instructions i read really apply to a 3-4 pin fan and just didn't mention it?

I would swear that the fan hasn't always been this fast but after recently having to deal with a separate fan that was making noise it's all i can hear now.


There are two ways to control the speed of a DC motor: voltage regulation, and pulse width modulation.

Voltage regulation is rather self explanatory, it simply increases or decreases the supply voltage in order obtain a desired change in motor torque. The difficulty with voltage regulation is that motors are most electrically efficient when they are at their rated voltage, not below. Enter PWM. PWM uses a constant supply voltage such as 5 volts, 9.6 volts, or 12 volts, and a secondary signal which controls a power MOSFET. The PWM signal is switched on and off in a waveform fashion to control the speed of the motor. When the PWM signal is held low (zero volts), the motor will turn off. When the PWM signal is held high (some supply voltage) then the motor will operate at the maximum speed allowed by the motor supply voltage. When the ratio of on time to off time is 50%, it will operate at half speed.

Since you only have two pins for your fan the fan is most likely voltage controlled or uncontrolled as a third pin is needed for PWM and a fourth is needed to report the fan speed back to the controller. It's possible that the PWM controller is simply internal to the PCB, but this is unlikely.

If the fan noise is bothering you, I recommend carefully cleaning it and then lubricating it with WD40.
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December 11, 2012 7:12:48 AM

smorizio said:
there two things that control the stock fan. the card bios and the video driver. most nvidia cards bios set the fan speed at 40 percent at post. you may hear some fans spin up to 100 percent at post for a min then spin down. once in windows you need msi after burner or a program like it to set the fan sped.


If both the bios and the driver control it and I'm sure I've changed the bios numerous times in trying this would the next thing to test be the driver then? Should I uninstall the video driver and see if the fan speed drops or something like that?

This definately isn't spinning down. The fans in my case act like this for a few seconds after booting up so i know what that should sound like.

I had tried using msi afterburner but no matter what I set the fan speed to there even though it's values changed the fans speed remained constant.
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a c 208 U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
December 11, 2012 7:14:13 AM

with msi afterburner you have to turn the auto button off.then click on use my settings on the bottom of msi screen.
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December 11, 2012 7:18:31 AM

Pinhedd said:
There are two ways to control the speed of a DC motor: voltage regulation, and pulse width modulation.

Voltage regulation is rather self explanatory, it simply increases or decreases the supply voltage in order obtain a desired change in motor torque. The difficulty with voltage regulation is that motors are most electrically efficient when they are at their rated voltage, not below. Enter PWM. PWM uses a constant supply voltage such as 5 volts, 9.6 volts, or 12 volts, and a secondary signal which controls a power MOSFET. The PWM signal is switched on and off in a waveform fashion to control the speed of the motor. When the PWM signal is held low (zero volts), the motor will turn off. When the PWM signal is held high (some supply voltage) then the motor will operate at the maximum speed allowed by the motor supply voltage. When the ratio of on time to off time is 50%, it will operate at half speed.

Since you only have two pins for your fan the fan is most likely voltage controlled or uncontrolled as a third pin is needed for PWM and a fourth is needed to report the fan speed back to the controller. It's possible that the PWM controller is simply internal to the PCB, but this is unlikely.

If the fan noise is bothering you, I recommend carefully cleaning it and then lubricating it with WD40.


I've taken care of the fans maintenance so I'm sure this is more an issue of an odd speed rather than dust or a lack of lubrication.

I'm trying to wrap my head around what you've explained but if I'm lacking the additional pins for the PWM control does that mean I have no means of controlling the speed even through the bios?
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December 11, 2012 7:27:50 AM

smorizio said:
with msi afterburner you have to turn the auto button off.then click on use my settings on the bottom of msi screen.


I turned the auto button off and clicked the user defined option, I didn't see anything named "use my settings".

After hitting apply the graph updates to the new value selected but the fan remains constant.

I'm not sure how this program works but I was under the impression these kinds don't work without the additional pins unless this is a different sort of program.
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
December 11, 2012 7:41:06 AM

If nothing works you can use a cable like this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I don't know if it will fit the fan header on the graphics card, but you can supply power from the motherboard sysfan header. If the other end of the cable doesn't fit either just cut off the plugs and connect red to red and black to black wires.

Instead of buying this cable you can just solder a resistor into the red wire yourself.

I assume that fan voltage is 12V. There are different reductions available:
12->9.6V, 12->7.5V, 12->5V.
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a b U Graphics card
a c 190 K Overclocking
December 11, 2012 6:00:12 PM

You could do a variable resistor mod if you desired, keep that element of control
Moto
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a c 122 U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
December 11, 2012 6:53:00 PM

Farscape1_14 said:
I've taken care of the fans maintenance so I'm sure this is more an issue of an odd speed rather than dust or a lack of lubrication.

I'm trying to wrap my head around what you've explained but if I'm lacking the additional pins for the PWM control does that mean I have no means of controlling the speed even through the bios?


That's most likely the case. Motor assemblies that support PWM have 3 or 4 wires. It's possible to 'pulse' a non PWM motor in the same fashion, but I don't see why anyone would do this.
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