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Cant overclock 2500k more than 4ghz

Last response: in Overclocking
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December 14, 2012 1:02:40 PM

Hello I just bought my self a hyper 212 evo but there is a problem... when i overclock my cpu more than 4ghz PC starts to act strange lol for example sometimes when i want to turn it on it turns off after 3 seconds then on Immediately and when overclocking more than 4ghz the mouse cursor is laggy but after a few seconds it becomes ok and i cant wake my computer from sleep mode with more than 4ghz overclocking so you guys know whats wrong? Im just so curious why this happens? My system Specs : 8GB RAM (2corsair 2kingstone All occupied) / 670GTX 2gb graphic card / i5 2500k with hyper212 evo / p8p67 LE motherboard GIGABYTE 720wat power supply (MY max CPU voltage at 4ghz is 1320 and at 4.2 it goes around 1350

More about : overclock 2500k 4ghz

Anonymous
a b à CPUs
December 14, 2012 2:17:09 PM

Simply put, your 4ghz oc is not stable, 1.320v seems like an awefull lot of Volts for 4ghz as well.
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December 14, 2012 2:38:32 PM

Anonymous said:
Simply put, your 4ghz oc is not stable, 1.320v seems like an awefull lot of Volts for 4ghz as well.

But the safe Voltage is below 1.5 isnt it? so what can i do to reduce it? is that because of this voltage that makes these things happen?
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a b K Overclocking
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December 14, 2012 2:46:10 PM

Well, from what you've told us, it really sounds like that's about the limit your particular cpu can get to. Getting to 4ghz is usually the easy part with intel i5 unlocked cpu's, but after that it really just depends on how well the particular chip was manufactured.

But just to make sure you just don't have some setting that's incorrect, have you tried finding an overclocking guide on google for your particular motherboard and cpu combination? For the i5 2500k, 4ghz actually seems a little slow for a voltage of 1.320v.

Also, is PLL overvoltage enabled or disabled? I've always read that you should keep it disabled unless you're going for a HUGE overclock (like 4.7ghz+) because if its enabled it could prevent your comp from waking from sleep mode or even booting.

Check out this guide. It was made for the 2500k, but with an AsRock Extreme4 mobo. The settings on your particular mobo should be similar though: http://www.overclock.net/t/1198504/complete-overclockin...
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a b å Intel
a c 121 K Overclocking
a c 315 à CPUs
December 14, 2012 2:53:55 PM

Not all cpu chips have the same overclocking potential.
You might have lost out of the binning lottery and have a lower potential chip.
Intel only guarantees the stock 3.3.
Can you get 4.0 stable? Possibly with more work than normal.
But, is it really worth it if you can do 3.9 stable.

An OC involving upping the FSB can be tricky with limited upside potential.
2-3% is potentially there, but there are many more interactions than just upping the max multiplier.
Do some research on that.

Also, check the bios level of your P8P67 motherboard.
My P8P67-M PRO needed several before OC became easy.
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a c 190 K Overclocking
a c 103 à CPUs
December 14, 2012 2:56:00 PM

Run memtest on each of your ramsticks and see which is the best set of ram to use, I don't think you are helping yourself mismatching kits
that may not be the sole issue, but its a very probable cause.
Moto
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a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
December 14, 2012 4:18:17 PM

Oh these guys are great - I totally missed the mismatched RAM sticks. Download memtest86 (you run it via USB, CD, or Floppy - set that to boot before Windows in ur Bios) to check your Ram. You can also try taking out one of the sets and trying to overclock past 4.0ghz and see if you're still not stable.
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a b å Intel
a c 121 K Overclocking
a c 315 à CPUs
December 14, 2012 4:30:50 PM

When you see a delay during the booting process, it is often the bios searching for a ram setting that will work.
When you use 4 sticks, it is harder for the motherboard to manage because it must use the same voltage setting for all sticks.
I like the suggestion to try the oc with just two sticks.
If you don't have sufficient ram with 2 sticks, then replace it with two larger sized sticks. It is a good thing that ram is cheap.

And... there is little value in real app performance or fps with faster ram than 1600.
Read this study:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4503/sandy-bridge-memory-...
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December 14, 2012 7:31:04 PM

fudoka711 said:
Well, from what you've told us, it really sounds like that's about the limit your particular cpu can get to. Getting to 4ghz is usually the easy part with intel i5 unlocked cpu's, but after that it really just depends on how well the particular chip was manufactured.

But just to make sure you just don't have some setting that's incorrect, have you tried finding an overclocking guide on google for your particular motherboard and cpu combination? For the i5 2500k, 4ghz actually seems a little slow for a voltage of 1.320v.

Also, is PLL overvoltage enabled or disabled? I've always read that you should keep it disabled unless you're going for a HUGE overclock (like 4.7ghz+) because if its enabled it could prevent your comp from waking from sleep mode or even booting.

Check out this guide. It was made for the 2500k, but with an AsRock Extreme4 mobo. The settings on your particular mobo should be similar though: http://www.overclock.net/t/1198504/complete-overclockin...

Thanks for your reply... I just checked my voltage in bios and its different with CPUZ bios shows 1.216 max and CPUZ shows around 1320 I am really tired now but I will surely try with 2 ram sticks and i think that my cpu cant do just more because I have just swapped my case for the new cpu cooler (my old case was small for it) and the ram layouts were different in that rig I have tried OCing in that old rig too and i remember that I have experienced similar issues as this one thank you all but I am asking one question now is BIOS showing the proper voltage or CPUZ?
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a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
December 14, 2012 7:48:56 PM

Everyone here is spot on. But I must add a couple things from my point of view.

If you're not overclocking that RAM, and you want to use it; find the set with the worst timing. Say 9-9-9-24 is the timing and the second is like 8-8-8-20. Just an example, but the 9-9-9-24 is slower. Manually set the slower timings in the BIOS and don't enable it to read the XMP from the chips. That will eliminate ram issues if you're hellbent on overclocking with that ram. Best decision, pick up some cheap 1600mhz kits with good timings.

Clocking with voltages on auto can be a pain in the ... well you know. Try setting up for fixed voltage, disable turbo, speedstep, and the power saving crap. I started from 1.1v on my 2600k and made it to 4Ghz (not 24h Prime stable). I boosted the voltage slowly and made it all the way to 4.8Ghz at 1.375 that actually booted.

Now, the max rating is 1.5v but I don't like being over 1.3 for long at all. I hit 4.4Ghz on this chip at 1.25v and couldn't be happier. I eventually learned more about voltage offset and how to transition back to having speedstep enabled and being able to idle at 0.9v and 1600mhz.

Now another thing, like was said before; some chips just don't have a lot of potential like my chip (I lucked out great). So you need to do some research first.

Research these things:

2500k overclocking (of course)
Your motherboard and overclocking (another duh)
Voltage modes (Auto, Offset, Fixed)
Load Line Calibration or LLC
CPU PLL Voltage
BCLK (Since you have a 2500k BCLK adjustments are pretty much not needed, and with sandy and ivy bridge chipsets not recommended at all)

Also find any additional settings in the BIOS and write them down and research them.

Last but absolutely not least; what are your temperatures like? The Sandy Bridge WILL shut down after 100C to save itself from frying out. It will actually start throttling I believe at 87C or so which can cause the "mouse" lag as the cooler catches up just enough to pass the thermal throttling protection. If your hitting temperatures of over 80C, you need to drop the voltage and overclock in a hurry.

At 3.3Ghz (stock) you should be idling at about 28-30C and full load at around 55-60C with the Hyper212 installed properly. If you didn't apply the thermal paste correctly, you can skyrocket temperatures even with that cooler. Those temperatures are if you properly put the paste on. Anything much higher shows bad case ventilation and/or bad thermal paste installation. If the temperatures are idling over 40C, you need to double check that thermal paste installation.

Just for you to know, when installing a new cooler you need to clean the CPU and base of the cooler with isopropyl alcohol (I recommend 70% or higher) and a lint free cloth or coffee filter. Get them clean and nice and apply a small amount of the paste that came with the Hyper212 (it's decent stuff). When I say small, I'm talking 2-3grains of rice size splotch in the middle of the CPU before placing the HSF onto it. Once you press that HSF onto the CPU do NOT remove it without cleaning it again as it will cause a bad installation with air pockets and you will not have efficient cooling.


I hope this helps out!
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December 14, 2012 7:55:31 PM

steddora said:
Everyone here is spot on. But I must add a couple things from my point of view.

If you're not overclocking that RAM, and you want to use it; find the set with the worst timing. Say 9-9-9-24 is the timing and the second is like 8-8-8-20. Just an example, but the 9-9-9-24 is slower. Manually set the slower timings in the BIOS and don't enable it to read the XMP from the chips. That will eliminate ram issues if you're hellbent on overclocking with that ram. Best decision, pick up some cheap 1600mhz kits with good timings.

Clocking with voltages on auto can be a pain in the ... well you know. Try setting up for fixed voltage, disable turbo, speedstep, and the power saving crap. I started from 1.1v on my 2600k and made it to 4Ghz (not 24h Prime stable). I boosted the voltage slowly and made it all the way to 4.8Ghz at 1.375 that actually booted.

Now, the max rating is 1.5v but I don't like being over 1.3 for long at all. I hit 4.4Ghz on this chip at 1.25v and couldn't be happier. I eventually learned more about voltage offset and how to transition back to having speedstep enabled and being able to idle at 0.9v and 1600mhz.

Now another thing, like was said before; some chips just don't have a lot of potential like my chip (I lucked out great). So you need to do some research first.

Research these things:

2500k overclocking (of course)
Your motherboard and overclocking (another duh)
Voltage modes (Auto, Offset, Fixed)
Load Line Calibration or LLC
CPU PLL Voltage
BCLK (Since you have a 2500k BCLK adjustments are pretty much not needed, and with sandy and ivy bridge chipsets not recommended at all)

Also find any additional settings in the BIOS and write them down and research them.

Last but absolutely not least; what are your temperatures like? The Sandy Bridge WILL shut down after 100C to save itself from frying out. It will actually start throttling I believe at 87C or so which can cause the "mouse" lag as the cooler catches up just enough to pass the thermal throttling protection. If your hitting temperatures of over 80C, you need to drop the voltage and overclock in a hurry.

At 3.3Ghz (stock) you should be idling at about 28-30C and full load at around 55-60C with the Hyper212 installed properly. If you didn't apply the thermal paste correctly, you can skyrocket temperatures even with that cooler. Those temperatures are if you properly put the paste on. Anything much higher shows bad case ventilation and/or bad thermal paste installation. If the temperatures are idling over 40C, you need to double check that thermal paste installation.

Just for you to know, when installing a new cooler you need to clean the CPU and base of the cooler with isopropyl alcohol (I recommend 70% or higher) and a lint free cloth or coffee filter. Get them clean and nice and apply a small amount of the paste that came with the Hyper212 (it's decent stuff). When I say small, I'm talking 2-3grains of rice size splotch in the middle of the CPU before placing the HSF onto it. Once you press that HSF onto the CPU do NOT remove it without cleaning it again as it will cause a bad installation with air pockets and you will not have efficient cooling.


I hope this helps out!

(BTW I OCed my cpu to 4.1ghz and its stable and works fine)Thanks for your reply... my temp doesnt go more than 60c and im pretty noob in hardware i cant find the PLL thing in bios where is it ? AI Tweaker part? im gonna check it out again where is it?
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a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
December 14, 2012 8:14:29 PM

Research what they do before EVER messing with any settings. And a big thing is; find out what the settings should be at stock. Like was said before, PLL won't need adjusting unless you're really trying to push that chip to the 5Ghz+ range; which you'll need some insane cooling for. What gets your chip to 60C? Are you running Prime? Prime usually doesn't get the CPU hot for at least five minutes or so and usually runs averaging temperatures after 20-30 minutes of runtime where it holds my processor at about 54C. IntelBurnTest will get my chip over 60C when I'm at 4.4Ghz and it's pulling 1.2+ volts.
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