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What is Capacitor Aging?

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May 4, 2010 8:42:45 PM

what is Capacitor Aging its in most of the psu calculators?

More about : capacitor aging

a b à CPUs
May 4, 2010 8:44:53 PM

Its really self explanatory.
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May 4, 2010 8:51:39 PM

ok but whats it used for? gprs, motherboards,psu? Also how do you know what % your parts would fall into?

Im making a new pc so would I need to worry about this?
May 4, 2010 8:53:53 PM

I agree. It's in the phrase. Capacitors have a lifespan and their effectiveness decreases with age. For example, my motherboard uses solid capacitors with a 50,000 hour lifespan, and they can go a long time before their age starts to cause a problem.
a b à CPUs
May 4, 2010 8:55:36 PM

It refers primarily to the motherboard and the ability of the capacitors to store current effectively. If you're looking at a new PC then your capacitor aging would be 0%. Although whenever a PSU calculator is used I tend to add at least 30% onto the given value due to various inaccuracies and also the fact that the majority of PSUs are more efficient at 70% load than at say 80-90% load. Hope this helps!
May 4, 2010 8:57:06 PM

Capacitor aging is hen the capacitors in the PSU lose some of their capacitance, thus being able to put out less Wattage than what they are rated for. Remember that PSUs run at ~75-80% max efficiency.
May 4, 2010 8:57:19 PM

A new motherboard would have 0% aging. They're virtually unused. In other words, they have 100% of their lifespan left. Hope that helps.
May 4, 2010 9:01:38 PM

To go off of what moody said, you may also want to think about how long you're going to keep this machine. If you plan on keeping it for 3 years, do a rough calculation of how "old" the capacitors will be when you're ready to upgrade. You may want to use that number just so you're certain the PSU is good enough for the life of the system.
May 4, 2010 9:06:46 PM

with out Capacitor Aging my pc came to about 670W and i have a 700w
May 4, 2010 9:08:25 PM

thats with cpu 100%
System Load: 100%
a b à CPUs
May 4, 2010 9:14:25 PM

In that case, and bearing what leo2kp said, as you use your system obviously your capacitor aging increases causing less efficiency hence more power consumption. So you're really pushing the limits of your PSU there if that info is correct.

Are you 100% sure you completed the forms correctly? I've never been a fan of PSU calculators, mainly due to the complicated forms to fill out that the majority of people complete incorrectly through no fault of their own. That, and also the fact that they seem to under-estimate from my experience at least whilst your results seem pretty high.

If you could post a full list of your system specs that would help clarify.
May 4, 2010 9:15:56 PM

moody89 said:
It refers primarily to the motherboard and the ability of the capacitors to store current effectively. If you're looking at a new PC then your capacitor aging would be 0%. Although whenever a PSU calculator is used I tend to add at least 30% onto the given value due to various inaccuracies and also the fact that the majority of PSUs are more efficient at 70% load than at say 80-90% load. Hope this helps!



with out Capacitor Aging my pc came to about 670W and i have a 700w

thats with cpu 100%
System Load: 100%
May 4, 2010 9:19:41 PM

moody89 said:
In that case, and bearing what leo2kp said, as you use your system obviously your capacitor aging increases causing less efficiency hence more power consumption. So you're really pushing the limits of your PSU there if that info is correct.

Are you 100% sure you completed the forms correctly? I've never been a fan of PSU calculators, mainly due to the complicated forms to fill out that the majority of people complete incorrectly through no fault of their own. That, and also the fact that they seem to under-estimate from my experience at least whilst your results seem pretty high.

If you could post a full list of your system specs that would help clarify.




i have got a coolmaster silent pro 700w

the spec i will use is

over clocking the 955 to about 3,8116mhz


also i will be runing 5770fxx in crossfire

2-4gb of ddr3

7200rpm hdd

3 led 120mm fans

2 small led fans

ASUS Crosshair III Formula Republic of Gamers Series AMD 790FX Socket AM3 XFI Audio Card ATX Motherboard

Corsair CWCH50-1 Cooling Hydro Series H50 High-performance CPU Cooler supports LGA1156 LGA775

+2 ubs things

a b à CPUs
May 4, 2010 9:33:29 PM

These are the official recommended power requirements based on your graphics card:

450 Watt or greater power supply with one 75W 6-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (600 Watt and two 6-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)

This applies to the entire system not just your card.

It looks as though the calculator was fairly accurate. As I mentioned you would probably be around the limit of your PSU but you should be ok. Coolermaster don't have the reputations of, say Corsair, for consistently high quality PSUs but your model appears to have favourable verdicts from several technical reviews. You should be ok, but keep an eye on things :)  Good luck!
May 5, 2010 8:34:39 AM

moody89 said:
These are the official recommended power requirements based on your graphics card:

450 Watt or greater power supply with one 75W 6-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (600 Watt and two 6-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)

This applies to the entire system not just your card.

It looks as though the calculator was fairly accurate. As I mentioned you would probably be around the limit of your PSU but you should be ok. Coolermaster don't have the reputations of, say Corsair, for consistently high quality PSUs but your model appears to have favourable verdicts from several technical reviews. You should be ok, but keep an eye on things :)  Good luck!



how can i check on my pc power Usage?

also i am planing to change my psu next year.
a b à CPUs
May 5, 2010 8:47:02 AM

Electrolytic Capacitor

*Image from wikipedia

It has water in, that dries up over time. As the water (or whatever fluid), it's capability decreases.

Based on the psu calculator, you are pretty much near the max of your psu. Though realistically you wouldn't be pushing your components that high all the time. You could get a bigger psu if you want to.
a b à CPUs
May 5, 2010 9:46:39 AM

amnotanoobie said:
Electrolytic Capacitor
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/Condensador_electrolitico_150_microF_400V.jpg/250px-Condensador_electrolitico_150_microF_400V.jpg
*Image from wikipedia

It has water in, that dries up over time. As the water (or whatever fluid), it's capability decreases.

Based on the psu calculator, you are pretty much near the max of your psu. Though realistically you wouldn't be pushing your components that high all the time. You could get a bigger psu if you want to.


Dont remind me. Got 3 caps about to blow. :lol: 
a b à CPUs
May 5, 2010 10:00:25 AM

warmon6 said:
Dont remind me. Got 3 caps about to blow. :lol: 


:o 

Maybe it's just their time to go.... :D 
May 5, 2010 11:23:35 AM

who thinks i should get a new psu (coolmaster never been used yet) or should i stick with cool master for about a year?
a b à CPUs
May 5, 2010 11:54:41 AM

You could use the CM psu until it burns out (if it ever burns out, which I doubt).
May 5, 2010 11:59:07 AM

when it burns out will it take other stuff out?
a b à CPUs
May 5, 2010 12:05:23 PM

robin banks uk said:
when it burns out will it take other stuff out?


If the CM psu is properly made (I haven't read reviews for your psu), it would simply die out since the components want more power than it could provide. Most of your other components should be fine.

Also the psu calculators are usually a bit overspec'd to be sure that you'd get something bigger. Check the reviews of processors and video cards and you'd see different power consumption numbers (usually lower).
May 5, 2010 12:56:42 PM

amnotanoobie said:
If the CM psu is properly made (I haven't read reviews for your psu), it would simply die out since the components want more power than it could provide. Most of your other components should be fine.

Also the psu calculators are usually a bit overspec'd to be sure that you'd get something bigger. Check the reviews of processors and video cards and you'd see different power consumption numbers (usually lower).


will i be ok keeping the cm runing as its new, if so im going to change it june 2011
a b à CPUs
May 6, 2010 6:48:51 AM

robin banks uk said:
will i be ok keeping the cm runing as its new, if so im going to change it june 2011


Your psu seems to be a pretty solid one, you could probably use it way way past June 2011.
May 6, 2010 10:55:14 AM

amnotanoobie said:
Your psu seems to be a pretty solid one, you could probably use it way way past June 2011.


when do you think it would be a good time to change it?

some say im taking a risk with that spec do you think i will be ok?
a c 133 à CPUs
May 6, 2010 3:10:11 PM

Bro stop worrying so much you will be fine with that PSU Cooler Master has some bad PSU's and they have some very good units too you got one of thier better units. Like others said the PSU calculators overestimate by alot IMO you could probably run that system on a 550 watt unit if it was a quality unit. Your 700 watt CM unit will be no problem and should last as long as you take care of it. By take care of it make sure it doesn't get clogged with dust and keep good ventilation in your case if you do that you should see plenty of life left in that PSU.

Good Luck and stop worrying so much and enjoy your rig.
!