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2500k Overclocking Help Needed/Programs

Last response: in Overclocking
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December 17, 2012 10:24:58 PM

I am currently in the process of overclocking my 2500k on the stock cooler on a Gigabyte Z68-UD4 Motherboard. I have a couple questions regarding testing and the actual overclock of my CPU.

My first question is, I am using CPU-Z to see my Clock speed and my voltage, but the voltage in CPU-Z doesn't match the voltage I put into the BIOS of my motherboard? I put 1.240V into the core voltage in my BIOS but in testing CPU-Z says the voltage is 1.212V, is this normal? I've tried putting 1.225V in the BIOS but then CPU-Z reports it as 1.200V during Prime95 testing.

My second question is, what do you do to test in Prime95 when overclocking? When I overclock and want to test, I use the "Small FFTs" setting in Prime95 and let it run for a couple hours(usually 4-8 hours).


My process so far:

I have read that people say that 1.225V-1.230V is stock voltage for the 2500k, so I wanted to see how far I can go on stock voltage before needing to up the volts, I was able to get around 3.9GHz(tested for 4+ hours) and it seemed beyond stable, but right when I upped it to 4.0GHz, it BSOD during Prime95 testing(about 10 minutes in).

So, I upped the voltage a bit to 1.240V and set it to 4.0GHz OC and I'm about 20 minutes into testing in Prime95. Is this fine? Am I doing it correctly? So far my hottest core is 88C(at max, but it's 87C consistently) and it seems to be fine for a stock cooler OC.

Any tips? Did I mess up? Am I harming my CPU already?

Thanks for any and all advice :) 

p,s, I also read the "I7 - 2600K / I5 - 2500K Overclocking Guide" by mrface and I have ordered a CM 212+ from Newegg yesterday and it's on its way, I just want to see how far I can go with the stock cooler :) 
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December 18, 2012 8:17:21 AM

87C would be a bit too high. I would recommend putting it back to stock until your cooler arrives. You're on the right track with overclocking. Pick a speed, 4.5 Ghz is usually a good number. Run Prime95 for at least an hour. If it crashes before an hour, up the voltage until it's stable. Some people run Prime95 for 24 hours. The longest I ran Prime95 was a little over 8 hours. I have a 2500K at 4.5 Ghz with voltage at 1.335. I have an MSI Z77A-G45 motherboard. It doesn't have a lot of the overclocking options like the better boards. The only thing I adjust was cpu multiplier to 45, core voltage to 1.335 and vdroop to 100%. My system has been stable.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 18, 2012 9:26:17 PM

You're running to hot! The stock cooler should be safe with 4Ghz on that chip if you didn't get a "bum" clocking chip which I have seen some people get. At 4Ghz you should be able to run about 1.15v or so to remain stable at fixed voltage. However I have read where some people can't get 4Ghz to stay stable on under 1.25v. So try setting back to stock clock, run a low voltage like 1.150 or so and start testing.

I'd say limit your temps to 70C. As you boost your frequency the temps will jump a little. When you boost your voltage, the temps will jump a LOT. So just take it slow, keep it under 70C (after 10-15 minutes of Prime), and don't give up.

One thing I suggest more than anything with the stock cooler though, in the BIOS set the fan to 100% speed. That way it's running max speed all the time and you don't have to worry about it trying to catch up with cooling an already hot Aluminum heatsink. :) 
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December 19, 2012 6:01:02 AM

steddora said:
You're running to hot! The stock cooler should be safe with 4Ghz on that chip if you didn't get a "bum" clocking chip which I have seen some people get. At 4Ghz you should be able to run about 1.15v or so to remain stable at fixed voltage. However I have read where some people can't get 4Ghz to stay stable on under 1.25v. So try setting back to stock clock, run a low voltage like 1.150 or so and start testing.

I'd say limit your temps to 70C. As you boost your frequency the temps will jump a little. When you boost your voltage, the temps will jump a LOT. So just take it slow, keep it under 70C (after 10-15 minutes of Prime), and don't give up.

One thing I suggest more than anything with the stock cooler though, in the BIOS set the fan to 100% speed. That way it's running max speed all the time and you don't have to worry about it trying to catch up with cooling an already hot Aluminum heatsink. :) 



I know I'm running too hot and I have already set my voltage and clocks back to stock settings, right when it hit 80C I knew it was time to tone it down! 70C is my breaking point and it was killing me seeing my CPU that high in temps.

My 212+ just came in, but school is still here and I'll have to do that first before installing my new HS into my case and testing!

Damn finals...thanks for the recommendation of the 1.150 volts, I'll have to try that and see where I can go from there!
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