Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Motherboard seems fried all of a sudden

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
October 20, 2010 4:20:56 AM

A few weeks ago I got an Intel DP55WG to replace the defective MSI motherboard I did have.

It was working great (I did have 2 or 3 black screens in the past few weeks), but then all of a sudden my computer froze. I booted back up and it freezes in the login screen, which hasn't happened since I purchased this motherboard. Right when it froze my fan speed kicked up a notch.

When I tried to boot back up, I was stuck in a boot loop. My components would turn on for a second then my computer would shut off, then it would turn back on, etc. I did notice my heatsink fan twitching so I moved it to another fan pin and it atleast started spinning in the boot cycles.

I switched my PSU from an OCZ 850watt to an PC Power Supply and Cooling 610 watt and my computer booted again, but then froze at startup again. When rebooting it again was stuck in the boot cycle.

I waited for a while, removed a stick of ram, and then turned my PC back on and got it to post. this time it froze on the error message that "system memory has changed...firmware is being updated" message, and once again my fan speed kicked up a notch when it froze.

This seems like it is a mobo issue. I already packed it up in preparation to make an exchange at Microcenter tomorrow.

Has anyone seen this before? I read about resetting CMOS and did not do that but since one of the fan pins seems to be dysfunctional I would think this is probably a mobo issue. I don't know if it is worth hooking it back up to see. I can just exchange regardless.


Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!
October 20, 2010 4:59:05 AM

One more thing I noticed - my comp did freeze a few hours before all of this which knocked my system time back 3 hours. This eventually happened with my MSI mobo as well.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
October 20, 2010 5:43:40 AM

ecs33 said:
One more thing I noticed - my comp did freeze a few hours before all of this which knocked my system time back 3 hours. This eventually happened with my MSI mobo as well.


I would suspect the ram, but if you can get a new motherboard you can go ahead and try that, since its already boxed up.
It really could be any number of things. Next time, before packing everything up go ahead and ask your question here. Just assuming its the motherboard and exchanging it is not troubleshooting.

New motherboards don't fail often, they typically will be DOA if there's a problem. I'm sure you know there are exceptions, but I would suspect some other things first before the mobo.

Anyway, I hope this clears up your issues but if not we'll be here to help.
GL
buzznut
m
0
l
Related resources
a b V Motherboard
October 20, 2010 2:11:04 PM

^+1

Most definitely let us know before you decide to return it. Otherwise it'll be more work for you to troubleshoot.

Just keep in mind that is the same issue occurs with the second board, it''l definitely NOT be the board. In which case it might be like buzznut stated - could be the ram :p 
m
0
l
October 21, 2010 5:18:57 AM

Thanks for the help guys.

I ended up getting 2 x 2GB sticks of Kingston KHX1600 memory but I realized that the memory is rated to run at 1.7 volts and my mobo recommends not setting voltage past 1.65v. I currently do have it set to 1.7 volts and my system has been completely stable so far.

Should I lower the voltage to 1.65V? What would the repercussions be? What steps would I have to follow according to the direction that you give me?

Thanks!
m
0
l
October 21, 2010 12:43:57 PM

Hey Guys,

Just for clarification, I ended up switching my mobo and upgrading my memory. However the fact that the memory is rated at .5 volts higher than what my mobo recommends scares me a little bit.

After building, my system booted perfectly and I did not have a crash. I'll continue to test after work and take the steps that you may give me to correct my memory.

Thanks again!
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
October 21, 2010 1:47:02 PM

Lol, your mobo shouldn't have any problems with voltages like that. I have pushed the voltages on my ram to 2.3v and lowered it to 1.5v. The reason why you increase or decrease voltage is to mess with the ram's speeds.

If you really want to, you can just just decrease the ram's voltage yourself to the 1.65v limit - but if you see a small speed drop don't be surprised. x)

And to lower it, you'd have to do that in your BIOS.
m
0
l
October 21, 2010 1:52:29 PM

Hey Gekko,

I'm aware that it's not a big deal with RAM itself, but my mobo has a warning that says "ram voltages higher than 1.65v may damage your processor."

Is it still ok to push it just slightly past that point?
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
October 21, 2010 2:15:27 PM

Well i would. But that's mostly because i have pushed ram voltages past the recommended lines and i have never had any problems, BUT I'm not saying you should.

I have not work much with Intel boards, so I wouldn't know if these boards are as reliable as the ones i torture (xP).

Why do you want to raise the voltage? Your ram should be 1600Mhz, that's just about all you'll need for that board xD
m
0
l
October 21, 2010 3:00:52 PM

The ram is rated to run between 1.7 and 1.9, which is just slightly beyond the 1.65 recommended by the board. The board does support 1600 memory but the board has a disclaimer saying that for all 1600 memory all timings and voltages will have to be manually set, which I am fine with. I just don't want to take a big risk.

If the risk is small, whatever. I almost want a 1366 setup anyway ;) .
m
0
l
a c 156 V Motherboard
October 21, 2010 3:05:19 PM

Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
October 21, 2010 8:35:35 PM

ecs33 said:
The ram is rated to run between 1.7 and 1.9, which is just slightly beyond the 1.65 recommended by the board. The board does support 1600 memory but the board has a disclaimer saying that for all 1600 memory all timings and voltages will have to be manually set, which I am fine with. I just don't want to take a big risk.

If the risk is small, whatever. I almost want a 1366 setup anyway ;) .


Lol, if you can set it at 1.7v I would leave it at that. That shouldn't make much of a difference. If a board was so sensitive that .05v would kill it, you'd be hearing it all over forums talking smack about that board :lol: 

Like i said if you just wanna follow the rules lower it to 1.65v, but i honestly don't think you need to. 1.7v works fine and if at this voltages the speed stays at 1600mhz, hell go for it. x)

jsc said:
Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.


Lol i was looking for this! Glad you posted it, although i'm not sure how breadboarding will help with the memory voltages :heink:  ?
m
0
l
!