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First upgrade to my loop, couple of questions

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  • Water Cooling
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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December 23, 2012 3:36:44 PM

Hello, everyone, and thank you for reading my post. I have decided to take a step forward and water cool my GPU recently. Just ordered a water block for my GTX560ti. Went with the HeatKiller waterblock,
(http://www.frozencpu.com/products/12903/ex-blc-900/Heat...)

and I would just like to get some insight on if this should work fine in my current setup.
My case is a Thermaltake Kandalf LCS VD4000BWS, (http://thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1309&ID=1412)
it includes a 500L/hr pump, a fairly large radiator for the door of my case, (3x120mm fans) res, and CPU block. I upgraded the CPU water block to a Raystorm block. (http://www.xs-pc.com/products/waterblocks/cpu-waterbloc...)

My only real concern, is if the 500L/hr pump that comes with my setup, will be enough to keep the flow going through the GPU block, CPU block, and rad. Their page says: 500L/hr a pump can easily handle extra water blocks of GPU, memory, HDD, or Northbridge.
The tubing is 3/8".

Sorry for all the links, just trying to include as much information that I can think of that will help you guys give a good answer. If you have questions, let me know and I'll try to explain more.

More about : upgrade loop couple questions

a c 78 K Overclocking
December 24, 2012 8:32:09 AM

can you include full system specs? this should include all your watercooling hardware and the internal hardware as well.

couple of concerns I have is that the stock rad provided by Tt is of alu construct, not good if it's running alongside a copper based raystorm. anyways lets have the entire low down and lets try moving on from there.
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December 24, 2012 2:28:40 PM

Lutfij said:
can you include full system specs? this should include all your watercooling hardware and the internal hardware as well.

couple of concerns I have is that the stock rad provided by Tt is of alu construct, not good if it's running alongside a copper based raystorm. anyways lets have the entire low down and lets try moving on from there.



My apologies, I should have included full system specs in the first place.
Rosewill 800 Watt power supply (Soon to be a 1300 watt),
AMD FX8150,
16 gigs of Gskill Sniper Series,
Zotac GTX560ti AMP! Edition (50302m),
Asus Sabertooth R1 Motherboard,
Thermaltake P500 pump,
Reservoir Contains 350 CC?,
All distilled water with a PT Nuke,
Performance radiator :
(A) Dimension of radiator : H 407 x W 120 x D 35 mm
(B) Three 1300 rpm 120 mm fans - I just bought 3 new 2000 rpm fans, that push 74 CFM, to help cool the radiator more with the added GPU block.

The radiator appears to be copper piping though actually, as the original water block that came with the system was an all copper block. Picture of the rad: http://i.imgur.com/zOZzl.jpg
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a c 78 K Overclocking
December 24, 2012 4:08:36 PM

that Tt rad is underperforming in my books. But to get back on topic, seems you can fit the 560 block on the Ti perfectly. However the pump looks to me to be the weakest link. If your upgrading why not get a XSPC rad+res , some tubing and that GPU block, don't forget the fittings?

in the world of watercooling, cfm isn't king. What you need is high static pressure fans for your setup. Like scythe AP-15's
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December 25, 2012 3:00:37 AM

Well, the radiator is external, and the fans are as well, so they won't really matter about pressure inside the case. The girlfriend got me the waterblock for my GPU for christmas, and I just wanted to make sure it SHOULD be okay to hook up to my current rig. I have some really good tubing, the pump still runs like a champ, same with the res, but they would be my next thing to upgrade. As for the time being though, do you agree that I should be okay to hook up in this order: Res>pump>GPU>CPU>Rad? Or do you think I should do CPU>RAD?

Thanks again for the responses Lutfij.
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a c 78 K Overclocking
December 25, 2012 3:28:58 AM

order doesn't matter. Only thing to remember is the water should be fed to the pump so it isn't starved.

You can move on with your hookup. I'd be sure to get some tubing on hand, in case you'r tubing may spring a leak during leak testing.

Your welcome. If you need anymore answers-> check out the watercooling sticky as I'm sure your getting your feet wet here for the first time. It'll walk you through the whole procedure. If you'd like the same sort of tubing as you have now, look up tygon, norprene tubing. Its rubbery and black in texture.

We're also around to help :) 
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December 25, 2012 3:38:42 AM

Lutfij said:
order down't matter. Only thing to remember is the water should be fed to the pump so it isn't starved.

You can move on with your hookup. I'd be sure to get some tubing on hand, in case you'r tubing may spring a leak during leak testing.

Your welcome. If you need anymore answers-> check out the watercooling sticky as I'm sure your getting your feet wet here for the first time. It'll walk you through the whole procedure. If you'd like the same sort of tubing as you have now, look up tygon, norprene tubing. Its rubbery and black in texture.

We're also around to help :) 



I've got some extra tubing on hand, bought 7 feet of it one day from Xoxide actually, haha. They've always been good to me there, and hook me up with deals. http://www.xoxide.com/primoflex-38id-58od-uvblue.html

The pump and res are really cool, it's a combo unit, with the lead into the pump, inside the res tank. So as long as there is water inside the tank, there is water to the pump. I make sure to prime it really well, and fill the pump up with water before even turning it on.

Surprising it may seem, I've actually water cooled for a long time. My first rig was a HyperThreaded Pentium 4, from 3.0ghz, up to 3.6ghz. But I've only done the CPUs. This will be my first "big" step in a long time. The case just doesn't have enough airflow at the bottom of the case for me to be happy with my GPU temps, usually hovering around 80C under a full load. Now, that GPU is stock over clocked from 800mhz, to 950mhz, memory at 4400, and 1.15 volts, so I'm sure that's normal for it to get kind of hot. I'm just going to be happy with it dropping a bunch (hopefully).

You've been a great help, I'll take some pictures and let you know how the final result goes. Have to order some barbs/fittings, the GF didn't know (which I don't blame her, she tried and did an amazing job). Thanks again Lutfij! Merry Christmas!
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a c 78 K Overclocking
December 25, 2012 3:48:05 AM

hehe, Sorry I thought of you that way :/  my bad. No worries mate! But I usually forget some info and I try the watercooling sticky to bring me upto speed.

Happy cooling, you can expect the GPU to run near your cpu temps...well not close but close enough. In watercooling, GPU's benefit the most.

glad to be of help. Keep me posted. If you've forgotten your thread, just PM me. :) 
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December 25, 2012 4:17:57 AM

Best answer selected by Coma9.
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a c 78 K Overclocking
December 25, 2012 4:21:50 AM

thank you for BA.
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