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Building computer, HELP ME PLEASE

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February 25, 2010 5:27:49 AM

i am building my first computer, and dont have an "extensive" knowledge on certain things pertaining to it. my friend is very knowledgeable, but im looking for a second opinion. thanks in advance
i will be mainly using this for media, and media related things. also medium to medium-heavy gaming, with the possible future expansion to extensive gaming.

-Intel Core i7-860 Lynnfield 2.8GHz 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 95W Quad-Core Processor
-ASUS P7P55D LE LGA 1156 Intel P55 ATX Intel Motherboard
-SILVERSTONE OP1000-E 1000W ATX 12V 2.2 & EPS 12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready Active PFC Compatible with Core i7 Power Supply
-Fujitsu MBA3300 MBA3147RC 147GB 15000 RPM 16MB Cache Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
Sony Optiarc Black 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 12X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD--ROM 2MB Cache SATA DVD/CD Rewritable Drive
-SAPPHIRE 100287VGAL Radeon HD 5670 (Redwood) 512MB 128-bit DDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
-G.SKILL Trident 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 2000 (PC3 16000) Desktop Memory Model F3-16000CL9D-4GBTD

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February 25, 2010 6:23:40 AM

I know you write that this will be build with possible future expansion to extensive gaming in mind, but you have selected a non-sli/crossfire board, and with that your powersupply is extremely overkill, going with a CORSAIR CMPSU-650TX would leave you enough power to upgrade your GPU to a Radeon 5970.

And speaking of gaming, your choice of GPU will not perform satisfactory unless using a low resolution, and even then it will struggle on some games.
February 25, 2010 7:08:58 AM
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February 25, 2010 7:10:37 AM

lothdk said:
I know you write that this will be build with possible future expansion to extensive gaming in mind, but you have selected a non-sli/crossfire board, and with that your powersupply is extremely overkill, going with a CORSAIR CMPSU-650TX would leave you enough power to upgrade your GPU to a Radeon 5970.

And speaking of gaming, your choice of GPU will not perform satisfactory unless using a low resolution, and even then it will struggle on some games.


its says it is. sorry for late link post
February 25, 2010 7:14:30 AM

jonnyshatter said:
its says it is. sorry for late link post

If this is in regard to the motherboard offering crossfire support, then yes, it does, but since the second PCIe x16 port will be running at x4 it will have a severe impact on the performance of the setup, you will need to get a motherboard that offers x8 x8 with dual video cards.
February 25, 2010 7:16:37 AM

and if it is. would crossfire do it? like what games are we talking? thanks
February 25, 2010 7:19:07 AM

lothdk said:
If this is in regard to the motherboard offering crossfire support, then yes, it does, but since the second PCIe x16 port will be running at x4 it will have a severe impact on the performance of the setup, you will need to get a motherboard that offers x8 x8 with dual video cards.


thanks. noob: what is x8 x8?
February 25, 2010 7:34:07 AM

jonnyshatter said:
so this one then? and wouldnt conflict with anything?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Yes, that would be a markedly improvement when running dual video cards.

Here is an article about crossfiring with x4 ports..

From the Conclusion page

"Less surprising was the horrific performance of the x4 slot available on many P55 motherboards through the chipset’s PCIe hub. These lanes offer only PCIe 1.1-class bandwidth regardless of their PCIe 2.0 labeling, dropping 26% behind even the x4 slot available on similarly-priced X58 motherboards. A slot that slow might be useful for adding a graphics card, but only if that card is used for lower-performance applications, such as a dedicated PhysX processor or 2D desktop expansion."
February 25, 2010 7:45:45 AM

Thanks... Trying to stay in a very restricted budget of like $1000-$1200ish (I know, funny funny) but thanks for all the help. And other improvements i could do? You said less power too...
February 25, 2010 7:51:00 AM

jonnyshatter said:
Thanks... Trying to stay in a very restricted budget of like $1000-$1200ish (I know, funny funny) but thanks for all the help. And other improvements i could do? You said less power too...


According to AMDs spec for 5970 crossfire a 850W power supply would suffice, a quality unit like CORSAIR CMPSU-850TX would save some bucks.

- edit

Just noticed your case, it is rather small, and according to posters on newegg, too small to fit large sized video cards, and you would also have trouble with many aftermarket HSFs.

I know you said you wanted a small case, but if you are looking to run crossfire, you need a case with good space and air flow, and your current choice does not fit that description.
February 25, 2010 8:13:02 AM

jonnyshatter said:
Thanks... Trying to stay in a very restricted budget of like $1000-$1200ish (I know, funny funny) but thanks for all the help. And other improvements i could do? You said less power too...


The most obvious place to save money would be to go with a regular SATA drive, which would easily save you $100 while still offering good performance, something like the Samsung F3 500 GB.
If you keep the SAS drive, make sure the motherboard supports it, as not all do.
February 25, 2010 5:11:37 PM

If you are going to use socket 1156 as a foundation for a system with an eye toward future upgradeability to high-end gaming you should only consider motherboards that incorporate an nvidia n200 bridge chip to increase the pci-e lanes available to your video solutions. The socket 1156 is not a good solution for high-end gaming in its stock format as it is way to limited in the number of pci-e lanes and some of the lanes do not run full speed.
February 25, 2010 6:16:04 PM

This motherboard or one of similar configuration is the only one to consider if he is serious about upgrading to a hardcore gaming platform in the future http://phonestechnology.blogspot.com/2009/11/motherboar... . The 1156 socket has to many limitations in its native configuraton to be a serious gaming platform. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... this motherboard covers all of your hot buttons. It has sas support gives you upgrade ability for video usb 3.0 support essentially everything you could need in a modern motherboard and it is not much more than you would spend on the board you have speced.
February 25, 2010 9:50:29 PM

so based on your motherboard recommendation, any specific parts that are made for each other that would work good and super smooth, all for their moneys worth?
id like;
4gbs of ddr3 ram (2x2gbs) fast, but not unnecessarily overkill
500gb(ish) hard drive
at least 2.8ghz (preferably intel i7)

and should i get two good graphics cards and crossfire? or get one reallY good one?
Spoiler
this is getting complicated lol

February 25, 2010 11:38:58 PM

jonnyshatter said:
i am building my first computer, and dont have an "extensive" knowledge on certain things pertaining to it. my friend is very knowledgeable, but im looking for a second opinion. thanks in advance
i will be mainly using this for media, and media related things. also medium to medium-heavy gaming, with the possible future expansion to extensive gaming.

-Intel Core i7-860 Lynnfield 2.8GHz 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 95W Quad-Core Processor
-ASUS P7P55D LE LGA 1156 Intel P55 ATX Intel Motherboard
-SILVERSTONE OP1000-E 1000W ATX 12V 2.2 & EPS 12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready Active PFC Compatible with Core i7 Power Supply
-Fujitsu MBA3300 MBA3147RC 147GB 15000 RPM 16MB Cache Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
Sony Optiarc Black 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 12X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD--ROM 2MB Cache SATA DVD/CD Rewritable Drive
-SAPPHIRE 100287VGAL Radeon HD 5670 (Redwood) 512MB 128-bit DDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
-G.SKILL Trident 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 2000 (PC3 16000) Desktop Memory Model F3-16000CL9D-4GBTD


CPU is good.
MOBO is good.
PSU is overkill. Suggest corsair 650w or 750W.
SAS hard drive Will not attach to a SATA port. 15k drives are for servers and do not necessarily perform better in normal desktop usage.
I suggest a good SSD if the price does not bother you :
INtel X25-M 160gb gen2: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Otherwise a large 1tb drive, and plan to use only 150gb of it.
For gaming, get a faster graphics card. cut back on the cpu to a i5-750 if you need to.
Do not be seduced by crossfire/sli talk. If you need to upgrade in the future, there will be faster and cheaper cards. Sell your old, and replace it with the new.
DDR3-2000 is a waste.

For any ram you are considering, do your own homework.
Go to the ram vendor's web site, and access their configurator.
Corsair, Kingston, Patriot, OCZ and others have them.
Their compatibility list is more current than the motherboard vendor's QVL lists which rarely get updated.
Enter your mobo or PC, and get a list of compatible ram sticks.

Here are a few links:

http://www.crucial.com/index.aspx

http://www.corsair.com/configurator/default.aspx

http://kingston.com/

http://conf.ocztechnology.com/index.php?c=1

http://www.patriotmemory.com/configurator/index.jsp

Cpu performance is not very sensitive to ram speeds.
If you look at real application and game benchmarks(vs. synthetic tests),
you will see negligible difference in performance between the slowest DDR2 and the fastest DDR3 ram.
Perhaps 1-2%. Not worth it to me.
Don't pay extra for faster ram or better timings unless you are a maximum overclocker.
March 1, 2010 12:09:46 PM

With the above you can play any game on high resolution including Crysis.
!